Author Topic: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation  (Read 2083 times)

Villanelle

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COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« on: June 16, 2018, 06:01:24 AM »
Soooo, it looks like we may be moving to Omaha.  Far from a sure thing, but I'd say there's a 75% chance this will be our next home.

Currently we are overseas, and our current cars will be sold here.  We have a 2000 Toyota Echo in storage (on employer's dime, not our own!).  They will deliver it to Omaha for us but we are probably ready for a new (to us!) car.  We are hoping to live in downtown Omaha, and while it's hard to get a feel for things online, it seems like everything would be very walkable, so I could likely be car-less. (I probably won't be working, or will be working PT from home and/or the nearest cafe.)  DH would need the car to go to work nearly every day.

However!, I'm worried as hell about the cold.  Facepunch all you want, but I don't do well in cold.  We lived in Southern Germany, and that was a struggle for me, no matter how much I tried to acclimate.  And it seems Omaha is much colder and much snowier.  Is it realistic to have no car there?  For a fancypants wuss like myself, to include nearly all errands? 

And I know very little about driving in ice and snow.  My dream cars are things like a Honda Fit or a Yaris.  Death trap in ice and snow, or just fine?

Also, how the hell do you dress for really cold weather??  (Yes, I'm getting ahead of myself since this isn't 100% yet, but I'm anxious and when I'm anxious, I research and plan.  I don't plan on making any purchases until if/when this becomes I sure thing.)  In Germany, where even the cold days were not as cold as what Omaha gets,  when I had to be outside for more than just parking lot ----> destination, I wore leggings or tights under jeans or fleece pants, and fleece shirts with silk or other cold weather base layers, often with the fleece double up, then either my thinsulate-lined coat or my down coat.  (Preferred the latter because it was less bulky, but also slight less warm.)  And then of course scarf, hat, wool socks, gloves or mittens, ear covers, etc.  Often, much to my DH's amazement, spending a couple hours outside while I was at maximum-bundle would have me so cold that even the skin on my thighs was frigid to the touch for a good long while after I came back inside.  How does one dress even warmer than this?  I see $1000 shearling or canada goose down coats.  Clearly I don't want to spend that much, but are those meaningfully warmer than my LL Bean down coat?

Please help me not die.

SilveradoBojangles

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2018, 08:06:24 AM »
Hello - I am a cold weather wimp (happiest in the tropics) who moved to Michigan last summer. Our first winter was long and unusually snowy, with a few weeks in the negatives, culminating in the coldest April on record in over 100 years (yay). But I made it! I even went outside occasionally. We live in a walkable town, and we have a single car, a 11-year old fit. Some things that helped:

- Having a warm house allows you to build up a warm core that helps propel you to your next destination. I found I was warmer on average here than in cold damp parts of the west coast because the insulation in the houses is better. Also, the dryer cold really does feel warmer, weirdly.
- A MI friend recommended the merino socks and base layers that Costco sells. They are great - $8 and warm without being bulky. I wore them pretty much every day.
- I bought a kickass pair of wool mittens that are the best. And I would put those hand warmer things in them. Or wear gloves under them.
- I bought really good snow shoes (around this time last year, when they were on sale). You want ones that are easy to get on and off, are furry or otherwise insulated, and have vibram or green diamond soles (they are the only ones that actually are non-slip on ice). I think the ones I have are from Sperry.
- shoveling snow really warms you up.
- We put snow tires on the fit, and it made me feel much better about driving in snow/ice. Honestly, the fit did fine for city/highway driving. However, we have a lot of dirt roads around here just a few miles out of town, and I tried to avoid those because I didn't feel super comfortable on them.

OtherJen

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2018, 08:25:48 AM »
Iím a cold weather wimp and lifelong Michigan resident. I heartily second the Costco wool socks. Sometimes I layer a pair of thin socks under them. Layers are your friend. Fleece-lined tights are great under jeans. For outer layers, Iím a fan of insulated parkas with hoods. Thick, lined mittens are warmer than gloves but give you less dexterity. Honestly, though, I have trouble regulating my body temperature in cold weather and spend as little time outdoors in winter as possible. Itís how I get through the my least favorite season. Our other seasons are beautiful, at least.

