Author Topic: Career Dilemma  (Read 5543 times)

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3171
Career Dilemma
« on: May 14, 2013, 07:27:14 PM »
I interviewed for a job. I wrote the hiring manager about a week after the interview to say I was taking myself out of the running. She said I was a top candidate and asked me why. I said I felt like I had more I wanted to do at my current job, which was/is true.

Now, I am having second thoughts about taking myself out of the running for the job I interviewed for. I saw that the job got re-posted on LinkedIn, so I was tossing around the idea of writing the hiring manager to put my hat back in the ring (if she doesn't find that too indecisive of me).

Would it be too nuts to call or email the hiring manager to say I'd like to put my hat back in the ring if she's willing?
« Last Edit: September 07, 2013, 10:04:17 PM by oldtoyota »

FlorenceMcGillicutty

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #1 on: May 14, 2013, 07:51:51 PM »
Hmm. This one is tough. My disclaimer--I'm not a good mustachian but I'm pretty god at career advice. Some tough love-- you shouldn't take yourself out of the running for a job until you have an offer. Otherwise you don't know what you're comparing. You can usually negotiate salary, benefits, and office space. You can also find out more about office culture and reorganization when an offer is on the table.

That said, since you already sent the email, my suggestion would be to send an email to the hiring manager, say you saw the position was reposted, and ask to have coffee or lunch to chat. Then you could talk casually about your concerns and see if they can be addressed. If it sounds promising, reapply. If not, you made a connection and a friend.

This could also be an opportunity to talk to your current office about your concerns. Just talk to them about your interests and if they'd help you develop them. Ask about succession planning. It can't hurt!

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3171
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2013, 09:18:28 PM »
You are right. I do not know why I contacted her to withdraw my name. That was not a good idea. Urgh.

I like your idea to contact her and to invite her out. Thanks!

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3171
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #3 on: May 15, 2013, 09:08:52 AM »
All right. I did it. Even if she does not write back, I did what I could to fix my error.

FlorenceMcGillicutty

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #4 on: May 15, 2013, 09:10:45 AM »
Nice! Good luck. Also, I think this is great interview advice. You might want to take a look before you meet up.

http://www.ted.com/talks/amy_cuddy_your_body_language_shapes_who_you_are.html

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3171
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #5 on: May 15, 2013, 07:14:27 PM »
Thank you!

tooqk4u22

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2353
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #6 on: May 15, 2013, 07:25:38 PM »
Florence - i like your strategy.

Oldtoyota - notwithstanding above, if I was the hiring manager I would not reconsider you.

Also, most of the pros/cons you cite for both places are not really good criteria....none of them seem material enough to sway one way or the other unless it is on the margins.

Besides, you pulled yourself out of the running for a reason......you need to think about that.

Good luck.

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3171
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #7 on: May 17, 2013, 09:10:38 AM »
Oldtoyota - notwithstanding above, if I was the hiring manager I would not reconsider you.


That is funny. I would. Also, she did. The convo went really well and she complimented me for having the bravery to admit my mistake and contact her. =-)

gdborton

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 254
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Muncie, Indiana
    • Gary Borton
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #8 on: May 17, 2013, 09:17:29 AM »
Have you told your current employer that your looking for a new position?

I made it pretty clear for about three months that I'd like a different spot within my company, and kept getting a "we'll see if it gets better"  I started secretly looking for about a month, and when my manager asked if I was liking my position better I just flat out told him "I've been told this is bad career advice, but I gotta be honest, I'm looking for a new job."

He almost immediately started the ball rolling to get me where I wanted to be.  I should be moving internally in the next 2-3 weeks.

FlorenceMcGillicutty

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 116
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2013, 09:24:16 AM »
Have you told your current employer that your looking for a new position?

I made it pretty clear for about three months that I'd like a different spot within my company, and kept getting a "we'll see if it gets better"  I started secretly looking for about a month, and when my manager asked if I was liking my position better I just flat out told him "I've been told this is bad career advice, but I gotta be honest, I'm looking for a new job."

He almost immediately started the ball rolling to get me where I wanted to be.  I should be moving internally in the next 2-3 weeks.

First of all, congrats OldToyota! I'm glad it went well.

As far as this advice, I think it works in certain circumstances, but it's a lot more powerful when you actually have another offer on the table. Then you can say, I'm worth $xx,xxx more to this other company and they've offered me a promotion. I'd like to stick around here and I feel loyal to the company, blah blah blah. It's a better negotiating tool and it's also better should your plan backfire and you need/want to leave. What you did is a risky strategy because some managers will take offense. Every office culture is different and you generally know if you can pull it off or not, but it's certainly not applicable to every situation.

tooqk4u22

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2353
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #10 on: May 17, 2013, 10:09:35 AM »
Oldtoyota - notwithstanding above, if I was the hiring manager I would not reconsider you.


That is funny. I would. Also, she did. The convo went really well and she complimented me for having the bravery to admit my mistake and contact her. =-)

I am glad it worked out, and glad for you it wasn't me :)   

oldtoyota

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3171
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2013, 12:49:53 PM »
Have you told your current employer that your looking for a new position?

I made it pretty clear for about three months that I'd like a different spot within my company, and kept getting a "we'll see if it gets better"  I started secretly looking for about a month, and when my manager asked if I was liking my position better I just flat out told him "I've been told this is bad career advice, but I gotta be honest, I'm looking for a new job."

He almost immediately started the ball rolling to get me where I wanted to be.  I should be moving internally in the next 2-3 weeks.

Florence has a point. That is risky. I'm glad it worked for you though.

Personally, I would not be mad if an employee looked around. I had a contractor and said I hoped his job would become perm, but I could not promise that would happen. I invited him to look around if he could not take the uncertainty and even to use me as a reference. I know that the organization could lay off people at any time. Therefore, I expect employees to be looking for new jobs at any time.



« Last Edit: May 17, 2013, 12:52:12 PM by oldtoyota »

gdborton

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 254
  • Age: 31
  • Location: Muncie, Indiana
    • Gary Borton
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #12 on: May 17, 2013, 01:19:38 PM »
I think the most important thing in my situation was that I made it clear that I was unhappy, and gave the job an honest effort.  Also, I appear to have had a very positive impression on the managers.  Also my age may have had something to do with it.

CNM

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 527
Re: Career Dilemma
« Reply #13 on: May 17, 2013, 01:40:28 PM »
It sounds like you already have a lot of good advice.  A question I had was whether you had a serious discussion with your current supervisor about your expectations and goals for the job.  See what your manager counters with.  You should ask for a raise if you believe others at your level are earning more than you.