Author Topic: Coffee Snob Set Up  (Read 10791 times)

wealthviahealth

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Coffee Snob Set Up
« on: December 03, 2015, 07:34:17 AM »
We all have our areas where we splurge more on our budget.
Mine is coffee but I have made efforts in keeping costs down in my 2.0 set up. ( Sold most of my gear in cross country move)
Mine currently is the v60 ($15) with a goose neck electric kettle ($45).
Biggest expense comes from buying high end, local ( bay area) beans. I save by having them grind at shop vs buying a high end grinder which can really rack up the price of the whole rig.
I also pull out my Aeropress ($35) on the weekends and think this makes a high quality cup as well.
I have found that cutting back on coffee has allowed me to enjoy higher quality stuff since I am not going through as much.
What is your set up look like and have you found a happy medium between price and quality?

snacky

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2015, 07:44:36 AM »
at work I have a small French press. (~$10)
at home I have a moka pot. (~$20) Also a Vietnamese coffee maker ($2) and an aeropress, ($25) but those are not in regular use.
I have a hand grinder ($40) that I bring on trips/ camping (hario makes a nice one) and an electric burr grinder (~$30) for daily use. fresh beans make a huge difference, so I don't buy pre-ground.
and locally roasted, high end beans, yes. ones that are glossy with delicious oils.

cheaping out on coffee strongly impacts my quality of life - even when everything is terrible, a really fantastic cup of coffee makes a little island of goodness in the sea of shit. I have reduced intake or gotten less excellent beans when in a financial emergency, but only temporarily.

also, my coffee is better and drastically cheaper than starbucks or similar. so I can justify the expense.

Cromacster

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2015, 08:04:06 AM »
Chemex (30$). 
Baratza Encore grinder (150$)
Hario v60 Kettle (50$)
good quality kitchen scale (50$?)

The only real fancy piece of equipment I have is the grinder, although I suppose the kettle is fancy compared to what is in the average household.  At home I only use the chemex.  No real reason other than not feeling the need to buy other pieces of equipment.  The one piece I would add would probably be a mocha pot.

Most of my coffee is free samples from my coffee connoisseur friend who works at a coffee import company or I buy it from another friend who runs a roasting company out of his garage...who buys his beans from the importer friend.
« Last Edit: December 03, 2015, 08:14:04 AM by Cromacster »

StetsTerhune

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2015, 08:15:41 AM »
I read an article a couple years ago about coffee set ups. The punchline at the beginning was something to the effect of "The day I learned the limits of market capitalism was the day I realized I could no longer coax anything drinkable from my auto-drip coffee machine."

Coffee is a perfect microcosm of hedonic adaptation. Do I actually enjoy my cup of (terrific) coffee that I'm drinking now more than I enjoyed my morning cup of (bad) coffee 5 years ago. Maybe slightly more, maybe not. But now I can't drink bad coffee at all. What was the point of any of this?

To answer your question, I do aeropress on weekdays and french press on weekends. I've come to the conclusion that it's considerably better to grind immediately before brewing than at the store, even if they have a more consistent grind than I can do (cheaply) at home. Obviously a kitchen scale is hugely important to consistency. I'm getting a conical grinder for christmas this year from my mother, who's really pleased I actually could think of something for her to get me this year.

FLBiker

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2015, 08:19:30 AM »
I've got a hario ceramic funnel (~$10) and that's about it.  I think my wife is getting me a grinder for Xmas, though, and I'm looking forward to that.  My first cup out of a store ground bag tastes better than my last, so I'm hoping to capture some of that.

And I've gone through phases of getting fancier coffee (I like Grounds for Change) but recently I've been getting the dark roast at Aldi.

Oh, and since Thanksgiving I use eggnog as my creamer.  I look forward to that every year. :)

Rubic

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2015, 11:11:23 AM »
Hario Coffee Mill Grinder:

http://www.amazon.com/Hario-Coffee-Mill-Slim-Grinder/dp/B001804CLY

Advantages:
  • Cost: $22
  • Manual Operation:  Works even when your electrical power is out.
  • Portable: Take it with you on your next trip along with your favorite coffee beans.

Manguy888

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2015, 11:28:24 AM »
I use a V60 with paper filters and a conical burr grinder.

