Author Topic: can you help figure our the kwph on my DVR's and the costs?  (Read 2688 times)

unplugged

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can you help figure our the kwph on my DVR's and the costs?
« on: March 18, 2013, 08:40:25 AM »
I have tried for a few days to figure this out and a call to my electric company did not help either. I am trying to see what my Direct TV DVRS's are using per month. I have 2. I am itching to buy out my contract at $400 and I think knowing the electric costs every month will help push me to finally do this. I keep reading that these boxes are power hogs etc..?

First 650 kWh @ 8.32 per kWh is my summer rate.

My Direct TV DVR boxes apparently use 40w and they run 24/7 with no sleep mode? A news article said they use more than a fridge?!

I don't know how to convert KWh to w. Can anyone tell me what these boxes are costing me per month?

There is some news on Windstream that looks like my state will finally get working DSL (that we pay for). This will open up Netflix for me. I have done my homework and none of my shows are on Hulu, Netflix, not free online. I am very bummed as I enjoy about 20-30 minutes of tv a day and no more.  I will miss my shows terribly but 20-30 minutes per day is not worth $68 per month plus the energy consumptions issues. I would be happier if I could unplug the TV and box in between use but that wont work and wont record my show. I like to avoid all commercials etc. I believe with a Roku I can unplug it and the TV and save energy. Though my TV may try to reprogram and so long channel searched each time?

It looks like I will have to pay $400 to get out but that should be paid back pretty quickly.

Thanks if you can help me with the math!!!!!!!

Cecil

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Re: can you help figure our the kwph on my DVR's and the costs?
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2013, 08:48:29 AM »
Quote
use 40w and they run 24/7

40 watts * 24 hours / day = 960 watt-hours / day. Times 30 days = 28.8kWh / month. That's about $2.40/month at your rate.

unitsinc

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Re: can you help figure our the kwph on my DVR's and the costs?
« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2013, 08:51:12 AM »
Quote
use 40w and they run 24/7

40 watts * 24 hours / day = 960 watt-hours / day. Times 30 days = 28.8kWh / month. That's about $2.40/month at your rate.

Each. So both will run you a bit under $4.80 a month.

Daley

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Re: can you help figure our the kwph on my DVR's and the costs?
« Reply #3 on: March 18, 2013, 09:47:16 AM »
If you're afraid of trying to do the math, there's a real handy calculator for crunching those numbers here. Here's your numbers specifically.

Also, never just go by the sticker on the box for calculating power usage, you'll get a skewed result. Check to see if your local library has a Kill-A-Watt available to borrow, or buy one used off Amazon for well under $20. They're surprisingly handy for tracking down vampire power draws.

unplugged

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Re: can you help figure our the kwph on my DVR's and the costs?
« Reply #4 on: March 18, 2013, 10:50:52 AM »
Thanks everyone! I think I'm going to buy one of those Kill-A-Watts.

The $5 per month for 2 DVR boxes doesn't sound that bad until you start comparing it to other appliances. I read today that we can turn off some items at the circuit-breaker box?  I was thinking of doing that on my AC for spring/fall? Is that too extreme and bad for any of the equipment? I think we have an electric heat pump AC. Looks like my water heater is costing me more than pretty much anything else.


Jamesqf

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Re: can you help figure our the kwph on my DVR's and the costs?
« Reply #5 on: March 18, 2013, 11:01:54 AM »
Looks like my water heater is costing me more than pretty much anything else.

That's generally true.  One thing you can do there is to turn down the temperature.  Keeping the water at about 120F instead of 180F will save a good bit, and also reduce the chance of scald accidents.

A/C and heat pump shouldn't be drawing significant power unless they're actually heating or cooling.