Author Topic: Coconut milk exp. July 2018  (Read 1160 times)

cbee6390

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 25
Coconut milk exp. July 2018
« on: October 08, 2017, 09:38:53 AM »
Not sure if this is the right forum... I'm of course trying to save money on food/groceries so have been buying in bulk. Unfortunately summer 2015 I left my box of 6 cans of Thai Kitchen coconut milk out in my car for about 24 hours, in heat that went up to about 80/85 degrees. I forgot about it and am just getting back to using it. (Expires July 2018.) I opened a can and it looks basically fine other than a slight gray tint to it. Tastes fine but maybe not quite as 'coconut-y' as usual...

Safe to use? seems such a shame to waste.

yachi

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 243
Re: Coconut milk exp. July 2018
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2017, 05:05:40 PM »
I would think it's fine.  If it's not refrigerated at the grocery store, it probably didn't get there in a refrigerated truck.

lhamo

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 9625
  • Location: Seattle
Re: Coconut milk exp. July 2018
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2017, 08:52:08 PM »
USDA recommends keeping canned goods under 85F. Short term exposure up to 100 F is probably ok, though:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/wps/portal/fsis/topics/food-safety-education/get-answers/food-safety-fact-sheets/safe-food-handling/shelf-stable-food-safety/ct_index

"Will commercially canned foods last forever?

Commercial canning is done under tightly controlled conditions careful sanitation and the necessary time and temperature under pressure, but there are still limits to how long it will preserve food. There are several factors that limit the shelf life of canned foods. First, cans can rust over time. Shipping accidents, where cans fall and dent or are crushed, also cause container problems.

Then there's can corrosion. In all foods, but especially in high-acid foods like canned tomatoes, natural chemicals in the food continually react with the container. Over several years, this can cause taste and texture changes, and eventually lower the nutritional value of the food.

High temperatures (over 100 F) are harmful to canned goods too. The risk of spoilage jumps sharply as storage temperatures rise. In fact, canned goods designed for use in the tropics are specially manufactured.

Store canned foods and other shelf stable products in a cool, dry place. Never put them above or beside the stove, under the sink, in a damp garage or basement, or any place exposed to high or low temperature extremes. Temperatures below 85 F are best. Check your pantry every few weeks and use canned goods you have had on hand for awhile. Don't purchase bulging, rusted, leaking, or deeply dented cans."


cbee6390

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 25
Re: Coconut milk exp. July 2018
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2017, 05:56:42 AM »
Thank you so much!