Author Topic: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?  (Read 45879 times)

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #100 on: February 24, 2014, 09:37:07 PM »
I see absolutely no evidence to support your statement that "she cannot afford them". 

The kids are well fed, active, involved in their community, and appear well-adjusted.  Their house backs' on to their grandparents home and they have a large extended family.  Her husband owns a real estate business that hit hard times when prices fell - which won't keep on that way forever.  What will not last forever are child-bearing years.

I'm sure that many people felt that Amy Daczcyn's children were not affordable on their incomes.  However, her children turned out to be quite grateful for their upbringing:

(her daughter Jamie)
"At the time, I didn't realize how valuable it was that we always had at least one stay-at-home parent. Looking back, I see that this was a massive luxury that I might not be able to give my future kids. Because our parents were so frugal, we got to see more of them because they weren't working long hours to make ends meet."

http://thefrugalshrink.blogspot.ca/2013/05/dacyczyn-interviews-jamie-part-1.html

This.  Who are you to say she cannot afford her children?
That is not the same person the OP was talking about.

No, it is the daughter of Amy Dacyzcn who had many of the same criticisms leveled against her for raising her children on an extreme "tightwad" budget  based on spending choices similar to theprudenthomemaker.

Gin1984

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #101 on: February 24, 2014, 09:52:53 PM »
Gin 1984 stated"
"As I have said beforehand, this decision to put her wants (to stay home) over a basic need of health insurance means I don't read the blog. 

Really?  She is not required to work to obtain full coverage for her children - they are already eligible at a cost of $100 a year for all seven of them. How would working help that?

While you are entitled to your opinion I am unclear how the logic works.
[/quote]
She is choosing not to get health insurance, maybe because of cost (likely) maybe for another reason.  I don't know.  I know she has stated that they don't have it a few times, when I first checked it out (it might have changed now) and that has pointed people, myself included to her list of what to do when (not if) you don't have insurance.  If she can't afford it, yes my assumption, go get a job and make the amount needed, even if that means nights.  Getting pregnant, without insurance, honestly scares me.   It makes me wonder what she is teaching her children.  Going without insurance is not something I support, when you have any other option.  Therefore, I don't support her blog/website by not going there.  That is the logic.

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #102 on: February 24, 2014, 10:10:01 PM »
Show me the link where this is stated otherwise it is your speculation.  Given all seven children can be covered for 100 dollars a year with no deductible please explain how working for coverage with so many young children needing care makes any sense - never mind financial sense. It would be a very poor parenting decision IMO

Cassie

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #103 on: February 24, 2014, 10:21:46 PM »
GIN1984-thank you for pointing out the obvious which many of us keep trying to do.  A few other people have also mentioned the same thing. Irresponsible to not have insurance, keep having kids, etc.  The people that think this is great really seem to be missing something here. don't really know why it is so difficult for them to see. Tried to use the dog rescue analogy earlier but guess it was too deep for some of them.   

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #104 on: February 24, 2014, 10:31:21 PM »
GIN1984-thank you for pointing out the obvious which many of us keep trying to do.  A few other people have also mentioned the same thing. Irresponsible to not have insurance, keep having kids, etc.  The people that think this is great really seem to be missing something here. don't really know why it is so difficult for them to see. Tried to use the dog rescue analogy earlier but guess it was too deep for some of them.   

Yes, it must have been too deep.

First, please demonstrate the evidence to substantiate your claim that there is no health insurance.  Her children can all be covered with no deductible for $100 a year which is certainly affordable.

Second, the dog rescue analogy.  I understand that you can only afford care for three maltese dogs right now.  That is fine and I'm glad you know your budget.  I don't; however, see any evidence that this particular family cannot afford the children they have so I fail to see how the "deep" analogy works in this case - or the logic.  In particular, I see no lack of meeting needs or giving what children need to thrive.

Have you spent any real time researching this by viewing the links or her site by the way?   

I would agree with you if we were talking about Nadya Suleman or any number of other examples, but not in this particular case.

Cassie

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #105 on: February 24, 2014, 10:52:14 PM »
Yes I actually read all her posts when someone recommended it.  That is how I came to my conclusions as many others have. It does not matter because you have decided that she is awesome.  Secretly I am sure that you are happy not to be one of her kids!