We always buy the big plastic sheeting kits to seal our windows and added extra insulation in the attic. I drive a Prius and have never had problems with it, but I live in a decent inner-ring suburb where the streets get plowed fairly soon after snowstorms. The roads are usually in better shape than the sidewalks.

misshathaway

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2018, 09:49:38 AM »
I live in the Northeast and we just had a pretty awful winter. And then it was cold and rainy right through to a couple of weeks ago when it was still in the 50's a lot. I am thin and also have Reynauds, which makes my fingers turn white and get stiff when the ambient temp is under 70! I only feel warm in winter when the indoor temp is 74 or above.

What has helped me:

- Keeping the indoor temp 70 or above. Next winter it will be 74. Damn the oil bill. I had whole house cellulose insulation put in last year and it really helped with holding a warm temp and not having drafts. Second what another poster said about being completely warm before you go outside.

- +1 on all the other Costco mentions. Their top and bottom long underwear is so thin you think it won't work but it does. Bottoms fit fine under jeans. Turtleneck not folded down is always my top layer in winter to block wind. Then hoody and insulated parka with hood. A parka with a lined hood is essential for me.

- Best investment for snow shoveling was a full body insulated suit. It weighs 8 pounds so it's like carrying your house outside with you, but I can go out in a blizzard to shovel and not feel it. I have Aramark SteelGuardô 30į Below Insulated Coveralls size XS.

I have a Toyota Yaris with good snow tires and it does fine on suburban roads and highways. I don't drive very fast in snow though.

You'll be OK if everything that can get cold is properly covered and you are moving when you are out in the cold.


ltt

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2018, 10:11:53 AM »
Grew up about 30 minutes outside of Omaha, and still travel into Omaha quite often. Downtown Omaha is quite walkable, depending on where you want to walk to, and I would tell you that city leaders try to do their best to attract new business/industry.  The Henry Doorly Zoo is a world-class zoo that only just keeps getting better.  Warren Buffett lives in Omaha, and the annual Berkshire Hathaway meeting brings thousands of people to the city.  The College World Series starts today.  They are revitalizing parts of downtown, and it is great to see.   

However, Omaha is majorly spread out.  And my guess is for some of the types of things you might want (such as shopping, groceries, doctors, you may want to have a car.)  They do have metro area bus service; I'm just not familiar with it.

If you dislike the cold, this will not be the place for you.  As I've gotten older, it has become more intolerable.  Five to six months out of the year are downright cold, with January typically being quite brutal weather here.  There is what is called the January "thaw," but it doesn't hang around for very long until the temperatures become unbearable again. Some winters, and I've only ran into this a few times in my lifetime, it will be in the 50s and 60s in December.  But that is rare.  Typically, once the snow arrives, it stays.  Summers tend to be hot and humid.

A big problem you will have is ice, and it is difficult, if not impossible, to drive on.  The mayor of Omaha does a very good job about getting the sand/salt trucks out.  That is one of her main priorities during the winter.  Those small dream cars you mention do not go well on ice/snow.  We have owned Corolla's for years, and they do not do well in the snow.  Typically, as you go out of downtown Omaha to the west, the streets are slightly hilly.  You will want to make sure you have dependable (and that's the key) transportation.

As far as clothes, layering is a necessity, depending on how cold it gets and how far you are going.  Winter boots (with a fur-type lining), gloves (with some type of fur-type lining), a hat (my husband wears one of those hats with a lot of soft fur on the inside which he loves) will be a necessity.  Also, as for a winter coat, I wear a longer coat (that has a softer, fur-type lining) because I don't like to be cold either.  I also wear long, bulky sweaters (almost a duster style) in the winter in our house to keep warm. 

« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 10:15:54 AM by ltt »

Sailor Sam

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #5 on: June 16, 2018, 10:32:35 AM »
I live in Maine, and endorse all things merino wool. I also like wearing lined pants, instead of multiple layers on my legs. Duluth Trading Co. and Carrharts both make very nice fleece lined pants for women.

For the car, consider having a block heater. You'll also need dedicated winter tires, and possibly an extra set of rims, to make the 2/year swap less annoying. I also recommend a 1/week wash at a heated carwash designed to sluice down the undercarriage. Otherwise the salt will eat your car.

If your not versed in driving on snow and ice, it's a good idea to get a little practice. Go to a parking lot, or such, and practice driving in powder and skidding on ice. It's both fun and informative. 

Lady SA

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2018, 12:02:22 PM »
I live in a very frigid midwest state and it is not uncommon to see -30 degrees plus loads of ice and snow.

