Author Topic: Car decisions, my situation.  (Read 8471 times)

cbr shadow

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Car decisions, my situation.
« on: October 28, 2013, 10:48:17 AM »
Iím having trouble deciding on a car to buy.  I just sold my 2001 Honda Insight because it doesnít totally suit my needs anymore.  I have a wife and (2) 70+ pound dogs, so having no back seat wasnít working.  My wife has a 2011 Kia Sorrento which works great for us, but the 2 seater wasnít too limiting for me.
Anyways, Iíll start with our ďstatsĒ and situation to give you a better idea of my needs and what I can afford.

Age: 29/30
Financial:
Combined income: $175k
-   No kids, none planned
-   No consumer debt or car payments
-   $194k mortgage (3.75%, 15-yr) (1250 sq. ft. ranch single-family home)
-   $175k net worth (relatively new to high paying jobs and stashing money away)
-   Both max our 401kís and Roth IRAís yearly
-   Low bills overall, everyone surprised at how low our gas/elec bills are
-   Both have pretty secure jobs.

Unmustachian Habits:
-   Both getting into Triathlon this year.  Expensive bikes ($2500 combined), race entry fees ($700 combined), and gym memberships ($60/month combined)
-   (2) medium/large dogs
-   Compared to all of our friends we eat out very little (1x per week) but this COULD be reduced.  We enjoy that time out of the house together for a date night though, so thatís unlikely to change.  Those evenings cost $60 generally, so $240/month.

Car requirements:
-   Looks professional.  One thing that I didnít like about my previous cars (2006 Scion XB, 2001 Insight) is that they donít look very professional.  I pull up to a customerís office and  get a lot of stares.  It feels unprofessional and I think people view these cars as young kids cars (generally).
-   Gas mileage.  Previous cars got outstanding gas mileage.  I donít need THAT high, but donít want a big SUV or V8 sedan
-   4 doors
-   Reliable, not high mileage
-   Fun Ė this isnít normally a requirement posted on this forum, but Iím going to put a bit more importance on this area for my new car.  The insight was the opposite of fun to drive, the XB was slightly more fun but not a lot.

The used cars Iím considering are:
2009+ Honda Fit - $12,000 roughly.  This is starting to look like itís out of the question based on the ďprofessionalĒ and ďfunĒ requirements above, but it is very functional, economical, and has 4 doors.
2007+ Honda Civic - $10k-12k roughly.  This might be the sweet spot?  Professional enough, not really ďfunĒ, fairly functional, 4 doors, economical.
2006+ Acura TL - $17-18k  This is by far the most fun and the car Iíd be most excited about.  Very professional and very fun, not as functional, not as economical, does have 4 doors.

By most peopleís (and my) definition of ďAffordĒ, I can afford any of these cars.  I'd pay in cash and stay away from car payments.  Iím leaning towards either the Civic or the Acura, just because the Fit seems a little juvenile and geeky.  No offense to the many people on the forum that currently own Fits Ė Iím sure theyíre great cars.

I guess the main question is; Is the Acura worth the extra money? I lust for this car.  It would be roughly $5k more.  I think my dilemma is that if I get the Civic Iím afraid Iíll wish I had the more exciting Acura TL.  Admittedly this has to do also with my outward image.  Iím also concerned that if I get the Acura Iíll later regret not being super-mustachian and getting the Civic.  My issue with the TL is that I almost feel like I'm putting my wife and I in a bad situation by buying it, even though I KNOW I'm not.  She agrees to getting either car.

Lastly, before you respond with ďSave money, get the Fit, and shut upĒ ;-) Iíd like to know:
1)   What you drive
2)   Do you see a car as only being transportation
3)   Do you splurge on anything if you can afford it? I noticed MMM spends extra money on his house (large house, lots of more-than-necessary design features, landscaping, etc) but puts very little priority on cars.  This is his personal choice because he values those things over cars..  Is it not reasonable to have different values than he does and spend money on other items?

Thanks for any input!

Argyle

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2013, 11:04:01 AM »
What kind of job do you do that involves customers seeing your car?  I would help to know before we can comment.

It seems like you really want the more expensive car.  The way I understand it, though, MMM doesn't "put money into" his house.  He works on it himself to optimize it so it's very low-cost to run.  He's calculated that over ten years, this new house will save him $181,000 over the old one.  And it's 1000 square feet smaller than the old one.  Looks pretty modestly sized in the picture.  So buying a large house is not a MMM practice that can be generalized to buying expensive cars.  The other difference, of course, is that by and large houses hold their value, while cars depreciate, and pretty fast, too.

