Author Topic: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?  (Read 9302 times)

littlebird

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Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« on: March 01, 2016, 09:50:25 AM »
Every time I go to Costco it seems like they have more organic options and fewer regular options. I'm opposed to buying organic on ideological grounds separate from the increased cost associated that I don't really want to argue about here. I try to vote with my dollars on this issue, but Costco often only carries one type of a certain item (i.e. canned black beans) so I can't. It's starting to feel like I'm going to have to stop shopping there.
My question is for people who have shopped at other bulk stores, like Sam's or BJs; have you noticed a similar trend in those stores? If they're offering more standard options I might consider switching my membership.

Philociraptor

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #1 on: March 01, 2016, 10:07:03 AM »
Sam's is the other way around, mostly standard, with some organic thrown in there. If you tell them you are thinking of getting a membership I'm sure they would let you walk the store and look around.

KittyFooFoo

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #2 on: March 01, 2016, 10:14:33 AM »
Which products specifically are organic only? 

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #3 on: March 01, 2016, 10:29:23 AM »
I also try to buy not-organic on ideological/scientific grounds (I have degrees in this stuff; this isn't based on Facebook memes.) On some things I have given up, like carrots. Apparently it's pretty easy to grow carrots following "organic" standards and since my objection can be summarized as "growing food in less resource-efficient ways hurts the poor by increasing costs and damages the environment through increased land use" I don't necessarily have a problem with it if it's cheaper. It's disappointing to hear Costco is converting more of its sourcing to organic; I had been considering buying a membership when the one they're building near me opens. I know they consider organic a "premium" on a product, which is really what people should think of it as.

littlebird

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2016, 10:44:38 AM »
@Shoulder, I'm a biologist and agree with you.

@Kitty, off the top of my head: lettuce, pasta, salsa, rice (non-gmo project which I'm even more against. I want more GMO), quinoa (same as rice), canned green beans. Tons of other stuff too.

@Philociraptor, thanks, guess I'll go check out Sam's!

Altons Bobs

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2016, 10:47:28 AM »
I don't know why people think organic stuff is more expensive at Costco.  They're not.  I prefer organic whenever possible.  I don't think they're more expensive.  One day I was at Costco, they had regular grapes and organic grapes, same type, same size, same weight, side by side.  Regular was $8.99, organic was $7.99.  I chose the $7.99 organic kind, but I saw people putting the regular ones that were more expensive in their carts. You can still do the same, if you prefer more toxins in your body and pay more for non-organic.  I for one am glad that Costco is going more organic.

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2016, 10:54:11 AM »
@Shoulder, I'm a biologist and agree with you.

High five!

Quote
@Kitty, off the top of my head: lettuce, pasta, salsa, rice (non-gmo project which I'm even more against. I want more GMO), quinoa (same as rice), canned green beans. Tons of other stuff too.

If you're in their service area, Wegman's has enormous packs of pasta, canned green beans, and rice that aren't organic and are quite inexpensive.

I don't know why people think organic stuff is more expensive at Costco.  They're not.  I prefer organic whenever possible.  I don't think they're more expensive.  One day I was at Costco, they had regular grapes and organic grapes, same type, same size, same weight, side by side.  Regular was $8.99, organic was $7.99.  I chose the $7.99 organic kind, but I saw people putting the regular ones that were more expensive in their carts. You can still do the same, if you prefer more toxins in your body and pay more for non-organic.  I for one am glad that Costco is going more organic.

Consider that you may be ignorant on this subject. You don't get an appreciably higher dose of pesticides or herbicides from eating standard food, and you may be more likely to get food poisoning from "organic" food. And there is simply no good reason whatsoever to avoid GMOs.

Generally when I see "regular" products that are more expensive than "organic" substitutes I don't buy either as it's a good indicator that there simple isn't a good deal on that product currently.

bacchi

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2016, 11:07:31 AM »
Some crops, particularly fruits and nuts, have a near equivalent yield between organic and conventionally grown. Carrots, however, isn't one of them.

As usual, there are conflicting reports. This one indicates that the yield is equivalent.

https://www.organic-center.org/hot-science/organic-carrots-have-similar-yields-and-potential-for-higher-nutrients/

« Last Edit: March 01, 2016, 11:10:23 AM by bacchi »

ShoulderThingThatGoesUp

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #8 on: March 01, 2016, 11:09:09 AM »
Some crops, particularly fruits and nuts, have a near equivalent yield between organic and conventionally grown. Carrots, however, isn't one of them.