We got an insanely expensive and complicated 'grind n brew' setup for our wedding where the coffee grinds right into the gold tipped filter when timer comes off. And the coffee was great! But what I found over time - and this is a general life lesson - is that complexity can give you a superior experience in the short run, but over time it's more trouble than it's worth. Cleaning the thing was impossible, there were all these little nooks and crannies. And if you didn't use it for a while, you'd always find some mold somewhere. The inside of the caraf would get all gunked up with coffee residue that I couldn't easily scrub off.

When the V60 is dripping into a mug, there's no part of it I can't see or easily wash.

neo von retorch

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2015, 11:51:14 AM »
How do you know if you're a coffee snob?

When you list products with obscure model names but no manufacturer.

Who or what is a V60? Is it made by Volvo? How does it fit into making coffee? Do you use it to drive to the store to purchase your beans?

Thanks :)

SeattleStache

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2015, 01:05:29 PM »
I use a Melita ceramic pour over (~$20), goose neck stove top kettle (~$35), ceramic manual burr coffee grinder (~$25), and fancy-pants local (Seattle) coffee (~$14/month). I only drink 10 oz a day but they better be a delicious 10 oz. All of my coffee gear is at least 4 years old and I use it every day. Well worth the initial expense for years of daily use. And I'm never tempted to purchase coffee out because I've got the good stuff at home.

madgeylou

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2015, 01:16:00 PM »
aeropress, costa rican beans, a cheapy grinder. we've been living on the road for a while so all of this is easy to transport. add some heavy cream and i'm a happy gal.

2ndTimer

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2015, 01:43:13 PM »
French Press
Costco Beans
Steamed milk made using an otherwise broken expresso maker.

tonysemail

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #11 on: December 03, 2015, 01:56:51 PM »
How do you know if you're a coffee snob?

When you list products with obscure model names but no manufacturer.


+1, I also enjoy coffee and yet I do not know what those things are either =)


spokey doke

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #12 on: December 03, 2015, 03:18:14 PM »
How do you know if you're a coffee snob?

When you list products with obscure model names but no manufacturer.


+1, I also enjoy coffee and yet I do not know what those things are either =)

I've never been able to get good coffee from a Volvo V60

clarkfan1979

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #13 on: December 03, 2015, 03:32:02 PM »
You can grind the beans at Costco for free.

I love coffee, but not much of a coffee snob. Anything but Folgers. However, when visiting the in-laws I will drink the Folgers.

horsepoor

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #14 on: December 03, 2015, 03:58:55 PM »
How do you know if you're a coffee snob?

When you list products with obscure model names but no manufacturer.


+1, I also enjoy coffee and yet I do not know what those things are either =)

I've never been able to get good coffee from a Volvo V60

Haha, I happened to know because I bought one when my old Melitta dripper finally cracked this spring.  Mine is stainless steel since I can't be trusted with glass or ceramic before I've had my coffee.  http://www.amazon.com/Hario-VDGN-02B-Glass-Coffee-Dripper/dp/B00JRY42H2/ref=sr_1_5?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1449183365&sr=1-5&keywords=hario+v60

My setup is the v60 and a Baratza Virtuoso grinder and an insulated stainless electric kettle.  For beans I use the Organic Rainforest ones that are about $18/3# currently at CostCo.
« Last Edit: December 04, 2015, 07:24:45 AM by horsepoor »

nora

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #15 on: December 03, 2015, 04:08:12 PM »
A delonghi automatic coffee machine which grinds and pours the coffee with the push of a button. Cost about $900 though! And we cheap out on beans, around $12 a kg. I think that means we aren't snobby about coffee, just lazy!

dragoncar

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #16 on: December 03, 2015, 04:58:28 PM »
When I get to work in the morning, I take the used coffee grounds out of the drip machine and suck on the filter.

jda1984

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #17 on: December 04, 2015, 06:53:11 AM »
That sounds like sucky coffee Dragoncar!

Axecleaver

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #18 on: December 04, 2015, 07:00:13 AM »
Quote
I save by having them grind at shop vs buying a high end grinder which can really rack up the price of the whole rig.

You will get the biggest return on your investment by buying a cheap grinder and grinding the beans just before you brew them. The ground beans lose flavor due to oxidation much more quickly than they do as roasted beans.

The next best thing you can do is roast beans yourself. I like dark roasts, like French Roast, with Sumatran beans. Get a nice, seasoned iron skillet and green coffee beans, roast them for about 10-12 minutes, stirring constantly.  You can also use a air-pop popcorn maker to roast beans, but I've never tried that.