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #106 on: February 24, 2014, 10:58:34 PM »
I think her kids have a lot to be thankful for. I would choose that family over many many others.  My impression is that her children are fortunate in many ways.

I'm curious as to which posts brought you to conclude she had no insurance and was an irresponsible parent?

Bruinguy

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #107 on: February 24, 2014, 11:15:34 PM »
Since I have way too much free time on my hands...

http://theprudenthomemaker.com/index.php/about/living-on-food-storage

"Lots of other things happened during that first year living on our food storage. I became pregnant. My daughter broke her arm (we do not have insurance), and my husband sold his motorcycle (our only other vehicle besides our car) to help pay the mortgage one month. We planted a garden and not much grew. My sweet midwife (who had delivered my previous four children) delivered my fifth child out of the kindness of her heart."

I express no opinions on whether or not this makes anyone a good or bad person. 

Back to my regularly scheduled life...

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #108 on: February 25, 2014, 05:53:24 AM »
Thanks Bruinguy.

That post is from 2009 which is why it may have been difficult to find.  So we know for sure that five years ago they had no medical insurance and we know that at approx. $36 000/year of income they qualify for no deductible health and dental at a cost of $100 per year for all seven children.

Assuming that they have not enrolled in the Nevada Check-up, why would they make that choice?  I'm not in the US so I don't understand the ins and outs of health care so perhaps I'm missing something?  To me it seems like this would be a poor choice given that, in the case of a serious illness, the family would receive treatment but be potentially bankrupted by the bills without this coverage in place.

I can understand why others might feel that this decision does not make sense and puts the family at risk.  Given the extremely low cost I don't think it is an issue of affordability, but rather a personal decision.  I just don't understand why unless it is part of a self-reliance ethos which, while somewhat admirable on some level, seems far too risky to me to adopt or condone when you have children in your care. 

In addition, health care seems like a basic human right to me so I don't view accepting subsidized insurance as an ethical issue.  In Canada we are all covered at an extremely low cost for medical, but not dental.  Dental is covered by private insurance for those who have it, again at a very low cost.

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #109 on: February 25, 2014, 06:21:32 AM »
I see.  I can understand not applying for food stamps when you qualify but can manage without but coming from a country with universal health care I don't have the same view of medical coverage Wouldn't there be a significant financial risk if, say, surgery was was required? 

Gin1984

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #110 on: February 25, 2014, 06:50:39 AM »
Thanks Bruinguy.

That post is from 2009 which is why it may have been difficult to find.  So we know for sure that five years ago they had no medical insurance and we know that at approx. $36 000/year of income they qualify for no deductible health and dental at a cost of $100 per year for all seven children.

Assuming that they have not enrolled in the Nevada Check-up, why would they make that choice?  I'm not in the US so I don't understand the ins and outs of health care so perhaps I'm missing something?  To me it seems like this would be a poor choice given that, in the case of a serious illness, the family would receive treatment but be potentially bankrupted by the bills without this coverage in place.

I can understand why others might feel that this decision does not make sense and puts the family at risk.  Given the extremely low cost I don't think it is an issue of affordability, but rather a personal decision.  I just don't understand why unless it is part of a self-reliance ethos which, while somewhat admirable on some level, seems far too risky to me to adopt or condone when you have children in your care. 

In addition, health care seems like a basic human right to me so I don't view accepting subsidized insurance as an ethical issue.  In Canada we are all covered at an extremely low cost for medical, but not dental.  Dental is covered by private insurance for those who have it, again at a very low cost.
See now I see the problem here.  You are assuming the kids would get treatment without insurance.  That does not happen, often.  Doctors here refuse to see cash only patients often.  ERs stabilize and let you go, if you don't have insurance.  It boils down to the fact that you think that the kids would get treatment, and I know from working within the field that they would not.  They would often not get meds they need, etc.
And frankly, the difference is the child did not make the choice, the adult did.  You want to be an idiot and risk yourself, your problem, you risk a child in your care, that I have an issue with. 

Gin1984

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #111 on: February 25, 2014, 07:04:33 AM »
I see.  I can understand not applying for food stamps when you qualify but can manage without but coming from a country with universal health care I don't have the same view of medical coverage Wouldn't there be a significant financial risk if, say, surgery was was required?
Depends on why surgery was required.  If it was required so you don't die right then and there (appendix bursting) yes, now you have a significant financial cost but if it was say, something causing great pain and they don't know why?  And for people with insurance, they would do exploratory surgery to check X, Y and Z.  But for someone without insurance.  Sorry, you don't have insurance, can you you pay cash up front?  No financial risk, but your kid won't get treatment. 