I have a tiny, crappy beater car, 2 wheel drive, super light, pretty much the exact wrong thing to have when driving on ice and snow. BUT, when I put snow tires on? I can practically climb trees with them. Snow tires make a HUGE difference and in my opinion, are even better than having 4 wheel drive. The grip is hugely superior. So, get whatever kind of sensible car you want, and simply invest in snow tires and you won't have a problem. This means you would have 2 sets of tires (one for warm summer, one for winter), but it is worth it!!

Another driving tip, you can take a defensive driving class and it will teach you how to drive if your car ever starts sliding. Also, states/cities with winters are generally very well equipped to handle snow and ice and have things pretty well in hand within a few hours. So if you can have some flexibility to delay an errand until the roads are clear, that would be your best bet.

For clothing, everyone already hit the big points. I would just say that you shouldn't be afraid of bulky jackets. I get cold SUPER easy, and I got myself a 850 fill down jacket and I look like the michelin marshmallow man. Do I care? Not at all. It doesn't hamper my movement at all, and I'm warm. Oh, and wear long, athletic wool socks constantly. I have the kind that go up to mid-calf and in a variety of different thicknesses and patterns. I literally wear them everyday from about end of september to beginning of may.

edit - one thing to note about layering - the idea is to trap warm air layers next to your body. That means, if you are wearing leggings under jeans (I presume jeans are tight), there is no air pocket to be warmed by your body heat. So no wonder your thighs are freezing! The "looser" the layers, and the better the material is at trapping air, the warmer you will be. I would also look at getting a thigh-length parka, as that helps trap that much more air all the way from your neck to your knees. And on windy days, you can add a wind/waterproof shell on top. I have a larger rain-jacket that I can put over top of my bulky down jacket and within 10 seconds I'm sweating even in -30. This is coming from a huge cold-baby, so you can do it!
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 12:09:55 PM by Lady SA »

Allie

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #7 on: June 16, 2018, 12:04:56 PM »
Warm weather lover from Alaska here.  Here are my cold weather tips:

The merino base layer and down over layer is my go to.  I have some of the Costco merino, but it isn't as thick as some of the smart wool layers you can find.  It's great for in and out of heated buildings, but when I'm out for long periods and it's really cold, I switch over to the heavier smartwool.  It's more spendy, but 2nd hand or on sale it isn't so bad, and it lasts forever. 

I have a smartwool coat, which has a slim profile and a down Eddie Bauer coat (I think they ended up being $150 each on sale) if it's chilly, just the wool.  If it's cold, just the down.  If it's super cold, wool under down.  Between the two, I'm ready for just about any weather.

Darn tough socks are also spendy, but super warm and have a lifetime warranty.  I discovered these on this forum!  I love tall, ugg type boots as slippers!  At home, if your house is cool or the floors are cold, it makes a huge difference.

I like to keep my house cold, because then I can layer up and not have to worry about putting on and taking off tons of clothes as I move between indoor and outdoor environments.  Some mornings, I'm just chilly, but about 15-20 min of really good exercise, like running, really makes a difference in my internal temp.

It's not ideal to be a hot weather lover in a cold weather place, but it's manageable!

letired

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #8 on: June 16, 2018, 01:23:56 PM »
+1 to all things wool. I'm also a giant baby about the cold, which is why I moved to Texas, but I still end up in the colder northern climes during the holidays, etc.

One thing that helps me a LOT is oversized wool sweaters. It keeps me covered at all my joints, which makes a big difference in how warm I feel. I prefer 100% cashmere since it makes me itch less where it touches my skin and I like that it's softer, but also you should be wearing the relevant base layer(s) underneath it so it shouldn't matter the exact type of wool too much. You can make out like a bandit on ebay.

The other part of the cold-dressing strategy is to not overdress. If you overdress and sweat, you will end up colder than ever. Even though it's tempting to wear Every Single Thing, refrain and aim to under-dress slightly and pack along an extra layer until you've figured it out. Under-dressing a little also lets you get a little chilly sometimes and helps you eventually acclimate, unpleasant though it may be.

And finally, make note of which parts getting cold make you most unhappy or feel most cold. For me, It's my back/waist, ankles, neck, and sometimes wrists. Also I can handle my legs getting cold much more than my upper half. So I wear wool socks and full-length pants that cover my ankles, long sweaters or tops, and lots of scarves. Having my fingers or toes go cold generally doesn't bother me, so I don't worry too much. When I'm shlepping around the house, walking on the cold floor bothers me, so I wear slippers all winter.