That said, you don't specify how you want to buy this car, other than that you can technically afford it.  What does that mean?  Will you be paying cash?  Are you aiming for FI?  How much of your income are you saving?  At that rate, how long till FI?  And how much longer would the extra $5000 (and interest, if you're financing) set you back till FI?

The other thing mustachianism does is to facepunch us until we really separate our wants from our needs, and assess the real price of those wants.  So it helps to reevaluate everything we insist we want.  The thing we say we want most is probably the thing that should most be evaluated.  Especially it's a $5000 want instead of a $50 want.  So now you know what your top reevaluation priority would be.  Not to say you can't get the fancier car, but it's very clear how you could save $5000 easily -- or not.

As for my own car, which you ask about, it's a 1994 Toyota Tercel which I bought thirteen years ago for $1200, and which has 60,000 miles on it.  At this rate it will last me the rest of my life.  Imagine never paying for a car again in your life.  I do relish having all that extra money, which is sitting in investments making me more money.

cynthia1848

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2013, 11:34:49 AM »
I would get the Acura.  I have an 03 TL that I bought in 2002 and it is still going strong with 125K miles.

My husband recently had to get a car for work; it is important that clients see him in a decent-looking car.  (Kind of like having to dress well to go fund-raising.)  He ended up with an Infiniti G37.

dadof4

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2013, 11:38:41 AM »
There is a lot of focus on car prices, but that is mostly irrelevant (assuming you stay in a reasonable price range).
Depending on the make and model of the car, and how much you drive, the top expenses are:
1. Depreciation - the silent killer.
2. Gas consumption
3. Maintenance.

For newer cars, depreciation is high and maintenance is low. For older cars it is the other way around. Check those number for the cars you listed, or look at other options.

A $5000 difference in price in the models you are looking at, which can be financed at 2% APR, is only costing you $100 a year.

As to what I drive - After a couple decades driving older clunkers, for the first time in my life, I bought a new car last year. A 2013 Mazda 6. Paid $17k.
While I could have saved a little by going in a different direction (at most, it wouldn't be more than a $1000 a year savings) I have no regrets about that purchase.
I have a long commute, am stuck in that car for more time than I like to admit. Reliability and convenience are worth it for me. 

Before that, I had a much shorter commute or worked from home. I bought a 3 year old Ford Taurus for 7k, traded it in 6 years later for 3k (could probably have sold at 4k to a private seller). Put on 30k miles during that time. Very few repairs needed. So it was far more economical for that situation.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2013, 11:53:19 AM by dadof4 »

iamlindoro

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2013, 11:45:20 AM »
I would get the Acura.  I have an 03 TL that I bought in 2002 and it is still going strong with 125K miles.

What is the basis for the recommendation of a 50% more expensive option?  Is there any reason to believe that any of the other options could not survive 125K miles?  100K+ mileage is the bare minimum expectation for cars these days.

For my money any of these options is a perfectly presentable option so long as you maintain the car well.  Based on the wording of the question it "feels" like you're pre-challenging anyone who suggests you get anything but your favorite (and most expensive) option.  The Civic is a very presentable, standard sedan which looks quite presentable in a professional color like black or white.  It's also the least expensive option.  All three options are "practically new" and should have minimal maintenance costs.  At the age of all three, you are not looking at having to do major repairs any time in the near future, barring a freak accident or production issue.

To answer a couple of your questions, I do spend money on my hobbies-- I am a longtime triathlete with a couple of expensive bikes.  I spend several thousand each year on race entries and race travel.  It comes from my vacation fund/is done in lieu of other vacation travel.  Yes, there's some wiggle room in finding the balance between happiness and frugality-- but I think that the choice of car has an abrupt dropoff in satisfaction after a very brief period-- how long after you purchase *any* of these options does it become just a means of transportation?  I would argue that it's quite quick, and not worth an extra 6-8K in that case.

imbros

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2013, 12:06:32 PM »
None of those cars are really fun.

I think I would consider getting a Volvo V50 or V70 (not AWD models). Way more fun to drive and safer than all those cars and probably have only a slighlty higher maintenance cost than Acura. They are really inexpensive in the used market and they are very refined vehicles.