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #112 on: February 25, 2014, 07:27:06 AM »
Yes, I was wondering about the appendicitis scenario.   My kids are healthy and haven't needed much health care apart from a broken finger in the past 15 years.  That said, there is always a risk of something - my nephew had cancer at nine.  I would not be comfortable not having health insurance for that reason.  I don't think it is a good choice to go without care when very affordable coverage is an option - unless I'm missing something.

BPA

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #113 on: February 25, 2014, 07:18:26 PM »
I think her kids have a lot to be thankful for. I would choose that family over many many others.  My impression is that her children are fortunate in many ways.

I agree.  Having grown up in a really abusive home, her children seem loved and well cared for.  The homeschooling (which in their case does seem to be of the really sheltered sort) and the potential for religious indoctrination are not for me, but I still think her children are in fortunate circumstances compared to many.

Interesting perspective about how the religious community can pull together, Serpentstooth.  Thanks for sharing it.

Simple Abundant Living

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #114 on: February 25, 2014, 09:56:28 PM »
Yes, I was wondering about the appendicitis scenario.   My kids are healthy and haven't needed much health care apart from a broken finger in the past 15 years.  That said, there is always a risk of something - my nephew had cancer at nine.  I would not be comfortable not having health insurance for that reason.  I don't think it is a good choice to go without care when very affordable coverage is an option - unless I'm missing something.

Primary Children's Medical Center serves the area of Utah, Nevada, Idaho and Wyoming. They may not publish the fact, but they would never turn away any child based on lack of ability to pay. We've always had great insurance for our kids, but out GI doc says they will even do transplants or chemo, at no charge, for kids who need it.

I would highly recommend getting the whole family covered if possible. LDS members are supposed to "be prepared"- food storage, updated job skills, etc. I think health insurance is part of that. They should get the kids covered, but it would be really disastrous if something happened to the mom or dad.

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #115 on: February 26, 2014, 08:03:57 AM »
I'm curious if they're getting coverage with the new Affordable Care Act--don't you have to get it or pay a fine?

MayDay

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #116 on: February 26, 2014, 10:32:51 AM »
For all those who are saying "but look at her huge garden, look at what she cans!".  Yes. That is true now.  It wasn't true when the market suddenly crashed and they had to not grocery shop for a year with no warning (at least from what I can gather reading her posts- she talked about there only fruit for the year being canned mandarin oranges and canned pears, and I can't remember what the vegetables were but it was one or two things, all canned). 

Now- I think they eat great.  I think it is great to eat seasonally.  But carefully planning and storing food to eat seasonally is a different scenario entirely than having to live for a year off of whatever happened to be in sale for 25 cents a can during a case sale. 


Carrie

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #117 on: February 26, 2014, 10:50:10 AM »
I have to say, I'm a little blown away by the criticism leveled at this woman who is doing what I thought most of us were striving for --- living frugally, only mindful spending, etc.
Of course, most mustachians make more money and are at impressive savings levels, but that just isn't where this family is AT THIS POINT in their journey.  Just think how awesome they'll be doing when those children are older and she can work outside the home (or more lucratively at home) and when her husband's work picks back up!  They have the living frugally thing down pat!

PintSizedMustachian

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #118 on: February 26, 2014, 01:17:23 PM »
For all those who are saying "but look at her huge garden, look at what she cans!".  Yes. That is true now.  It wasn't true when the market suddenly crashed and they had to not grocery shop for a year with no warning (at least from what I can gather reading her posts- she talked about there only fruit for the year being canned mandarin oranges and canned pears, and I can't remember what the vegetables were but it was one or two things, all canned). 

Now- I think they eat great.  I think it is great to eat seasonally.  But carefully planning and storing food to eat seasonally is a different scenario entirely than having to live for a year off of whatever happened to be in sale for 25 cents a can during a case sale.

But she wasn't living for a year off of whatever happened to be left in the pantry. The LDS church wants members to store at least three month's and ideally a full year's worth of food that your family will eat and that is nutritionally adequate. It's not random pantry flotsam; it's carefully planned to allow your family to survive off it. Which is seems like that's what she did and it worked. The food storage is enough to keep everyone alive until you can put into place stopgap measures, whether increasing your income or growing a garden or getting public assistance.