DreamFIRE

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2018, 01:36:54 PM »
I lived in a part of Canada thatís a frozen hellscape for half the year where sometimes the air can burn your exposed skin within 10 minutes. I also get cold very easily, and even I can be 100% comfortable outside all winter long for many hours because I have the right gear. Gear matters.

I donít bother with the Canada Goose coats because a layer system works better and is more comfortable, plus you can layer up and layer down depending on the weather. I only wear the full system on the very very coldest of days.

I had a patient recently who moved here from Spain and I gave her a list of what layers to buy and sheís had no problems adjusting to the cold here. People are always shocked that she doesnít complain about the winters.

My layer system
-base layer
-100% merino wool layer
-fleece layer
-down layer with no seams that go all the way through (this is important)
-wind proof/waterproof top layer, preferably with venting zippers because you can easily overheat with all of these layers if you are moving around a lot, even in -40
-fleece lined leggings
-thick merino wool socks
-a balaclava for frostbite warning days or freezing rain days where the rain hurts your skin
-merino wool hat
-Bogs boots for day to day or winter running shoes for if Iím out walking

I used to hate winter and obsess about moving somewhere warmer until I invested in good gear and a car starter, and now I actually like winter.

I live in the midwest and a single down coat with a hood, scarf, and gloves gets me by on the coldest days (rarely colder than -10 F, usually >0) wearing them over my regular clothes, maybe a sweater, just doing my usual activities of coming and going, but I do love my long range remote car starter.  Since I have to park a long way from the entry way at work, it makes it even better on cold days to have the long range starter and walk all that way in the cold and get into a car that's already warming up.  Installed it myself -  totally worth it.
« Last Edit: June 16, 2018, 01:42:46 PM by DreamFIRE »

Trifele

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2018, 02:07:03 PM »
I grew up in the upper midwest and still have family in Omaha. 

Big yes to the merino wool base layer.  Wear it right against your skin.  LL Bean has some good stuff, in addition to the other sellers mentioned above.  Add middle layers as needed.  A down coat over that will keep you warm.  I recommend you buy a pair of Neos Navigator overshoes -- best possible "boots" available for cold, snow, and ice.  These are high tech mukluks, and Neos makes the best.  They are good -- for real -- down to -40 degrees.   

Omaha is pretty much flat.  You'll be fine in winter with a front wheel drive car.  Put snow tires on all four wheels.  Take the car to a parking lot the first time there is ice, and play with it.  You will get the hang of how the car behaves.

Last comment -- the winter will wear on you.  If the budget allows, plan a trip away every January/February.

Good luck!  Omaha is great -- full of nice people.
 
« Last Edit: June 20, 2018, 02:07:28 PM by Trifele »

OtherJen

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2018, 02:27:54 PM »
Hello - I am a cold weather wimp (happiest in the tropics) who moved to Michigan last summer. Our first winter was long and unusually snowy, with a few weeks in the negatives, culminating in the coldest April on record in over 100 years (yay).

I'm so sorry. I've been here for 40 years, and last winter was the one that almost made me throw in the towel. April was a cruel joke.

gaja

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2018, 03:04:40 PM »
Greetings from Norway, where there is no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothing.

This is how we dress our children, who play outside all day, year round:

Good shoes and a warm hat are essential. If your feet and head are cold, you will be miserable. These are the ultimate shoes for really cold weather: https://www.topazofnorway.com/product-category/women/womensboots/ Don't know about the fancy modern options, but the sealskin ones have been around for years, and are BIFL.

Wool hats are nice, but if you have some windy days, they are not enough. Then you want some sort of trapper hat: https://toughoutfitters.com/products/tough-headwear-trapper-hat-with-faux-fur-ushanka-bomber-hat-for-winter-style-waterproof-shell-one-size-fits-most
If you can get hold of a Sami reindeer skin hat, you will never be cold again: https://img.letgo.com/images/7d/70/64/10/7d706410a13dc7c01e4f67473141d564.jpeg?impolicy=img_900

In the same photo as above, of the sami outfit, notice how the coat (pesk) goes down to the knees. Unless you are going for a snow suit, that is what you are looking for. It should fit quite loosely, so you can trap warm air between your body and the outer layer. That will also allow you to layer more wool underneath. For the same reason, I recommend wool tunics or dresses, rather than shorter sweaters. Just make sure you have a windproof outer layer, otherwise all that nice warm air is lost.