Here's a good web page for ordering beans and supplies. High-end coffee is about $5 a pound when you roast yourself.
https://www.sweetmarias.com/


Manguy888

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #19 on: December 04, 2015, 07:27:38 AM »
Sorry - a V60 is this:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/3066115/?catalogId=92&sku=3066115&cm_ven=Google_PLA&cm_cat=Shopping&cm_pla=default&cm_ite=default&gclid=Cj0KEQiAkIWzBRDK1ayo-Yjt38wBEiQAi7NnP0neZkyLWXOJEyaq7z__PyqBeUdKU-8F9HyZwHRQP1UaAs2M8P8HAQ&kwid=productads-plaid^82946565943-sku^3066115-adType^PLA-device^c-adid^45527542303

It's just a little ceramic cone that goes on top of your mug. You put a paper filter in, add coffee, hot water, and voila! A benefit over French press is that you don't get any bits of coffee grounds in your coffee, it's a completely clean cup. At no time have I had to hook it up to a Volvo to get a good cup of coffee, but YMMV

I don't even know what brand my grinder is. I just know it's a conical burr grinder, and it seems a little more precise than the old blade grinder I had, but who knows if it's any better.

Cromacster

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #20 on: December 04, 2015, 07:31:57 AM »
Sorry - a V60 is this:
http://www.williams-sonoma.com/products/3066115/?catalogId=92&sku=3066115&cm_ven=Google_PLA&cm_cat=Shopping&cm_pla=default&cm_ite=default&gclid=Cj0KEQiAkIWzBRDK1ayo-Yjt38wBEiQAi7NnP0neZkyLWXOJEyaq7z__PyqBeUdKU-8F9HyZwHRQP1UaAs2M8P8HAQ&kwid=productads-plaid^82946565943-sku^3066115-adType^PLA-device^c-adid^45527542303

It's just a little ceramic cone that goes on top of your mug. You put a paper filter in, add coffee, hot water, and voila! A benefit over French press is that you don't get any bits of coffee grounds in your coffee, it's a completely clean cup. At no time have I had to hook it up to a Volvo to get a good cup of coffee, but YMMV

But don't get it confused with the Hario V60 Buono Kettle...

FrugalSpendthrift

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #21 on: December 04, 2015, 07:40:17 AM »
My new love is a Jura Impressa E9.  Luckily for me, my father in law has learned how to repair these machines, so he has made a habit of buying broken ones, repairing them and gifting them to family.

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #22 on: December 04, 2015, 07:40:34 AM »
I have an AeroPress that I've loved for quite some time. My wife only occasionally drinks coffee and I only have 1-2 cups a day, so it's very convenient. The fact that it brews excellent coffee is an added bonus.

Just purchased a Kaffeologie S metal filter for it. Jury's still out but I like it so far.

We also drink lots of tea and splurged on a Cuisinart adjustable temp electric kettle. Heats water very fast and eliminate all of the fuss of trying to reach specific non-boiling temperatures in either the microwave or on the stove.

Eventually I want to get a manual burr grinder like the Hario so my electric grinder can be used purely for spices without needing to clean it thoroughly of coffee residue.

I buy the Kirkland House coffee beans. $5/lb, fair trade certified, and while not as tasty as local roasters it's more than tasty enough to save nearly 66% per lb.

MayDay

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #23 on: December 04, 2015, 07:54:47 AM »
Goose neck kettle?  Now you need a special kettle?  I don't understand. 

We aren't coffee drinkers.  All our family is, so we keep ground coffee in the freezer for when they visit.  Does ground coffee degrade in the freezer or is it ok there for a while (by which I mean like a year).  Not that it will change my behavior, I consider my family lucky that we keep a cheapo 20$ coffee maker around for them and buy something better than Folgers :)


neo von retorch

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #24 on: December 04, 2015, 07:56:45 AM »
OK all cleared up, a V60, if you specify it to be a Hario... might be a glass or ceramic "dripper", or a kettle.. clear as black coffee! :)

My usual routine involves a Cuisinart Burr Grinder, cheap electric kettle and an AeroPress. I grind roughly however much coffee I need to make two full plunges (16 ounces) which I keep warm in a Zojirushi 16 oz thermos. It's blue.