I wonder what the deal is with me not being able to find conventional carrots.

littlebird

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #9 on: March 01, 2016, 11:14:35 AM »
You can still do the same, if you prefer more toxins in your body and pay more for non-organic.  I for one am glad that Costco is going more organic.

I already said above that I don't want to argue about this, but I disagree with your reasoning. Organic farmers also use pesticides, just different ones.

The problem is not higher cost organics but that Costco often doesn't offer both options. It's your right to buy organic if you wish, I'm trying to exercise my right to buy bulk non-organic by potentially switching to a different warehouse store.

thd7t

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #10 on: March 01, 2016, 11:27:19 AM »
@Shoulder, I'm a biologist and agree with you.

@Kitty, off the top of my head: lettuce, pasta, salsa, rice (non-gmo project which I'm even more against. I want more GMO), quinoa (same as rice), canned green beans. Tons of other stuff too.

@Philociraptor, thanks, guess I'll go check out Sam's!
I agree with you on a lot of this, but I think that there are a few of these items that are grown organically as a standard.  Labeling isn't consistent on this.  The example that I'd give (because it's on your list) is salad.  I read (a few years ago, so my information could be out of date) that the first companies bagging "baby salad greens" were organic farms (the book claimed that it was easier to grow them organically).  Apparently, they were packaging the same product labelled each way (conventional and organic).  I've never seen a big cost difference between those (none at my grocery store), but I generally treat them the same. 

That said, most of your list is usually available (and less expensive) grown conventionally.  I definitely try to take most of this on a case-by-case basis, because I know that some crops (like bananas) can cause a lot of environmental harm if grown organically.

Also, I agree with you on GMOs.  Increasing worldwide food production is enough of a reason for me.

Cromacster

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #11 on: March 01, 2016, 11:31:23 AM »
Some crops, particularly fruits and nuts, have a near equivalent yield between organic and conventionally grown. Carrots, however, isn't one of them.

I wonder what the deal is with me not being able to find conventional carrots.

I could imagine conventional carrot growing either already qualified as "organic" or the change was so small it was a no brainier not to switch.

I think it was Mccormick spice company that did essentially the same thing.  They had a press release saying they were now completely organic and non GMO.   It was shown that they changed essentially nothing and made a big PR stunt, but they qualified as organic and Non gmo so why not?

bacchi

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #12 on: March 01, 2016, 11:37:24 AM »
Some crops, particularly fruits and nuts, have a near equivalent yield between organic and conventionally grown. Carrots, however, isn't one of them.

I wonder what the deal is with me not being able to find conventional carrots.

See my edit above. From the study, "Marketable  yield  of  organic  carrots  was  11%  higher  than  that  of
conventionally  grown  carrots." If it's even close, any grower would grow organic and sell for a premium.

(The abstract also had this gem, "The contents of ß-carotene,  vitamin  C and nitrogen were significantly lower in organically grown than in conventionally grown carrot," which is quite different from the blurb.)

littlebird

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #13 on: March 01, 2016, 12:04:13 PM »
@Shoulder, I'm a biologist and agree with you.

@Kitty, off the top of my head: lettuce, pasta, salsa, rice (non-gmo project which I'm even more against. I want more GMO), quinoa (same as rice), canned green beans. Tons of other stuff too.

@Philociraptor, thanks, guess I'll go check out Sam's!
I agree with you on a lot of this, but I think that there are a few of these items that are grown organically as a standard.  Labeling isn't consistent on this.  The example that I'd give (because it's on your list) is salad.  I read (a few years ago, so my information could be out of date) that the first companies bagging "baby salad greens" were organic farms (the book claimed that it was easier to grow them organically).  Apparently, they were packaging the same product labelled each way (conventional and organic).  I've never seen a big cost difference between those (none at my grocery store), but I generally treat them the same. 
I didn't know that! I guess I can stop beating myself up about buying organic salad :)

maco

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #14 on: March 01, 2016, 12:18:02 PM »
Last time I was there I noticed the tortilla chips were cheaper if you got organic.