I currently don't have a car since I don't need it. Sold my boring but reliable Pontiac Vibe a few weeks ago. If I were to get a new one, I would go with a Volvo or Saab. 

daverobev

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2013, 03:35:19 PM »
Mazda 3? They are supposed to be pretty good fun, and hatchback > sedan, all day, every day.

Civic is not fun. Fit is probably not fun.

If you want to *look* a bit.. well, older/more boring *ahem* grown up, how about an Accord or Camry? Fuel efficiency isn't much worse than Civic/Corolla I think, depending on what engine of course.

Or! Just buy a Buick! Insurance is cheap (in Ontario that matters!), V6 well ok not the most fuel efficient, but they are cheap when a few years old! And you can get mint condition ones from old fogies! Yeah!

netskyblue

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2013, 03:40:08 PM »
Or! Just buy a Buick! Insurance is cheap (in Ontario that matters!), V6 well ok not the most fuel efficient, but they are cheap when a few years old! And you can get mint condition ones from old fogies! Yeah!

Ha, that's what my mom does.  Seriously, she has bought more than one Buick off an old person who didn't drive any more (and had put next to nothing in miles on the car), and I think one from the estate of an old person who had just died.

Eric

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2013, 03:40:38 PM »
Car requirements:
-   Looks professional.  One thing that I didnít like about my previous cars (2006 Scion XB, 2001 Insight) is that they donít look very professional.  I pull up to a customerís office and  get a lot of stares.  It feels unprofessional and I think people view these cars as young kids cars (generally).

I think this is all in your head.  I highly doubt anyone cares what kind of car you drive, as long as it's got a muffler and it's not a total rust bucket or piece of crap.  My guess would be that these office people stare at everyone that drives up, as it's something interesting in their otherwise boring day.

rmcculle

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #9 on: October 28, 2013, 06:37:33 PM »
You should consider a new 2013 Mazda 3 sedan.  The 2014's are out and dealers are loaded with left over 2013's.  You can buy one nicely equipped for $16,000.  The car will suit your needs, give you over 30mpg and if properly maintained give you 200k miles.  In my humble opinion, the best bang for your buck in new cars right now.

iamlindoro

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #10 on: October 28, 2013, 07:07:52 PM »
You should consider a new 2013 Mazda 3 sedan.  The 2014's are out and dealers are loaded with left over 2013's.  You can buy one nicely equipped for $16,000.  The car will suit your needs, give you over 30mpg and if properly maintained give you 200k miles.  In my humble opinion, the best bang for your buck in new cars right now.



No new cars! 

http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2011/11/28/new-cars-and-auto-financing-stupid-or-sensible/

TrulyStashin

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2013, 07:14:57 PM »
You should consider a new 2013 Mazda 3 sedan.  The 2014's are out and dealers are loaded with left over 2013's.  You can buy one nicely equipped for $16,000.  The car will suit your needs, give you over 30mpg and if properly maintained give you 200k miles.  In my humble opinion, the best bang for your buck in new cars right now.

Facepunch.  Never, ever buy a new car.  The depreciation is a sukka's bet, every time.

Dude, if you're prioritizing fun and image over freedom, you have more reading to do here and more facepunches in your future.    I know whereof I speak, because a little over a year ago I did exactly what you're doing now.  It was a stupid decision that set me back pretty significantly. 

A car is not like a house because a well-chosen house will hold or even gain value.  A car loses value -- always, no matter what.  A car's role is to get you from point A to point B as efficiently as possible. 

I now drive a 2007 Prius and I freakin' love this car.  The car isn't fun but watching my money accumulate sure is.

cbr shadow

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #12 on: October 28, 2013, 07:56:31 PM »
Thanks everyone for your car opinions.  I posted this while at the office and read the comments as they came in.  By the end of the day I decided to go for the Civic.  I found a 2006 Honda Civic with 39k miles on it.  Looks brand new and was driven by a retired older lady just to get groceries in town.  Ended up paying $10k for it.
As some pointed out above I was really pushing for the Acura, but I think your comments reinforced what I already knew - The roughly $6500 difference is just too much for me to justify having the more flashy car.  That doesn't include the higher insurance rates and worse gas mileage. 
For now I'll settle for lusting for a sports car in the future and continue our high savings rate.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2013, 08:33:14 PM by cbr shadow »

iamlindoro

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #13 on: October 28, 2013, 08:00:42 PM »
Thanks everyone for your car opinions.  I posted this while at the office and read the comments as they came in.  By the end of the day I decided to go for the Civic.  I found a 2006 Honda Civic with $39k miles on it.  Looks brand new and was driven by a retired older lady just to get groceries in town.  Ended up paying $10k for it.
As some pointed out above I was really pushing for the Acura, but I think your comments reinforced what I already knew - The roughly $6500 difference is just too much for me to justify having the more flashy car.  That doesn't include the higher insurance rates and worse gas mileage. 
For now I'll settle for lusting for a sports car in the future and continue our high savings rate.

