Author Topic: Changing salary - what would you do?  (Read 2850 times)

AZDude

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Changing salary - what would you do?
« on: November 10, 2015, 01:39:27 PM »
So, a strange situation just happened. Thought I would share and ask for some advice.

I took a new job back in early summer. It is substantially more money, but I hate it. I realized a couple months ago that no amount of money was worth coming here every day. I start looking around at other jobs, and eventually I go through a recruiter to get an offer that is more than my previous job, but less than my current one. I say yes, and the recruiter quotes me a definitive salary. Fast forward a few days. HR at my soon-to-be employer calls me, "offering" me the job, but with a quoted salary that is less than what the recruiter said. This seems very strange. I call the recruiter, and they have no idea what is going on and are "looking into it". The new quoted salary is actually a little bit less than what I made at my previous employer.

Given that I hate my current job, and the offered one sounds much more interesting and is much closer to home, what would you do assuming the new quote ends up being the actual number? I have already turned in notice at my current employer. In another twist, another company called me, went through a phone screen with the hiring manager, and wants to bring me in for an interview.
With the uncertainty, I agreed knowing I can always cancel later. This job would have a longer commute, but with WFH option twice a week. Salary would about the same as I am making now. Phone conversation with the hiring manager went pretty well, and assuming I don't say anything really stupid, I give myself a good chance of landing the job.

I really hate recruiters and normally refuse to work with them because they often try to scam you and will lie right to your face. However, this particular one seemed reputable and so far the process has been smooth. Assuming they come back with the lower salary, what would you do?

1) Negotiate but eventually take the offer, cancel the other interview.
2) Refuse the offer, go to the other interview and rock their world, take that job.
3) Say yes, but go to the interview anyway and see how it goes.

Thankfully, there is good news. My budget is solid and even with a lower salary I will still be able to add a good amount to the 'stache each month. Also not too worried about the slim possibility of being unemployed through the holiday season, since my wife is still working and we have plenty of savings.



lhamo

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #1 on: November 10, 2015, 05:02:23 PM »
What about option #4:

See what the real offer is from the place where you currently have something lined up, and then tell them you need some time to consider it.  In the meantime, interview with place #2.  If you think you are going to get an offer from place #2, then you can use that detail in your negotiations with place #1.  Hopefully place #2 will make you an offer as well, and then you can decide based on relative merits of each place.

I would not rush to accept an offer from place #1 at a salary lower than what you were earning in your previous job.  I made the mistake of taking a 20% pay cut once.  Yes, I got some improvement in quality of life, but I took a real hit financially.  It sounds like you have lots of options.  I would aim for something at least as good as your most recent position.


use2betrix

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #2 on: November 10, 2015, 07:14:49 PM »
It's probably the recruiting agency just skimming extra $$ off the bet. Likely the salary didn't change, but they think they can sneak own by you so they get a bigger chunk. All I do is contract work and have worked with recruiters. Some of them are so shady. I've had what happened to you, happen to me, and I called their bluff. Told them if that was the case I was going to go to some other interviews and will let them know but I was very disappointed. They called back 10 minutes later with the original amount. Blamed it on the "new employer."

Edit, reading back, your situation is slightly different, but similar still applies. I'd tell them, my recruiter told me "x" amount. "X" amount is already less than I currently make, and this new number is even less. That is very discouraging and not a very good sign on their end. Then, if you have a pair and don't mind a risk, ask them if they can match what you were promised, but if not you are going to go to some other interviews you have scheduled before you decide. Then tell them to find out what they can about matching the salary you were promised and go from there.

That's how I'd play it, personally. You don't mess with someone's money and what they did is very unprofessional.


mozar

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #3 on: November 10, 2015, 07:19:52 PM »
Or, say yes to the offer (after getting a firm price), take the interview, say yes to that offer too, and then decide. Nothing is guaranteed. If you can, use the first offer to get a higher second offer.