For the coldest days, fleece is not your friend. Only wool on wool will do. The extremists include woollen underpants and bras, I think that is taking it a step too far. Storebought thin merino is nice enough for the cool days, but homeknitted thicker wool is better for the really cold ones, since it is fluffier and traps more insulating air. If you don't like knitting, look for something like this: https://www.lanullva.no/ulltoy-dame or https://woolpower.se/en/produkt/crewneck-200-2/
Merino isn't necessarily the warmest wool type, it is just a well known brand. Cashmere is extremely warm compared to size. Very pricey, but you can often find decent cashmere sweaters second hand, if you are willing to deal with dated designs and colors, or maybe fix a small hole. I've bought some from ebay. Wool from spślsau (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sp%C3%A6lsau) is also warmer than merino, but terribly itchy. (Oh, the childhood memories...).

Hands: Gloves are nice if it is not too cold, but when the temperature really drops, you want mittens. Preferrably the sort with a windbreaker and a wool layer.

neck: For the kids, we knit or buy something like this: https://image.sportsmansguide.com/adimgs/l/2/205852_ts.jpg
Adults usually only buy the "tube" version. For more advice on gaiters: http://backpackingmastery.com/top-picks/best-neck-gaiter.html If you are still cold with a thin gaiter on, you can layer it with a thicker scarf, or preferrably a shawl. Thicker is not necessarily better in shawls. My favorite are the Faroese double lace shawls. Takes forever to knit, but are extremely warm: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/5f/dc/7b/5fdc7bd1755cf14bd3aeb4f6e08eca4c.jpg

gaja

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #13 on: June 16, 2018, 04:47:14 PM »
^^^

I donít even remotely agree with you about fleece. Fleece and wool have different properties, but to say that fleece is bad as part of an ultra cold system seems downright wrong to me, and my country gets just as cold if not colder than yours. My city was colder than Mars several times this past winter and my fleece served me very well and is a key part of my system as well as my DHís who bikes/runs to and from work all winter in all weather, and he wears *only* a heavy fleece and a windproof/waterproof layer over his work clothes.

I will clarify that my merino wool hat has a fleece lining as well, and my down layer has a tight hood. I would never depend on a wool hat alone in extreme cold.

But yeah, in the end, itís all about a good layering. I just absolutely refuse to agree that my layering system isnít good for extreme cold when itís served me extremely well in some of the coldest days anywhere on the planet short of Antarctica and I make a point of spending time outside on the coldest days.

Oh, and my family is from Denmark, so I was raised with the same saying about ďno such thing as bad weather, just bad clothingĒ.

When you get into the extreme temperatures, clothing choices border on religion. The wool on wool people will never agree with the techno clothes people. Everyone have to test  it out for themselves, and make a choice based on what works for them.

kimmarg

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #14 on: June 16, 2018, 05:13:47 PM »
I live in Maine, and endorse all things merino wool. I also like wearing lined pants, instead of multiple layers on my legs. Duluth Trading Co. and Carrharts both make very nice fleece lined pants for women.

For the car, consider having a block heater. You'll also need dedicated winter tires, and possibly an extra set of rims, to make the 2/year swap less annoying. I also recommend a 1/week wash at a heated carwash designed to sluice down the undercarriage. Otherwise the salt will eat your car.

If your not versed in driving on snow and ice, it's a good idea to get a little practice. Go to a parking lot, or such, and practice driving in powder and skidding on ice. It's both fun and informative.

I also live in Maine and second the fleece lined pants.

Omaha is not as cold as Maine and I don't have a block heater here so I think you'd be fine. It's sometimes slow to turn over on the coldest nights of the year.  Winter tires are excellent!

kimmarg

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #15 on: June 16, 2018, 05:15:00 PM »
And I know very little about driving in ice and snow.  My dream cars are things like a Honda Fit or a Yaris.  Death trap in ice and snow, or just fine?

I drive a Honda Fit in Maine where we just had 120 consecutive days of snow cover. I love me car. Buy good snow tires and it works just as well as any fancy pants SUV.

Goldielocks

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #16 on: June 16, 2018, 05:21:04 PM »
Get the car.  With remote start / battery warmer (if you park outside).   If you don't like cold, errands like groceries are really going to suck until you are used to it.  You should be able to walk to work just fine, though.