Thegoblinchief

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #25 on: December 04, 2015, 08:13:16 AM »
We aren't coffee drinkers.  All our family is, so we keep ground coffee in the freezer for when they visit.  Does ground coffee degrade in the freezer or is it ok there for a while (by which I mean like a year).  Not that it will change my behavior, I consider my family lucky that we keep a cheapo 20$ coffee maker around for them and buy something better than Folgers :)

Yeah, it's fine. If they're fine making coffee in a cheap drip machine, they're not going to be fussy enough to notice the taste difference.

horsepoor

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #26 on: December 04, 2015, 09:17:55 AM »
Eventually I want to get a manual burr grinder like the Hario so my electric grinder can be used purely for spices without needing to clean it thoroughly of coffee residue.

Have you tried a mortar and pestle for your spices?  More fun and you get better control over the end product and don't need to grind a minimum amount and can be washed out with water.  With a bigger one, you can do guac and hummus and stuff in it too.  I bought a big granite one this spring and love it for mixing spices together with salt for say, seasoning a chicken before roasting.

Jeddy

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #27 on: December 04, 2015, 09:22:05 AM »
I love coffee but I'm definitely not a 'snob' - I use an Aeropress every morning. To heat the water, I use the blue tea kettle on the stove - that's the extent of my knowledge about it :)

yyc-phil

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #28 on: December 04, 2015, 09:25:06 AM »
I am a cheapo for most things but there are a few things like coffee on which I don't compromise. My setup is quite simple and cost-effective: a Gaggia Classic bought over 15 years ago for $250, and a good Gaggia conical burr grinder. The Classic is a solid, no-frills but good-looking stainless steel machine built like Volvos used to be in the 60s and 70s. It will deliver a consistent shot of espresso day after day, for years. A used one can be had for a couple of hundred dollars, and will last a lifetime. Investing in a good burr grinder is even more important than buying expensive beans. Again, no-frills solid burr grinders like a Gaggia can be bought for a few hundred dollars and that purchase is well worth the one-time expense. My average for basic supply costs (coffee beans and milk) is about 0.18 cents for a shot of espresso, and about 0.30 cents for a great cappuccino, which is still very cheap even if I buy fresh beans.

dragoncar

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #29 on: December 04, 2015, 11:52:45 AM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over

horsepoor

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #30 on: December 04, 2015, 12:05:53 PM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over

I think the main difference is being able to "bloom" the grounds by just saturating them and letting them soak a bit before pouring through.  Temperature is also another factor - obviously some machines can produce the correct temp, but many are not hot enough, IME.  Third, especially with the fancier kettle, you can continually wash the grounds down towards the bottom of the filter so the water is moving though more grounds on average.  Theoretically that could mean using less grounds per pour?

I like it because I can make any amount I choose.  I had a cheap Melitta plastic cone for about 15 years, so I wouldn't call it a "fancy ass" brewing method, but when it broke I got the stainless V60 and was surprised that the coffee tasted *very slightly* better.  Not sure if that's due to the material or the design, but there you go.

yyc-phil

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #31 on: December 04, 2015, 12:10:49 PM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over

All things equal (water, beans, grind) there are no difference whatsoever in the taste of coffee with a good quality auto-brewer. However, consistency and efficiency of a good drip machine are strong points in its favour. I personally never drink coffee brewed either way.

dragoncar

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #32 on: December 04, 2015, 01:42:02 PM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over

I think the main difference is being able to "bloom" the grounds by just saturating them and letting them soak a bit before pouring through.  Temperature is also another factor - obviously some machines can produce the correct temp, but many are not hot enough, IME.  Third, especially with the fancier kettle, you can continually wash the grounds down towards the bottom of the filter so the water is moving though more grounds on average.  Theoretically that could mean using less grounds per pour?

I like it because I can make any amount I choose.  I had a cheap Melitta plastic cone for about 15 years, so I wouldn't call it a "fancy ass" brewing method, but when it broke I got the stainless V60 and was surprised that the coffee tasted *very slightly* better.  Not sure if that's due to the material or the design, but there you go.

I only call it "fancy ass" because it's typically performed at more expensive/fancy coffee shops (or more expensive at a regular shop).

