Author Topic: Good financial/FIRE books for high school/college students?  (Read 1950 times)

Exhale

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Good financial/FIRE books for high school/college students?
« on: November 14, 2015, 12:53:06 PM »
I'm looking for good financial health/FIRE books for young adults.  I'd like to give this type of a book for high school/college graduation gifts.  Note: Younger folks have told me that books like YMOYL feel too "old" (their word, not mine). So, I'm on the hunt for something that they'd read. Thank you in advance for your suggestions!

lhamo

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Re: Good financial/FIRE books for high school/college students?
« Reply #1 on: November 14, 2015, 01:16:51 PM »
I haven't read it, but Farnoosh Torabi's first book -- You're So Money -- was oriented toward a young er demographic.  She's also got a podcast (So Money) that is pretty good for the basics.  She isn't as savvy about long-term financial planning as most of us here, though -- in one podcast she told someone that retirement accounts can never be tapped before traditional retirement age, which I found surprisingly ignorant given that she's been in the financial media space for many years now. 

Ramit Sethi's "I will teach you to be rich" might be good for a young beginner, too.  His advice on automation and using "scripts" to negotiated down payments is particularly useful.  He also has a blog that offers a lot of useful free information, but as has been discussed on other threads here his current stance is to focus mostly on income generation strategies rather than spending reduction.  So not totally in keeping with an MMM approach. 

Suze Orman also has a book with "Young Fabulous and Broke" in the title, but I'm guessing most young people would probably find her approach a bit "old" as well.

 

Moustachienne

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Re: Good financial/FIRE books for high school/college students?
« Reply #2 on: November 14, 2015, 06:53:48 PM »
The Blonde on a Budget blog is really good as a "younger" voice, and just good in general.  I notice that she recommends other blogs and podcasts but not books.  Could be a thing with the youngs to be less attracted to books on this subject.

http://blondeonabudget.ca/

Exhale

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Re: Good financial/FIRE books for high school/college students?
« Reply #3 on: November 14, 2015, 08:40:02 PM »
Suze Orman also has a book with "Young Fabulous and Broke" in the title, but I'm guessing most young people would probably find her approach a bit "old" as well.
Thank you lhamo, I checked out those books and then looked at Orman's book. I think Orman might work well. I've put it on hold at the library.

The Blonde on a Budget blog is really good as a "younger" voice, and just good in general. 
http://blondeonabudget.ca/


What a great site - thank you Moustachienne! She is launching a yearly planer that looks promising. See: https://gumroad.com/l/mindfulbudgetingplanner

moneyandmillennials

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    • Money and Millennials: An Illustrated Advice Book
Re: Good financial/FIRE books for high school/college students?
« Reply #4 on: November 15, 2015, 01:52:40 AM »
Hi Exhale,

I actually just wrote a book specifically for this age group called Money and Millennials: An Illustrated Advice Book. 

This book is geared towards young people's communication preferences, a combination of Twitter meets Instagram.  30 pieces of succinct advice combined with high quality, fun illustrations.  It's a quick read and has different categories of preparing, saving, investing, and earning.

And of course, the background is my home, Hawai'i!

It's a great gift for anyone graduating, their first job, saving for a house, etc.

I assure you the vibe is young but practical! Please see my signature for the Amazon link.

Cornbread OMalley

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Re: Good financial/FIRE books for high school/college students?
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2015, 10:21:52 PM »
I recommend the two that got me started:

a) The Boglehead's Guide to Investing by Larimore, Lindauer, and LeBeoeuf.

b) The Millionaire Next Door by Stanley and Danko.

Not exactly two books that are geared toward the younger crowd.  But they may strike a chord with some kids.