OP, compare the prices on canned beans to your regular grocery store. I've found my local Giant (across the street from Costco!) is cheaper for canned beans and canned tomatoes.

thd7t

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #15 on: March 01, 2016, 12:20:51 PM »
@Shoulder, I'm a biologist and agree with you.

@Kitty, off the top of my head: lettuce, pasta, salsa, rice (non-gmo project which I'm even more against. I want more GMO), quinoa (same as rice), canned green beans. Tons of other stuff too.

@Philociraptor, thanks, guess I'll go check out Sam's!
I agree with you on a lot of this, but I think that there are a few of these items that are grown organically as a standard.  Labeling isn't consistent on this.  The example that I'd give (because it's on your list) is salad.  I read (a few years ago, so my information could be out of date) that the first companies bagging "baby salad greens" were organic farms (the book claimed that it was easier to grow them organically).  Apparently, they were packaging the same product labelled each way (conventional and organic).  I've never seen a big cost difference between those (none at my grocery store), but I generally treat them the same. 
I didn't know that! I guess I can stop beating myself up about buying organic salad :)
I have to emphasize that this was baby salad greens and that the information is not new, so I can't promise that it's up to date.

justajane

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #16 on: March 01, 2016, 01:29:50 PM »
Yeah, I was pretty annoyed when Costco only started carrying organic Mott's applesauce in the single servings. I guess they realized that most parents have bought the organic thing hook, line, and sinker and weren't interested in non-organic applesauce for their snowflakes (won't anyone think of the children?). I still buy it there because it's still cheaper than other places, and I like non-sweetened applesauce for my kids. Aldi only has it with HFCS. I don't care that it's HFCS; I just don't want added sugar in any form.

But the Costco thing still irks me. I don't buy canned beans there for that reason. We buy them at Aldi.

We usually joke about the prepared organic food samples at Costco. Usually if it's organic, it tastes like shit. Or organic edamame pasta. Blech!

I was also annoyed when they stopped selling Spam at Costco. True confession, we love the stuff. Apparently it is no longer hipster cool and thus they don't have it anymore.

Trudie

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #17 on: March 01, 2016, 02:32:14 PM »
I've never drunk the organic kool-aid myself (sometimes it's "smoke and mirrors"; lots of propaganda), but all else being equal I don't try to avoid it either if it's the most cost-effective.

With that said, you might give Aldi a shot... although I know they've made big changes to their offerings and stocking lots of organics, non-GMOs, etcetera.

(Actually, I'd be interested in a thread (started by scientist people) on why organic and non-GMO may not always be the way to go.  As for me, I subscribe to basic homemade cooking - regardless of whether it's organic -- but try to cut out processed foods and snacks high in sodium.)

partgypsy

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #18 on: March 01, 2016, 03:12:32 PM »
The reason I try to buy organic is for environmental reasons, not specifically for human health reasons. Pesticide use impacts migratory songbirds and other birds, predator birds, honeybees, worms, spiders, bats, and other animals. 
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/08/150806121815.htm
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/08/120827074200.htm
Organic and other nonconventional farming systems like crop rotation, field cover, multi crop planting also reduces the amount of artificial fertilizer needed and soil erosion (easier on the soil and water system)

There is increasing evidence that pesticide use may have health effects on humans, which needs additional research. But there are concerns of the effect of pesticides, particularly type II diabetes, but possibly ADHD, parkinsons disease.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/09/150915211340.htm

Organic farming reduces the load of pesticides, artificial fertilizers on the environment which is a good thing.

maco

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #19 on: March 01, 2016, 03:19:45 PM »
The reason I try to buy organic is for environmental reasons, not specifically for human health reasons. Pesticide use impacts migratory songbirds and other birds, predator birds, honeybees, worms, spiders, bats, and other animals. 
I just wish I could trust that organic licensing actually meant anything. I've read about halfway through Green Gone Wrong, and ugh! There is so much fraud and exploitation! Small producers end up with exclusive contracts with major companies as their only option to market (because the locals can't afford to buy organic, and small producers can't afford the licensing on their own, so major companies get certified and their producers--only a sample of whom are visited!--can only sell as "organic" when selling under the major's label, not when selling independently, even though it's the same land, same methods, etc.), despite the rules saying old growth deforestation and monocropping aren't "organic" they still happen, and because organic has such high demand, they happen at possibly a higher rate than when the non-organic crops! You don't have to wait several years for pesticides and other banned chemicals to "wear off" the land before being "organic" if you can claim it's been fallow for centuries (pulls curtain closed just ignore that by "fallow" we mean "old growth rain forest").