Maybe that's just because it's labor intensive.  btw, Starbucks has automated this process:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT1vH6Njaqk

I do understand there are minor differences... I'm just not sure most people would taste the difference between 1 oz "bloomed coffee" poured over 30 seconds vs. 1.2 oz "unbloomed" coffee dripped over 60 seconds (or whatever... I just made up all those numbers)

Inkedup

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #33 on: December 04, 2015, 01:59:09 PM »

Hario grinder + french press. The coffee always tastes great.

I also use the french press to brew loose leaf tea, which I drink on weekends. Sometimes I need a small break from coffee.   

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #34 on: December 04, 2015, 03:36:04 PM »
Hario burr grinder
Since we drink obscene amounts, we just do a Mr. Coffee auto drip
If we're trying to cut back (LOL) we do a cone pour over (cheap Mellita plastic guy)
No fancy kettle or scale yet, but those are both on the Amazon wishlist, so it's a matter of time before family can't come up with other gifts for us ;)

It's the coffee that's important to us. Portland Roasting Guatamalan. Best. Ever. <3 We go through 5lbs every 6 weeks (told you we have a problem) and buy it straight from the warehouse with a 10% loyalty code, so it works out to $1.15 per pot of coffee.

horsepoor

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #35 on: December 04, 2015, 03:48:38 PM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over

I think the main difference is being able to "bloom" the grounds by just saturating them and letting them soak a bit before pouring through.  Temperature is also another factor - obviously some machines can produce the correct temp, but many are not hot enough, IME.  Third, especially with the fancier kettle, you can continually wash the grounds down towards the bottom of the filter so the water is moving though more grounds on average.  Theoretically that could mean using less grounds per pour?

I like it because I can make any amount I choose.  I had a cheap Melitta plastic cone for about 15 years, so I wouldn't call it a "fancy ass" brewing method, but when it broke I got the stainless V60 and was surprised that the coffee tasted *very slightly* better.  Not sure if that's due to the material or the design, but there you go.

I only call it "fancy ass" because it's typically performed at more expensive/fancy coffee shops (or more expensive at a regular shop).

Maybe that's just because it's labor intensive.  btw, Starbucks has automated this process:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT1vH6Njaqk

I do understand there are minor differences... I'm just not sure most people would taste the difference between 1 oz "bloomed coffee" poured over 30 seconds vs. 1.2 oz "unbloomed" coffee dripped over 60 seconds (or whatever... I just made up all those numbers)

It makes me laugh because I worked at a coffee shop almost 20 years ago and we did exclusively pour-over coffee (price was the same as regular Joe at Starbuck's then).  People from out of town would come in and roll their eyes at our primitive methods and not have the patience to wait 60 seconds for their brew.  Now it is all the rage and costs extra.  It was actually pretty smart because we could offer a wider variety of brewed coffee and we weren't throwing out old, stale pots of coffee.

dragoncar

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #36 on: December 04, 2015, 04:36:23 PM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over

I think the main difference is being able to "bloom" the grounds by just saturating them and letting them soak a bit before pouring through.  Temperature is also another factor - obviously some machines can produce the correct temp, but many are not hot enough, IME.  Third, especially with the fancier kettle, you can continually wash the grounds down towards the bottom of the filter so the water is moving though more grounds on average.  Theoretically that could mean using less grounds per pour?

I like it because I can make any amount I choose.  I had a cheap Melitta plastic cone for about 15 years, so I wouldn't call it a "fancy ass" brewing method, but when it broke I got the stainless V60 and was surprised that the coffee tasted *very slightly* better.  Not sure if that's due to the material or the design, but there you go.

I only call it "fancy ass" because it's typically performed at more expensive/fancy coffee shops (or more expensive at a regular shop).

Maybe that's just because it's labor intensive.  btw, Starbucks has automated this process:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT1vH6Njaqk

I do understand there are minor differences... I'm just not sure most people would taste the difference between 1 oz "bloomed coffee" poured over 30 seconds vs. 1.2 oz "unbloomed" coffee dripped over 60 seconds (or whatever... I just made up all those numbers)

It makes me laugh because I worked at a coffee shop almost 20 years ago and we did exclusively pour-over coffee (price was the same as regular Joe at Starbuck's then).  People from out of town would come in and roll their eyes at our primitive methods and not have the patience to wait 60 seconds for their brew.  Now it is all the rage and costs extra.  It was actually pretty smart because we could offer a wider variety of brewed coffee and we weren't throwing out old, stale pots of coffee.