Anon in Alaska

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2018, 04:12:08 AM »
If your state allows it you should get studded tires.

(If your state does not allow studded tires then they are dumb. Fixing the extra road wear is cheaper than dealing with all the extra accidents.)

Maenad

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2018, 10:50:25 AM »
I've spent almost my entire life in Minnesota (and I agree with others that this past April was a cruel joke), and DH and I go hunting in November, so we've sat still for hours in cold weather. I'll ask our buddy about the specifics around his neoprene boots, but they're warm and toasty down to -60F. When we go out hunting we like to wear the SmartWool socks specifically designed for hunters, and use hand/boot warmers. You can get the warmers at any outdoorsy store that caters to hunters, put a pair of those on your socks under your boots, and another pair inside your mittens, and you'll be a happy camper.

tyrannostache

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #19 on: June 20, 2018, 11:14:31 AM »
I live in the very frozen North of the US. I'm going to sound like a brand shill here, but I want to anti-recommend the Costco merino layers and wool socks. Yeah, they're cheap, but they're not nearly as warm or as tightly knit as Smartwool or Icebreaker base layers or socks. I'd also add Darn Tough socks. This was highlighted for me this winter. One chilly morning this winter as I stumbled out of bed, I pulled on one Costco sock and one Darn Tough sock. I was really surprised at how much colder the Costco foot was. I wear my Costco socks pretty regularly, but not when it's really cold.

Personally, I think SmartWool socks have gone down in quality over the last 10 tears. My newer socks are wearing out faster. For that much money, I want them to last. I switched to Darn Tough and have been happy.

You might also consider a two-layer sock approach--a thin wool, silk, or synthetic sock next to the skin, and a thicker wool sock on the outside. This is my go-to when it's really really cold. I wear these under vasque winter boots for my walk to work or walking the dog, and then switch to wool clogs inside the office or house.

I also love a good Patagonia capilene baselayer. Silk feels nice, but I don't find it very warm.

peeps_be_peeping

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #20 on: June 20, 2018, 11:42:01 AM »
Lifelong Alaskan here, and I echo the sentiment about bad weather and bad clothing... I have found that most "cold weather" clothing and boots at stores like LLBean are meant for mild winter weather down to about 25F and do not perform in colder temps regardless of the manufacturers' claims. For example, "pac" style boots and insulated rubber boots just are not warm; I don't care that Sorel claims its boots are suitable down to -40F. That's plain BS. Iditarod mushers don't wear Sorels.

Other posters have covered the big picture - down, wool, layering, mittens instead of gloves, etc. For your feet look at Steger mukluks or ice fishing specific boots like https://www.cabelas.com/product/CABELAS-TRANS-ALASKA/2498570.uts?slotId=4. Winter boots should be bigger than your regular size to allow for extra sock layers and air circulation. I double or triple up on down parkas if necessary. I would also add a pair of insulated overpants to your outfit. They aren't going to flatter your figure but staying warm is not a fashion show. https://www.montbell.us/products/disp.php?cat_id=25044&p_id=2301305&gen_cd=2. If you are truly committed to warmth get a qiviut hat/muffler set. The underfur of the musk ox is softer and warmer by weight than cashmere and feels amazing.

Looking at the clothing of indigenous people to cold climates can give you ideas too. People with thousands of years of experience living in cold know what they are doing. It is not always possible to emulate their clothing because they aren't available off the shelf but the principles of warmth are universal.

lizzzi

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #21 on: June 20, 2018, 12:09:52 PM »
I have to walk my dog outside all winter--all weathers, four or five times a day--and it can be dangerously icy. I swear by my Stabilicer Maxx ice grippers. Other residents of our complex use Yak Trax or something similar.

Villanelle

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #22 on: June 22, 2018, 04:50:22 AM »
Thanks for all the tips.  Suddenly, Omaha is mostly off the table, so it looks like I won't have to use them, but anything could happen.

misshathaway

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Re: COLD weather! Help with clothing, transportation
« Reply #23 on: June 22, 2018, 06:31:14 AM »
Thanks for all the tips.  Suddenly, Omaha is mostly off the table, so it looks like I won't have to use them, but anything could happen.

Congrats! I think many people benefitted. This had been the BEST thread for cold-weather gear ideas.