Totally with you on the honeybees, etc.

I also wish there was a way to say "produced in an ecologically friendly manner" that didn't say anything about GMOs. We've been modifying organisms' genes for millennia through cross-breeding and decades using radiation. Oh, yeah, the old radiation method where you douse the seeds in radiation, plant them, and see what happens, having no idea how many genes were changed in the process...yeah, that sounds way safer than changing one specific gene.

littlebird

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #20 on: March 01, 2016, 03:19:49 PM »
Again, we're getting off topic here since I'm not here to argue about organics. I'm here to find other places besides Costco to buy bulk food that's not organic.
« Last Edit: March 01, 2016, 03:23:35 PM by littlebird »

maco

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #21 on: March 01, 2016, 03:21:20 PM »
Again, we're getting off topic here since I'm not here to argue about organics. I'm here to find other places besides Costco to buy bulk food.
I still think you should check your unit prices and compare to a normal grocery store. Canned goods have a higher unit cost when bought in bulk at Costco than when bought one can at a time at the grocery store, at least in my area.

Jack

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #22 on: March 01, 2016, 03:27:24 PM »
Which products specifically are organic only?

The one that particularly annoys me is that the $4.99 conventional Wholly Guacamole was replaced by $7.99 organic Wholly Guacamole. (Prices are from memory and may be wrong.)

(Please don't rag on me for not buying avocados and making it myself; $5 of the guacamole has more than $5 worth of avocados in it! Plus it keeps longer.)

maco

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #23 on: March 02, 2016, 07:39:50 AM »
Which products specifically are organic only?

The one that particularly annoys me is that the $4.99 conventional Wholly Guacamole was replaced by $7.99 organic Wholly Guacamole. (Prices are from memory and may be wrong.)

(Please don't rag on me for not buying avocados and making it myself; $5 of the guacamole has more than $5 worth of avocados in it! Plus it keeps longer.)
I have to guess that it's that they couldn't find organic jalapeños, but the only Wholly Guacamole without jalapeños is the organic one, which means it's the only one used in our extended family, due to pepper allergies. They didn't just swap organic / conventional. It's a different recipe.

Apples

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #24 on: March 02, 2016, 01:46:47 PM »
Some crops, particularly fruits and nuts, have a near equivalent yield between organic and conventionally grown. Carrots, however, isn't one of them.

As usual, there are conflicting reports. This one indicates that the yield is equivalent.

https://www.organic-center.org/hot-science/organic-carrots-have-similar-yields-and-potential-for-higher-nutrients/

So, for apples, peaches and nectarines this isn't true on the Eastern seaboard generally speaking.  Organic yields are lower for the same high quality of fruit.  You may get the same number of bushels of apples, but less are usable due to pest and disease issues.  Possibly it is out in dry WA and CA, but just wait until they run out of water and then there won't be any fruit, let alone conventional vs. organic.

serpentstooth

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #25 on: March 02, 2016, 02:06:25 PM »
Every time I go to Costco it seems like they have more organic options and fewer regular options. I'm opposed to buying organic on ideological grounds separate from the increased cost associated that I don't really want to argue about here. I try to vote with my dollars on this issue, but Costco often only carries one type of a certain item (i.e. canned black beans) so I can't. It's starting to feel like I'm going to have to stop shopping there.
My question is for people who have shopped at other bulk stores, like Sam's or BJs; have you noticed a similar trend in those stores? If they're offering more standard options I might consider switching my membership.