I've ordered decaf before and gotten a "free" pour over upgrade because they don't keep a pot of decaf sitting around all day.

A lot of places have started offering cold brew recently and it pisses me off that this is more expensive than regular coffee.  Cold brew is really simple to make, but maybe I'm missing something.

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #37 on: December 04, 2015, 04:41:07 PM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over

I think the main difference is being able to "bloom" the grounds by just saturating them and letting them soak a bit before pouring through.  Temperature is also another factor - obviously some machines can produce the correct temp, but many are not hot enough, IME.  Third, especially with the fancier kettle, you can continually wash the grounds down towards the bottom of the filter so the water is moving though more grounds on average.  Theoretically that could mean using less grounds per pour?

I like it because I can make any amount I choose.  I had a cheap Melitta plastic cone for about 15 years, so I wouldn't call it a "fancy ass" brewing method, but when it broke I got the stainless V60 and was surprised that the coffee tasted *very slightly* better.  Not sure if that's due to the material or the design, but there you go.

I only call it "fancy ass" because it's typically performed at more expensive/fancy coffee shops (or more expensive at a regular shop).

Maybe that's just because it's labor intensive.  btw, Starbucks has automated this process:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JT1vH6Njaqk

I do understand there are minor differences... I'm just not sure most people would taste the difference between 1 oz "bloomed coffee" poured over 30 seconds vs. 1.2 oz "unbloomed" coffee dripped over 60 seconds (or whatever... I just made up all those numbers)

It makes me laugh because I worked at a coffee shop almost 20 years ago and we did exclusively pour-over coffee (price was the same as regular Joe at Starbuck's then).  People from out of town would come in and roll their eyes at our primitive methods and not have the patience to wait 60 seconds for their brew.  Now it is all the rage and costs extra.  It was actually pretty smart because we could offer a wider variety of brewed coffee and we weren't throwing out old, stale pots of coffee.

I've ordered decaf before and gotten a "free" pour over upgrade because they don't keep a pot of decaf sitting around all day.

A lot of places have started offering cold brew recently and it pisses me off that this is more expensive than regular coffee.  Cold brew is really simple to make, but maybe I'm missing something.

A good cold brew takes a TON of grounds. It's not just cold coffee =)

wealthviahealth

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #38 on: December 04, 2015, 10:08:13 PM »
Serious question: isn't fancy-ass pour-over coffee effectively the same a drip?  Both pour hot water over grounds in a filter.  Maybe you have more control over temperature (although I do believe a machine can be made to any temperature spec).  I'd be very interested to see someone do a blind abx test with the same coffee grounds put into a drip machine and pour over
Good question and it some ways you are right. Consistency is a major difference as it total time brew time/ water distribution on bean. I also like this set up as it is 100% plastic free which is of importance to me for health reasons.
*Also of importance- the manual pour over also serves as a meditative ritual which I greatly enjoy in the morning.
I do think that you are right about many getting stumped in a tase test but I think this is true across the board in all "craft" consumables.

ozbeach

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #39 on: December 04, 2015, 10:30:23 PM »
I'm not a coffee snob, but when I have visitors or want a nice brew I have a Bialetti stove top espresso maker that has been going strong for about 30 years.

Kouhri

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #40 on: December 04, 2015, 11:14:19 PM »
I imagined something drastically different when clicking on this thread... more along the lines of:

Coffee snob unable to differentiate between super duper fancy pants coffee and cheapo but equally nice budget coffee  when secretly switched!

I'm somewhat sad that this is not the case as it means my fancy pants coffee habit (established when able to service addiction at no cost to me thanks to fancy pants private school) will have to remain a fond memory until FI. *dramatic tear*

Sailor Sam

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #41 on: December 04, 2015, 11:47:30 PM »
My coffee snob set up is to walk my butt downstairs, and visit the Starbucks. Yes, I live on top of a Starbucks. Yes, I find Starbucks dark roasts delicious. Yes, this has made me a weak willed Starbucks addict. Yay Seattle!