Zamboni

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #4 on: November 10, 2015, 07:40:56 PM »
Absolutely do NOT take the new lower amount. Say that you agreed to the previously quoted salary, but you are now having second thoughts based upon this new development. No reason they give will cut the mustard. For example, if they say "we can't pay you this much because it wouldn't be fair to this other employee" respond with "it's not my fault that you underpay other people." You get the idea. I had an employer do this to me once. They quoted me $60K and then came back with $40K and some lame ass reasons for it. I said "no go" unless it was the original amount; offer went back up to original amount. This is really shitty treatment and you don't start to start a new position unless they shape up immediately.

Let them know that in the meantime other leads have led to interviews at other places (because apparently your skill set is in high demand) and so you can't give them a decision right away. Thank them for their offer, and say you will think on it for x time (whatever time you need.) Trust me, their offer will probably not evaporate. I stalled a prospective employer for 6 months once, and you can do it for a couple of weeks if you have to.

If you take the lower amount, then not only have your screwed yourself today, but you have probably set a precedent at the new company that they can continue to treat you badly in the future in terms of compensation.

Good luck!

Wilson Hall

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #5 on: November 10, 2015, 07:54:29 PM »
What about option #4:

See what the real offer is from the place where you currently have something lined up, and then tell them you need some time to consider it.  In the meantime, interview with place #2.  If you think you are going to get an offer from place #2, then you can use that detail in your negotiations with place #1.  Hopefully place #2 will make you an offer as well, and then you can decide based on relative merits of each place.

I would not rush to accept an offer from place #1 at a salary lower than what you were earning in your previous job.  I made the mistake of taking a 20% pay cut once.  Yes, I got some improvement in quality of life, but I took a real hit financially.  It sounds like you have lots of options.  I would aim for something at least as good as your most recent position.

I like this option.

AZDude, I'm sorry to hear that your new job is such a disappointment. In the past, I've taken a couple of positions that appeared to have dream-job potential, only to be let down. I've been invited to apply for a promotion at my current workplace and am reluctant to do so, partially out of fear that I won't like it and will have to move on elsewhere. The benefits, proximity to my home, and workplace environment are good enough that I think I'd rather stay put at my current salary and hang on until FIRE by my mid-50s (hopefully).

Keep us updated!

AZDude

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2015, 08:59:44 AM »
It's probably the recruiting agency just skimming extra $$ off the bet. Likely the salary didn't change, but they think they can sneak own by you so they get a bigger chunk. All I do is contract work and have worked with recruiters. Some of them are so shady. I've had what happened to you, happen to me, and I called their bluff. Told them if that was the case I was going to go to some other interviews and will let them know but I was very disappointed. They called back 10 minutes later with the original amount. Blamed it on the "new employer."

Wow... I did almost the same thing as you. After not hearing back from the recruiter, I called them again and told them point blank I have other interviews lined up and I need to know what is going on *now*. Miraculously, within an hour, the big wig down at recruiting headquarters contacted me, blamed working with a new employer, and personally guaranteed the original amount quoted to me.

Anyway, I'm still going to the other interview because of all the shenanigans and just to see the place and the work they do, but I have a feeling that was the end of the drama. Thanks for all the replies.

catccc

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2015, 09:40:04 AM »
I would tell them you'll need to see the offer in writing, too, before formally accepting, but that everything sounds good so far.  Then go on the other interview.  When the written offer from job 1 comes in, depending on how you feel about the interview, either take it or tell them you need a few days.  Then, if you are really interested in job 2 from the latter interview, let them know that you are really interested, and hate to rush such big decisions, but you want to know what their timeline looks like because you have an offer on the table and need to get back to them by x date.

I've done this before.  I was one of two final candidates, and they brought me in for, like, a 4th live interview, trying to sell me a different job at the organization so they could take both candidates into the company.  I told them I had an offer from another well known organization (didn't say it was a contract position, though...) and that I really liked their place and wanted the original job, but the other organization needed to hear from me by next tuesday.  Got a formal offer within 24 hours, at the salary I asked for.  People don't like things to slip away from them, and they want what they can't (or potentially can't) have.

flan

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Re: Changing salary - what would you do?
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2015, 10:40:56 AM »
Definitely go through with the other interview - it never hurts to have more options. The first company is most likely not going to retract their offer just because you want a few weeks to decide with both options on the table. DO let the other interview organizer know that you have an offer that you are considering, so they know not to drag their feet lest they lose the opportunity to give you an offer.