The impression I get is that Costco's target customer is the Upper Middle Income family and they sell stuff that demographic finds important, which would explain the organic shift. My mother and I split Costco and BJ's memberships, and it seems BJ's in general skews less Stuff White People Like in just about every respect, including less organic.

mm1970

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #26 on: March 02, 2016, 02:10:04 PM »
Again, we're getting off topic here since I'm not here to argue about organics. I'm here to find other places besides Costco to buy bulk food.
I still think you should check your unit prices and compare to a normal grocery store. Canned goods have a higher unit cost when bought in bulk at Costco than when bought one can at a time at the grocery store, at least in my area.
totally the opposite here

serpentstooth

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #27 on: March 02, 2016, 02:11:58 PM »
Yeah, I was pretty annoyed when Costco only started carrying organic Mott's applesauce in the single servings. I guess they realized that most parents have bought the organic thing hook, line, and sinker and weren't interested in non-organic applesauce for their snowflakes (won't anyone think of the children?). I still buy it there because it's still cheaper than other places, and I like non-sweetened applesauce for my kids. Aldi only has it with HFCS. I don't care that it's HFCS; I just don't want added sugar in any form.

But the Costco thing still irks me. I don't buy canned beans there for that reason. We buy them at Aldi.

We usually joke about the prepared organic food samples at Costco. Usually if it's organic, it tastes like shit. Or organic edamame pasta. Blech!

I was also annoyed when they stopped selling Spam at Costco. True confession, we love the stuff. Apparently it is no longer hipster cool and thus they don't have it anymore.

Aldi sells those little squeezy pouches of applesauce with no sugar added, not organic, under their Simply Nature brand. They're $1.89 for 4 where I live and probably lower by you.

maco

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #28 on: March 02, 2016, 02:24:01 PM »
Again, we're getting off topic here since I'm not here to argue about organics. I'm here to find other places besides Costco to buy bulk food.
I still think you should check your unit prices and compare to a normal grocery store. Canned goods have a higher unit cost when bought in bulk at Costco than when bought one can at a time at the grocery store, at least in my area.
totally the opposite here
Huh. Tomatoes at Giant are 79¢ for a 14.5oz can and beans are 69¢ for the same size (59¢ when on sale).  And I'm in a very high cost of living area (DC). I might be incorrectly assuming that Costco's prices are standard nationwide, though.

justajane

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #29 on: March 02, 2016, 02:27:39 PM »
Yeah, I was pretty annoyed when Costco only started carrying organic Mott's applesauce in the single servings. I guess they realized that most parents have bought the organic thing hook, line, and sinker and weren't interested in non-organic applesauce for their snowflakes (won't anyone think of the children?). I still buy it there because it's still cheaper than other places, and I like non-sweetened applesauce for my kids. Aldi only has it with HFCS. I don't care that it's HFCS; I just don't want added sugar in any form.

But the Costco thing still irks me. I don't buy canned beans there for that reason. We buy them at Aldi.

We usually joke about the prepared organic food samples at Costco. Usually if it's organic, it tastes like shit. Or organic edamame pasta. Blech!

I was also annoyed when they stopped selling Spam at Costco. True confession, we love the stuff. Apparently it is no longer hipster cool and thus they don't have it anymore.

Aldi sells those little squeezy pouches of applesauce with no sugar added, not organic, under their Simply Nature brand. They're $1.89 for 4 where I live and probably lower by you.

Thanks. I think I pay about 20 cents each for the organic Mott's at Costco. I know I'm being stupid, but I just can't deal with those pouches. They irk me. First off, are they really recyclable? I don't know. I know it's the same concept as the go-gurts, which I also buy, but for some reason, I just want my kids to learn how to eat applesauce with a spoon! The packaging just strikes me as worse for some reason than the go-gurt packaging. I recognize this as a inconsistency on my part.

Sometimes we buy the large containers and spoon it out into a separate bowl, but I like the portion control and the ease for lunch of individually packaged things.

I do buy the flavored applesauces at Aldi - pomegranate apple, blueberry apple. They are tasty but are organic as well.

serpentstooth

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #30 on: March 02, 2016, 02:33:46 PM »
Yeah, I was pretty annoyed when Costco only started carrying organic Mott's applesauce in the single servings. I guess they realized that most parents have bought the organic thing hook, line, and sinker and weren't interested in non-organic applesauce for their snowflakes (won't anyone think of the children?). I still buy it there because it's still cheaper than other places, and I like non-sweetened applesauce for my kids. Aldi only has it with HFCS. I don't care that it's HFCS; I just don't want added sugar in any form.

But the Costco thing still irks me. I don't buy canned beans there for that reason. We buy them at Aldi.