I justify it by whining about being deployed, and how fucking awful coffee was on the ship. Despite ordering grounds from (wait for it) Starbucks(!), the coffee as abominable. Some unholy trinity of potable water chemicals, a Hobart machine that was literally never cleaned, and pre-ground beans, and deep disdain that saturated the entire galley, and messes. The Chief Steward was not a good guy.
« Last Edit: December 05, 2015, 10:57:07 AM by Sailor Sam »

Sloeginfizz

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #42 on: December 05, 2015, 12:40:15 AM »
The gooseneck spout is so the water comes out of the kettle more slowly, more like the speed would come out of a coffee maker, rather than the fast flow that would normally come out of a regular kettle. Can you pour slowly out of a regular kettle? Yes. But I needed a new kettle anyway and the Noda Haro goose neck kettle I bought wasn't any more expensive than a similar regular kettle.

My set up is the Noda Haro kettle previously mentioned, a melitta plastic filter thingee I bought for $5 22 years ago, and the trader joes dark roast you can buy for $5.99 a can, ground at the store because I can't be arsed to grind every morning. Because so tired at 6am. It would probably be marginally better if I ground every morning but not enough better to make me do it.

Regarding cold brew. This is my choice for iced coffee season. Yes, it takes a ton of beans, but it also makes a very concentrated coffee,so you use less. The can of coffee I buy at trader joes lasts me 2 weeks whether it's cold brew or hot brew season.

stripey

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #43 on: December 05, 2015, 01:35:19 AM »
I don't know. Am I snobby?* Around my circle of friends, 'snobby' usually means one has a proper espresso machine at home- I don't.

I have somewhere between 0 and 2 cups of coffee daily. If I make it at home, I typically use a Bialetti Brikka (2-cup, where the 'cups' 60ml shots) which is a modified moka pot with a weighted valve that allows a bit of pressure to be generated- it's definietly not a true espresso, but with the correct grind and decent beans it will generate a crema of sorts. It's more caffeinated than usual due to the slightly longer brewing time. I also have a Porlex hand-grinder and I love it (except for the handle, that's a different story). It's all stainless steel and ceramic burrs, which can be completely dismantled to clean it so there's no chance of stale-old-coffee-oil-smell.

I've played around with the Aeropress but as I love strong black coffee the Brikka wins out. Also, the Aeropress looks like some sort of scary medical device!

Also, cold-brew iced coffee scented with cardamom pods in summer is lovely (reminds me of the slightly flavoured coffee of the Levant)



*Bloody Aussies again and their snobbishness.

MMMaybe

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #44 on: December 05, 2015, 02:59:18 AM »
I have a few different options. Its hard to get decent freshly ground coffee here. Its just a bit hard to get the correct grind and kind of gets lost in translation. My grinder died and I am waiting to buy a decent one when we leave here.

So I have a Hario ceramic cone for pour over coffee. A metal Vietnamese style coffee pour over cup, which I take travelling. Then I have 2 stovetop moka pots, which get the most use.

I can't start my morning without a strong coffee and this works for me, depending on what mood I am in.

Altons Bobs

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #45 on: December 05, 2015, 08:38:48 PM »
I roast my own coffee, have been for at least the last 15 years.  I bought green coffee from sweet marias and also directly from Kona farmers before as well as other places.  I don't drink coffee much these days, just when I feel like it, then I'll roast some with one of my coffee roasters.  I do have a manual espresso machine (Saeco) that I have to use a tamper to tamp my ground. Have to use RO water, a digital scale, and coffee has to be freshly roasted. Also have a few burr grinders (Starbucks, Gaggia, Baratza). I also have a Chemex and also a cheapo pour over from World Market ($6), and a french press. Oh yeah, and a couple of glass vacuum brewers.  And I make my own organic caramel sauce and organic vanilla basic syrup to go with my espresso drinks too. I'm also getting a Hario gooseneck kettle for Christmas. I don't think I'm a coffee snob. Oh oh, and a cold brew bag like a nut milk bag.

jengod

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #46 on: December 05, 2015, 08:54:15 PM »
Just started roasting Costco green beans at home using a Whirley-Pop/cast-iron combination.

Grind in a Cuisinart blade grinder. I'll get a burr grinder when the Cuisinart breaks.

Bodum French press.

Wesmon

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #47 on: December 05, 2015, 09:09:28 PM »
I use a Keurig to make hot water and Nescafe Classic Dark instant.

I use KCups for guests.

I tried reusable KCups but they didn't work very well.

Telecaster

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Re: Coffee Snob Set Up
« Reply #48 on: December 05, 2015, 10:46:12 PM »
I used a burr grinder and the Bialetti.  Excellent, consistent espresso.