Do you really think the children are going to be in dire nutritional straits because of a year of canned fruits and vegetables? In the 1950's glory days of better living through chemicals, that's basically all the produce my father and uncle are for the better part of two DECADES. It's still more fruits and vegetables than many, if not most, American kids get on a daily basis. What do you want to do, haul in every parent who feeds their kid multiple Happy Meals in a week?

I have to disagree about the healthfulness of food from a Bishop's Storehouse. My parents relied on this for a year while I was growing up and, while it was nutritionally adequate, it was not particularly good for us. We ate a lot of dehydrated apple slices (high in sugar), starches like white rice & potato pearls (low in fiber, high in sodium), sugary canned fruits & canned veggies that were high in sodium. We also had to switch to powdered milk which none of us liked, so the only time we got calcium was when we drank it with hot cocoa. My mom relied a lot on starches in casseroles flavored with bouillion. A lot of it has to do with your cooking style (my parents never used the dried beans, which are super healthy), but it's cheap survival food. It's supposed to tide you over until you can get back on your feet; it's really not meant to be used all the time.

One downside of the Mormon storage thing is that my family members are CONSTANTLY eating this stuff because it goes bad. It's a waste to replace your whole stash every five years, so they are always eating down the oldest potato pearls & bags of white rice, which I really don't consider healthy.

Elaine

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #119 on: February 26, 2014, 01:29:22 PM »
I have to say, I'm a little blown away by the criticism leveled at this woman who is doing what I thought most of us were striving for --- living frugally, only mindful spending, etc.
Of course, most mustachians make more money and are at impressive savings levels, but that just isn't where this family is AT THIS POINT in their journey.  Just think how awesome they'll be doing when those children are older and she can work outside the home (or more lucratively at home) and when her husband's work picks back up!  They have the living frugally thing down pat!

Yeah I am too. I mean from a purely frugal angle she's doing something pretty amazing/old school. It seems like the default response for some people is criticism, and I think that become especially true when the person being criticized is doing something impressive. I mean, I personally don't believe in Mormonism even a tiny bit- that doesn't suddenly negate everything else she's doing. People are multifaceted, to expect that everyone would live up to your own personal moral standards seems at best naive and at worst self-centered.

Cassie

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #120 on: February 26, 2014, 03:20:42 PM »
Pint size Must: you are so right that eating out of the pantry is not healthy & the criticism again comes from the fact that they keep choosing to expand a family they can not afford. 

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #121 on: February 26, 2014, 03:55:52 PM »
Actually, I see no sign that they cannot afford the family they have:

1. they own their house
2. they pay their taxes which (at least in Canada) includes school taxes for which they may receive no benefit as homeschoolers (?)
3. the are healthy-looking and seem extremely happy
4. they own a vehicle
5. they own bikes
6. they have a lot of community involvement and activities
7. they pay for their medical care in whatever way they do - they mention midwives and a hospital visit for a broken arm

I'm not sure about the no fresh foods during that one year five years ago, but since then they eat a lot of garden produce.  More than most families.  They also eat a lot of beans.

The only thing I'm with you on as a potential issue is health insurance and I don't know if anything is changed since five years ago which is the last time they posted they did not have coverage.  This might have made more sense at the time as her husband made over $100,000 the previous year and then their income dropped - perhaps they could not afford premiums the next year if they are calculated on last years' income?  (I don't know how it works in the US) 

Again, if they are not enrolled it is not because they can't afford it - it is extremely affordable at their income level $100 a year for all seven children with no deductible for full medical and dental. 

If they are not enrolled currently it is for some other reason which may have something to do with not depending on government aid and having support through the LDS community in the way of doctors and fund raising if needed. I would be enrolled in their shoes as I would be very concerned about the risks - but I'm not Mormon.

I don't know if Obamacare impacts anything either.

Cassie

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #122 on: February 26, 2014, 04:07:42 PM »
I and many others have stated in previous posts why they can't afford such a large family. Nothing against large families either.  I seriously doubt an agreement will ever be reached about this-half of us think this way and half think they are fine. To each his own.

ruthiegirl

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #123 on: February 26, 2014, 04:56:17 PM »
This thread is an excellent reminder of why I will never start a blog. 


reginna

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #124 on: February 26, 2014, 05:07:27 PM »
This thread is an excellent reminder of why I will never start a blog.