We usually joke about the prepared organic food samples at Costco. Usually if it's organic, it tastes like shit. Or organic edamame pasta. Blech!

I was also annoyed when they stopped selling Spam at Costco. True confession, we love the stuff. Apparently it is no longer hipster cool and thus they don't have it anymore.

Aldi sells those little squeezy pouches of applesauce with no sugar added, not organic, under their Simply Nature brand. They're $1.89 for 4 where I live and probably lower by you.

Thanks. I think I pay about 20 cents each for the organic Mott's at Costco. I know I'm being stupid, but I just can't deal with those pouches. They irk me. First off, are they really recyclable? I don't know. I know it's the same concept as the go-gurts, which I also buy, but for some reason, I just want my kids to learn how to eat applesauce with a spoon! The packaging just strikes me as worse for some reason than the go-gurt packaging. I recognize this as a inconsistency on my part.

Sometimes we buy the large containers and spoon it out into a separate bowl, but I like the portion control and the ease for lunch of individually packaged things.

I do buy the flavored applesauces at Aldi - pomegranate apple, blueberry apple. They are tasty but are organic as well.

The squeezies are ridiculous, but they are literally the only solid food my 10 month old will eat so, fine. I buy the damn squeezy pouches and then sulk about it. I'm hoping that by the time we use up the ones I have in house she's eating real food like a normal baby.

justajane

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #31 on: March 02, 2016, 02:39:14 PM »
They are genius for babies. I will grant you that, serpentstooth.

Gone Fishing

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #32 on: March 02, 2016, 03:12:20 PM »
+1 for Aldi.  I haven't compared in years, but when I did, the per unit prices were about the same or better at Aldi vs. the clubs and it didn't require me to purchase a membership or store large quantities of perishable items.  Aldi recently removed all added MSG and trans fats from their store brand products.  Our local Aldi does carry unsweetened apple sauce from time to time as a special product. 

Teacherstache

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #33 on: March 02, 2016, 07:55:35 PM »
Do you happen to have a GFS (Gordon Food Service) near you? They are a restaurant supply store, so they sell food in bulk, but they also sell to the public with no membership fee required. There is almost no organic there. Prices on spices, chicken, tomato sauce, among others are really good.

serpentstooth

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #34 on: March 02, 2016, 07:58:08 PM »
Do you happen to have a GFS (Gordon Food Service) near you? They are a restaurant supply store, so they sell food in bulk, but they also sell to the public with no membership fee required. There is almost no organic there. Prices on spices, chicken, tomato sauce, among others are really good.

In that vein, it might be worth seeking out a Restaurant Depot, too. You'll need to finagle a membership, but that doesn't seem too hard.

vhalros

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #35 on: March 02, 2016, 08:00:07 PM »
If you happen to be in the Massachusettes/New Hampshire area, Market Basket has prices that are competitive with Costco (although Costco definitely beats them in some areas).

slappy

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #36 on: March 03, 2016, 06:03:21 AM »
If you happen to be in the Massachusettes/New Hampshire area, Market Basket has prices that are competitive with Costco (although Costco definitely beats them in some areas).

Market Basket is kind of like our Aldi. :)  I'd love to hear what you have found cheaper at Costco.  I find that BJs prices are decent enough compared to Shaws/Hannaford, but certainly nothing to write home about.  I visit occasionally when my sister in law goes, and I'm usually disappointed in the prices.

vhalros

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #37 on: March 03, 2016, 06:15:24 AM »
Market Basket is kind of like our Aldi. :)  I'd love to hear what you have found cheaper at Costco.  I find that BJs prices are decent enough compared to Shaws/Hannaford, but certainly nothing to write home about.  I visit occasionally when my sister in law goes, and I'm usually disappointed in the prices.

