Author Topic: Composting in the city  (Read 3428 times)

artistache

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Composting in the city
« on: April 19, 2014, 09:13:53 AM »
Considering beginning to compost in a small city apartment. I can drop off vegetable/grain food waste at a nearby farmer's market weekly. Any tips for how to do this well? What do other urban composters do with "greasy" or meat food scraps that the city won't compost?

phred

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2014, 10:17:47 AM »
meat scraps are fed to the worms; it's called vermiculture

dragoncar

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2014, 12:08:24 PM »
That's strange the city won't compost meat scraps.

neophyte

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2014, 03:46:30 PM »
We keep our compost bucket in the freezer so it doesn't get stinky.   

Thegoblinchief

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2014, 06:48:28 PM »
In an apartment, a worm bin is relatively easy, but there are items that even worms don't like from what I've read.

My city just served me a code compliance violation for my open air compost bin. Apparently they consider it a rat-feeding area. My hacked solution was to buy some large black plastic trash cans and drill holes in the bottom, sides, and lid. Makes it more annoying to aerate, but $15 per bin is a lot better than $80+ for the rotating ones.

Nords

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2014, 10:51:13 PM »
Apparently they consider it a rat-feeding area.
We called that "organic aeration"!

RealCanadianSavings

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #6 on: April 19, 2014, 11:22:16 PM »
I had a double bucket system when I lived in a city apartment with a deck. The inside bucket had holes and would drain, when it came time to take it to the farmers market, I just put it in the second bucket. I also used an old ice cream bucket on my counter too. That was handy when I was to lazy to move it to the deck until the next day or so.

JT

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2014, 03:35:44 AM »
I reckon a worm farm would suit your purposes well.

They don't take up much space and the only things they don't like is stuff like garlic, onions and citrus.

You could sell the castings for fertiliser to garden farmers.

Worms are great!

RetiredAt63

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2014, 05:14:29 AM »
Worm castings are great for African violets and most other houseplants (just not orchids).  If you don't have house plants, find a gardening group.  Its members would appreciate your worm castings.

Meat and fat do not usually go into home compost piles because they do attract animals.

artistache

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2014, 07:36:12 PM »
I like the double-bucket system, and the freezer tip.  I'm going to look into worm casting. I do have houseplants, tons, but literally no outdoor space beyond window-sills. It's a small building, though, and I could probably put something out by our trash cans. Would something like that attract cats?

greaper007

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Re: Composting in the city
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2014, 08:44:06 PM »
In an apartment, a worm bin is relatively easy, but there are items that even worms don't like from what I've read.

My city just served me a code compliance violation for my open air compost bin. Apparently they consider it a rat-feeding area. My hacked solution was to buy some large black plastic trash cans and drill holes in the bottom, sides, and lid. Makes it more annoying to aerate, but $15 per bin is a lot better than $80+ for the rotating ones.

I have a 3 bin open air compost bin.   I had a mouse living in my well rotted section all winter, I thought it was pretty cool and just left him alone.    Now I've noticed a few cats hanging around the bin and haven't seen the mouse for awhile...

I'd hate to have to get one of the rotating bins, it seems like a real hassle.    I just punch a few airholes in my active bin a couple times a week and call it a day.    Today it seemed hot enough to cook an egg in.