You are the man.  Awesome choice (and not just because I agree with you, but because the thought process is totally mustachian).

TrulyStashin

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #14 on: October 29, 2013, 04:16:54 AM »
Standing and clapping for you.  Well played!

daverobev

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #15 on: October 29, 2013, 08:24:28 AM »
Ugh, ok well.. what's done is done - http://www.carcomplaints.com/Honda/Civic/2006/ - 2006 is the first of the 8th gen and has issues with the engine block cracking. Hopefully yours either has had it fixed, or won't be one with the problem, but...

Forcus

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #16 on: October 29, 2013, 10:00:34 AM »
I struggled with this same issue (and still do from time to time). I am in marketing so of course, we are all about parties and posters, style over substance, etc. (though I am not in a position where my appearance, and car, actually would affect my success)

I drive a green 2002 Focus ZX5 (5 door hatch). I don't think there is a straight panel on it (maybe the roof). The paint is peeling off the wheels. It leaves a little bit of fluid marking its territory. And so on. It's something of a running joke around the office. I do get the stares and at first it was embarrassing. But then I get real smug thinking about how I have a paid for car, spend virtually nothing in maintenance, and somewhere between 40 and 50 I will no longer have to be worried about sitting in a cubicle getting fat and doing work I don't care about. When I'm 60 I'm not going to be thinking about any of these people, about the work I used to do, or what I was driving at the time 30 years ago. I'll be doing what I want, when I want, on my own time. So yes I occassionally get the urge to buy something new or newer but end up talking myself down with the above prepackaged argument. Works every time.

dadof4

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #17 on: October 29, 2013, 10:55:29 AM »
Facepunch.  Never, ever buy a new car.  The depreciation is a sukka's bet, every time.
Careful with those facepunches, you might hurt someone :)

While this is a good rule of thumb, it is certainly NOT a universal truth. There are several exceptions.

Yes, all new cars will have a very rapid depreciation from MSRP to used. For a 20k commuter sedan, this is around 5-6k in the first year (compared to around 1.5k for year 1-2).

But there are ways to avoid it.
1. Buy below MSRP. Keep car hunting, and you will find deals out there. My Mazda6 was 5k under MSRP, and the first year depreciation is similar to second or third year depreciation.

2. Finance at stupid terms. Instead of paying 10k in cash for a used car, you could get 0% financing from some dealers or 2% from your credit union. Investing it at 7% return will further reduce your net equity loss from owning a new car.

3. There are typically fewer repair costs with a new car.

So financially it isn't always a bad deal. And if you plan to keep it for a while, it is good to know that it is well maintained from the start. And then there's the new car smell :)


daverobev

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #18 on: October 29, 2013, 01:41:41 PM »
Facepunch.  Never, ever buy a new car.  The depreciation is a sukka's bet, every time.
Careful with those facepunches, you might hurt someone :)

While this is a good rule of thumb, it is certainly NOT a universal truth. There are several exceptions.

Yes, all new cars will have a very rapid depreciation from MSRP to used. For a 20k commuter sedan, this is around 5-6k in the first year (compared to around 1.5k for year 1-2).

But there are ways to avoid it.
1. Buy below MSRP. Keep car hunting, and you will find deals out there. My Mazda6 was 5k under MSRP, and the first year depreciation is similar to second or third year depreciation.

2. Finance at stupid terms. Instead of paying 10k in cash for a used car, you could get 0% financing from some dealers or 2% from your credit union. Investing it at 7% return will further reduce your net equity loss from owning a new car.

3. There are typically fewer repair costs with a new car.

So financially it isn't always a bad deal. And if you plan to keep it for a while, it is good to know that it is well maintained from the start. And then there's the new car smell :)

New Car Smell might actually be carcinogenic (VOCs).

Usually, 0% financing is not 'free' (ie, cash price will be below financed price).

There shouldn't be any significant repairs for the fist few years... though timing belts etc are expensive, they are regular wear items...

And then there is the cost of insuring a financed car...