Mostly things that will keep for a while. Oat meal, olive oil, nuts (pecans, walnuts), rice, coffee (depending on the brand you like; the Costco brand is pretty good), soy sauce, and tofu. Mushrooms used to be cheaper at Costco that Market Basket, but I noticed Market Basket dropped there price on them this week. Onions are also usually cheaper at Costco, but the bags are so big I often can't finish them before some spoil (also each individual onion is gigantic). Household goods are also usually cheaper at Costco, but only if Costco sells their store brand in that category. The toilet paper is a good deal.

justajane

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #38 on: March 03, 2016, 06:34:17 AM »
Just as an aside, this thread made me think of my friend who was a Diet Pepsi fan until they replaced aspartame with sucralose. He refuses to drink it on principle because "Pepsi caved" and he can't respect them or support them. He also won't go to any restaurant that advertises the non-GMO thing like Chipotle.

mm1970

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #39 on: March 03, 2016, 10:06:51 AM »
Again, we're getting off topic here since I'm not here to argue about organics. I'm here to find other places besides Costco to buy bulk food.
I still think you should check your unit prices and compare to a normal grocery store. Canned goods have a higher unit cost when bought in bulk at Costco than when bought one can at a time at the grocery store, at least in my area.
totally the opposite here
Huh. Tomatoes at Giant are 79¢ for a 14.5oz can and beans are 69¢ for the same size (59¢ when on sale).  And I'm in a very high cost of living area (DC). I might be incorrectly assuming that Costco's prices are standard nationwide, though.
I'm in So Cal.  Tomatoes in a can are >$1 and beans are too, for the 14.5 oz cans (approx). 

Occasionally can get a sale for $0.59 (beans) or $0.79 (tomatoes), but the 8-pack of tomatoes at Costco are almost always a better deal.

I think it's less that Costco prices are higher here - they are probably the same as DC Costco.
It's more that our grocery store prices are high.  And our options are limited.  We have Albertsons and Vons (which merged), Ralphs, and that's it for regular grocery stores.

maco

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #40 on: March 03, 2016, 11:17:36 AM »
Again, we're getting off topic here since I'm not here to argue about organics. I'm here to find other places besides Costco to buy bulk food.
I still think you should check your unit prices and compare to a normal grocery store. Canned goods have a higher unit cost when bought in bulk at Costco than when bought one can at a time at the grocery store, at least in my area.
totally the opposite here
Huh. Tomatoes at Giant are 79¢ for a 14.5oz can and beans are 69¢ for the same size (59¢ when on sale).  And I'm in a very high cost of living area (DC). I might be incorrectly assuming that Costco's prices are standard nationwide, though.
I'm in So Cal.  Tomatoes in a can are >$1 and beans are too, for the 14.5 oz cans (approx). 

Occasionally can get a sale for $0.59 (beans) or $0.79 (tomatoes), but the 8-pack of tomatoes at Costco are almost always a better deal.

I think it's less that Costco prices are higher here - they are probably the same as DC Costco.
It's more that our grocery store prices are high.  And our options are limited.  We have Albertsons and Vons (which merged), Ralphs, and that's it for regular grocery stores.
Wow! I wouldn't have figured on tomatoes being so expensive in a place where they grow year-round!

mm1970

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Re: Costco moving towards all organic, other options?
« Reply #41 on: March 03, 2016, 01:36:02 PM »
Again, we're getting off topic here since I'm not here to argue about organics. I'm here to find other places besides Costco to buy bulk food.
I still think you should check your unit prices and compare to a normal grocery store. Canned goods have a higher unit cost when bought in bulk at Costco than when bought one can at a time at the grocery store, at least in my area.
totally the opposite here
Huh. Tomatoes at Giant are 79¢ for a 14.5oz can and beans are 69¢ for the same size (59¢ when on sale).  And I'm in a very high cost of living area (DC). I might be incorrectly assuming that Costco's prices are standard nationwide, though.
I'm in So Cal.  Tomatoes in a can are >$1 and beans are too, for the 14.5 oz cans (approx). 

Occasionally can get a sale for $0.59 (beans) or $0.79 (tomatoes), but the 8-pack of tomatoes at Costco are almost always a better deal.

I think it's less that Costco prices are higher here - they are probably the same as DC Costco.
It's more that our grocery store prices are high.  And our options are limited.  We have Albertsons and Vons (which merged), Ralphs, and that's it for regular grocery stores.
Wow! I wouldn't have figured on tomatoes being so expensive in a place where they grow year-round!
Overhead baby!

Funny story in the paper several years ago was a guy who paid more for strawberries grown near here in Santa Maria when he bought them HERE, than when he went on vacation to Georgia.  They even said "Santa Maria strawberries", and they were 1/3 less.