Blahaha ruthiegirl. I agree!

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #125 on: February 26, 2014, 05:31:38 PM »
This thread is an excellent reminder of why I will never start a blog.

Blahaha ruthiegirl. I agree!

Yep.

Josiecat

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #126 on: February 26, 2014, 07:58:06 PM »
http://theprudenthomemaker.com/index.php/about/living-on-food-storage

On this page she talks about her daughter breaking her arm and she said 'we do not have insurance'

minimalist

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #127 on: February 26, 2014, 08:53:18 PM »
I like the frugality tips, but I get the impression that they are living paycheck to paycheck (or worse at times), which I find off-putting coming from a Mustachian mindset.

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #128 on: February 26, 2014, 09:12:07 PM »
http://theprudenthomemaker.com/index.php/about/living-on-food-storage

On this page she talks about her daughter breaking her arm and she said 'we do not have insurance'

Yes.  That has already been identified. Your point?

totoro

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #129 on: February 26, 2014, 09:18:36 PM »
I like the frugality tips, but I get the impression that they are living paycheck to paycheck (or worse at times), which I find off-putting coming from a Mustachian mindset.

I agree they seem to be living without an emergency fund right now.  They are living on their income though and are not using credit. I would not be comfortable that way but they are in much better shape than many of the case studies posted here of families with kids.

PintSizedMustachian

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #130 on: February 27, 2014, 01:58:34 PM »
I'm really surprised by all the positivity! In my mind, what it comes to is this: these folks were barely breaking even & just squeaking by on the generosity of their friends, family, & community. During this period of barely making ends meet, they decided to add more expenses. In every other case study where people aren't saving, the advice is usually decrease expenses or earn more money. If I posted a thread about how I was spending all my income, didn't have a safety net, didn't have insurance, & was considering going on a vacation to Bali, I would get ridiculous amounts of incredulous comments.

The only difference I'm seeing is that some people place more value on children or being a stay at home parent, which somehow gets The Prudent Homemaker a pass for being financially reckless. They can afford their children in the absolute, bare-minimum sense of the word, but considering this is the MMM forums, I'm shocked that there's so much approval. I mean, we have threads where people are installing bidets & being glad about saving toilet paper, MMM showers 2-3 times a week & saves water, folks who spend tons of time couponing to get free supplies! Then we have the Prudent Homemaker who has kind of "retired" to take care of her kids with no safety net beyond a year's worth of canned food.

Lastly, why is there so little discussion of the husband? Couldn't he step up & be the primary caregiver while she got a job? Her stepping out of the home to work doesn't mean that those poor children will be abandoned to the evil influence of outside caretakers if Dad stepped up at home.


BPA

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #131 on: February 27, 2014, 04:37:31 PM »
I'm really surprised by all the positivity! In my mind, what it comes to is this: these folks were barely breaking even & just squeaking by on the generosity of their friends, family, & community. During this period of barely making ends meet, they decided to add more expenses. In every other case study where people aren't saving, the advice is usually decrease expenses or earn more money. If I posted a thread about how I was spending all my income, didn't have a safety net, didn't have insurance, & was considering going on a vacation to Bali, I would get ridiculous amounts of incredulous comments.

The only difference I'm seeing is that some people place more value on children or being a stay at home parent, which somehow gets The Prudent Homemaker a pass for being financially reckless. They can afford their children in the absolute, bare-minimum sense of the word, but considering this is the MMM forums, I'm shocked that there's so much approval. I mean, we have threads where people are installing bidets & being glad about saving toilet paper, MMM showers 2-3 times a week & saves water, folks who spend tons of time couponing to get free supplies! Then we have the Prudent Homemaker who has kind of "retired" to take care of her kids with no safety net beyond a year's worth of canned food.

Lastly, why is there so little discussion of the husband? Couldn't he step up & be the primary caregiver while she got a job? Her stepping out of the home to work doesn't mean that those poor children will be abandoned to the evil influence of outside caretakers if Dad stepped up at home.

I guess I just don't see that it's my business at all how she runs her life.

It's not like she posted a case study here and asked our advice.