Personally I'd rather go for an older car, so it's not a question of brand new vs 1-3 years. The real calculation should be something like:

(total cost of purchase, repairs - sale value) / years owned

Tires, brakes, etc are obviously moot, though there is some factoring for buying a used car with 50% tread vs a new with 100%...

dadof4

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2013, 03:30:15 PM »
New Car Smell might actually be carcinogenic (VOCs).
I can't think of a better way to go.

Usually, 0% financing is not 'free' (ie, cash price will be below financed price).
I admittedly have little experience with this. Before my current car, I always bought used and paid cash.
But from my negotiations during last year's car hunt (with a couple of Toyota dealers who had this promotion), 0% APR was a benefit coming from the manufacturer, the dealer had little leeway to drop the price. In other periods, you could opt fora 750 discount instead.

Either way, you need to factor in savings from both price point and financing.

(total cost of purchase, repairs - sale value) / years owned
More or less correct. I like your calculation because it helps with an apples to apples comparison of holding a car longer.
New cars depreciate faster, but have fewer repairs. If that figure is close though, I'd rather have the new car.
 
Let's look at 3 scenarios. Let's say we're buying a Toyota Corrolla LE, and driving 10k miles a year.
I see a new 2013 one selling for 16k.
From KBB - 2010 with 30k miles = 12k
2003 with 100k Miles = 6k
1998 with 150k Miles = 3k
Repairs are estimated.

1. Buy new, hold for 10 years. Using my  numbers: paid 16k. Will sell for 6k.  Will cost $4k in repairs during that time.
    16-6+4 / 10 = $1400 a year. 
2. Buy 3 year old. hold for 7 years. Pay 12k. Sell for 6k. Will cost $4k in repairs during that time.
    12-6+4/7 =$1430 a year
3. Buy 10 year old car. hold for 5 years. Pay 6k. Sell for 3k. Spend 3k in repairs.
    6-3+3/5 = $1200 a year.

So you're right, the old car is a better value. But not by much.

SunshineGirl

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #20 on: October 29, 2013, 04:30:50 PM »
Given your income, lack of debt, and life situation, I would have recommended that you get whatever car you want, assuming you're paying cash for it and that it won't impact your rate of savings significantly.

But that's just me and the mood I'm in today. My car choice was influenced by the fact that I have kids, and I am greatly looking forward to the next time I get a new(ish) car that I pick up just for me.


Paul der Krake

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #21 on: October 29, 2013, 04:46:00 PM »
When I'm 60 I'm not going to be thinking about any of these people, about the work I used to do, or what I was driving at the time 30 years ago. I'll be doing what I want, when I want, on my own time.
QFT. That's a great way to look at it.

dadof4

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #22 on: October 29, 2013, 05:03:15 PM »
When I'm 60 I'm not going to be thinking about any of these people, about the work I used to do, or what I was driving at the time 30 years ago. I'll be doing what I want, when I want, on my own time.
QFT. That's a great way to look at it.
I dunno. My dad still reminisces about the cars he had 30 or 40 years ago, about work he did, or people he knew.

Happiness is about balance. Be smart, plan for the future, but don't ignore the present. If something gives you joy and is within reason, go for it.

daverobev

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #23 on: October 29, 2013, 06:12:52 PM »
New Car Smell might actually be carcinogenic (VOCs).
I can't think of a better way to go.

Usually, 0% financing is not 'free' (ie, cash price will be below financed price).
I admittedly have little experience with this. Before my current car, I always bought used and paid cash.
But from my negotiations during last year's car hunt (with a couple of Toyota dealers who had this promotion), 0% APR was a benefit coming from the manufacturer, the dealer had little leeway to drop the price. In other periods, you could opt fora 750 discount instead.

Either way, you need to factor in savings from both price point and financing.

(total cost of purchase, repairs - sale value) / years owned
More or less correct. I like your calculation because it helps with an apples to apples comparison of holding a car longer.
New cars depreciate faster, but have fewer repairs. If that figure is close though, I'd rather have the new car.
 
Let's look at 3 scenarios. Let's say we're buying a Toyota Corrolla LE, and driving 10k miles a year.
I see a new 2013 one selling for 16k.
From KBB - 2010 with 30k miles = 12k
2003 with 100k Miles = 6k
1998 with 150k Miles = 3k
Repairs are estimated.