I follow a frugal lifestyle in my own way and don't expect everyone to be like me.  At least she's not like the ridiculously spendy people who post here about how they can't possibly save any more money because they NEED x,y,z and cause the rest of us to scratch our heads. 


NeverWasACornflakeGirl

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #132 on: February 28, 2014, 04:50:32 AM »
I guess I just don't see that it's my business at all how she runs her life.

It's not like she posted a case study here and asked our advice.

Just for the sake of argument, if she posts all of this on her blog, putting it all out there, isn't she inviting comment?

Yet another reason for NOT writing a blog, if you ask me.  ;-)

BPA

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #133 on: February 28, 2014, 05:41:52 AM »
I guess I just don't see that it's my business at all how she runs her life.

It's not like she posted a case study here and asked our advice.

Just for the sake of argument, if she posts all of this on her blog, putting it all out there, isn't she inviting comment?

Yet another reason for NOT writing a blog, if you ask me.  ;-)

:)  Sure she is.  But it's like all the complainypants who get all over MMM.  Don't live like them if you don't want to.  If it works for them and not you, that's okay.  Issue resolved.

Cassie

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #134 on: February 28, 2014, 10:54:50 AM »
Pint Size Must: I totally agree with you. If Dad is not taking a salary his business is not working so he should close it and get a JOB!

Simple Abundant Living

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #135 on: February 28, 2014, 01:33:20 PM »
For the people that read her blog and enjoy her tips and ideas...

Why not send her an amazon gift card?  She doesn't make much off the website. If you have gotten use of her information and you have the means, I think she would appreciate a thank you!

Her email is:

brandy@theprudenthomemaker.com

Mortgage Free Mike

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #136 on: March 04, 2014, 12:37:08 PM »
I'm so over this lady, but I wish her and her family the best.

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #137 on: March 04, 2014, 12:54:15 PM »
Ever since this thread introduced me to her blog, I keep thinking about it! I keep asking myself what The Prudent Homemaker would do/think. Sort of to remind myself (a) that I have it pretty easy in life, all things considered and (b) I should be less lazy. I mean, if she can manage all those children and still get all that stuff done, I should be able to manage a mere TWO children and get (less) stuff done, too.

mm1970

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Re: Who else reads The Prudent Homemaker?
« Reply #138 on: March 15, 2014, 02:01:05 PM »
I'm really surprised by all the positivity! In my mind, what it comes to is this: these folks were barely breaking even & just squeaking by on the generosity of their friends, family, & community. During this period of barely making ends meet, they decided to add more expenses. In every other case study where people aren't saving, the advice is usually decrease expenses or earn more money. If I posted a thread about how I was spending all my income, didn't have a safety net, didn't have insurance, & was considering going on a vacation to Bali, I would get ridiculous amounts of incredulous comments.

The only difference I'm seeing is that some people place more value on children or being a stay at home parent, which somehow gets The Prudent Homemaker a pass for being financially reckless. They can afford their children in the absolute, bare-minimum sense of the word, but considering this is the MMM forums, I'm shocked that there's so much approval. I mean, we have threads where people are installing bidets & being glad about saving toilet paper, MMM showers 2-3 times a week & saves water, folks who spend tons of time couponing to get free supplies! Then we have the Prudent Homemaker who has kind of "retired" to take care of her kids with no safety net beyond a year's worth of canned food.

Lastly, why is there so little discussion of the husband? Couldn't he step up & be the primary caregiver while she got a job? Her stepping out of the home to work doesn't mean that those poor children will be abandoned to the evil influence of outside caretakers if Dad stepped up at home.
It would be one thing to not have a safety net, etc., if you were living on the dole.  And they aren't.  I can't speak for whether they now have insurance or not.  Which is worse - not having insurance and paying out of pocket with all those kids?  Or accepting taxpayer funded state insurance and continuing to have children?

The fact of the matter is - as far as I can tell - the children are well cared for.  They have a good diet.  They are fed, housed, and clothed.

Her husband already has a job.  Why should she get one?  After not working for X number of years, do you think she could earn more than he currently does?  How easy would it be for her to get a decent paying job after being out of the work force?  How easy would it be for her husband, at 50, to get a new job?  And doing what?

In my mind, she gets a pass for being the queen of frugality.  She's not wasting money on frivolous items.  I have learned quite a lot from her site.