1. Buy new, hold for 10 years. Using my  numbers: paid 16k. Will sell for 6k.  Will cost $4k in repairs during that time.
    16-6+4 / 10 = $1400 a year. 
2. Buy 3 year old. hold for 7 years. Pay 12k. Sell for 6k. Will cost $4k in repairs during that time.
    12-6+4/7 =$1430 a year
3. Buy 10 year old car. hold for 5 years. Pay 6k. Sell for 3k. Spend 3k in repairs.
    6-3+3/5 = $1200 a year.

So you're right, the old car is a better value. But not by much.

IF you can get 0% that actually is 0%, then sure. One thing that's distorted the used market lately is the dearth of new cars bought in the great recession a few years ago, meaning there are few newer used ones now. On the other hand, there are LOTS of new sales now, so there should be a glut in a few years.

Oh, the other thing is - if you *are* paying cash - bear in mind, the more you pay up front, the greater the opportunity cost. Now, for OP, you're talking a few % of a relatively minor amount - but for many/most people, the difference between - just say - $15k invested and $5k invested is going to make a difference.

Anyway - it's absolutely down to the person buying, but they should be informed as to the costs. In the OPs case, really, it's not going to make much difference. It's the idiots who buy new every three years.. ugh! What a waste!

theSchmett

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #24 on: October 29, 2013, 07:02:15 PM »
My 2 cents:

A) You are doing really well. High income low debt... there are plenty of smart choices in vehicles that aren't perfectly mustachian, ,but with MMM principals you can do well.

B) Get the Fit. We got a pretty loaded 2010 Fit Sport because resale will be higher on the Sport model, and we even got the AWFUL nav system because it was a packaged item with stability control. I  know MMM thinks safety is too expensive, I respectfully disagree. My wife drives too far to work everyday, and  that's not changing, but if over all the miles she logs in all kinds of weather the stability control keeps her  out of one  accident, it has paid for itself. Avoid the perfectly awful nav system unless you too believe in buying a little safety.

Also - its fun. Sure, our last car was a 1999 Corolla (manual) and a 1993 Jeep Wrangler Sport (different kind of  fun), and currently I drive a 2005 Focus Wagon (not fun but v. practical) but  the FIT  IS  FUN.

Read the reviews.  Even the crazies on British Top Gear like it. Its got a light feel, its quick, and it handles pretty well. I think the reviews said it was "flingable".


Forcus

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #25 on: October 30, 2013, 08:22:54 AM »
When I'm 60 I'm not going to be thinking about any of these people, about the work I used to do, or what I was driving at the time 30 years ago. I'll be doing what I want, when I want, on my own time.
QFT. That's a great way to look at it.
I dunno. My dad still reminisces about the cars he had 30 or 40 years ago, about work he did, or people he knew.

Happiness is about balance. Be smart, plan for the future, but don't ignore the present. If something gives you joy and is within reason, go for it.

I don't disagree. I was looking at it in the context of a daily driver. I also have a 1987 Grand Marquis my grandpa bought new and a 1974 International pickup that my wife gave me as an engagement present. I do put value (sentimental, mostly) in those things. Just not my daily beater, as a way to impress other people (the context here is where I work most people are making under 100k but many of the vehicles are $50k+, many of them are new trucks being driven at minimum 30-40 miles round trip @ less than 20 MPG). It is fun though to spot executive-types that are frugal though. My boss' boss makes probably 300k a year and drives a 10 year old Dodge Dakota. The CEO makes in the 10's of millions per year and drives a 5 year old (ish) F150 to work. No chauffer.

cbr shadow

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Re: Car decisions, my situation.
« Reply #26 on: October 30, 2013, 09:20:55 AM »
Ugh, ok well.. what's done is done - http://www.carcomplaints.com/Honda/Civic/2006/ - 2006 is the first of the 8th gen and has issues with the engine block cracking. Hopefully yours either has had it fixed, or won't be one with the problem, but...

Well you really know how to kill a party, negative nancy.  haha just kidding, but I did read that exact post 2 nights ago.  I looked on Civic forums where people were in a similar situation as me (considering buying a 2006 civic) and asked about reliability.  Apparently this issue affects a very small number of 06 civics.  Fingers crossed that mine isn't one of them.
Something to consider... look up other cars on that website.  Generally only very negative feedback will show up on a website like that, since a satisfied customer isn't as likely to post a review.
On the Honda forums people say that the 06 Civic is generally an extremely reliable car.  Apparently 2005 Civics had some transmission issues, but those are also considered very reliable.