Author Topic: Buying insulation - DIY Attick  (Read 2850 times)

MrSal

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Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« on: September 26, 2015, 05:40:43 AM »
It comes that time of the year where we are thinking of adding insulation to our attic.

My question is fiberglass batts or cellulose? I am thinking cellulose might be better in terms of r value and easiness of the job.

Also, where and when are the best deals? My local Lowes and HD have each bag for 12.33 dollars, this is in Central PA. I have tried changing locations to nearby stores - where I have had luck on different prices before - but price remains the same.

Any ideas where I should look?

Any ideas when do these companies run sales on insulation?


EDIT: Holy mother EFFER! I was playing with the Change your store feature... and in a store in DE it currently is sittint at 3 dollars per bag !!!!!! The store is at 100 miles away from me if only I had a big truck!!!

EDIT2: They are out of stock in that store :(
« Last Edit: September 26, 2015, 05:50:40 AM by MrSal »

szmaine

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #1 on: September 26, 2015, 07:22:16 AM »
You'll get better air sealing from cellulose. Also, deters rodents from nesting. I wouldn't fret about the price, its probably going to be about the same cost in most places...tho $3 would have been a great deal. Make sure you do rent the blower for installation rather than pouring it in, it makes a big difference in the loft as well as the air sealing. In my area,  HD used to offer free use of the blower if so many bags were purchased - so you might ask about that.

TomTX

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #2 on: September 26, 2015, 07:32:35 AM »
Cellulose. Cellulose. Cellulose.

Nicer to work with, air seals MUCH better, doesn't lose R value as much in cold temperatures.

Make sure to use a store that gives you free use of a blower (or purchase cheap enough that you can rent a good blower with the savings)

Make sure you have at least 1 partner/assistant. Someone to feed the machine, someone to work the hose. Nice to also have a general gopher to bring drinks, tidy up wrappers, etc.

MrSal

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #3 on: September 26, 2015, 11:14:18 AM »
Does 12.33 a bag seem like a good price?

Even at this price, at Lowes I can get it down to 9.31 dollars out of pocket per bag.

If only, HD had the same product for even 0.01 cheaper and I could price match at lowes with another 10% off!!

szmaine

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #4 on: September 26, 2015, 01:14:51 PM »
It seems quite average. These days all the big box stores monitor each other's pricing...I've seen this when price shopping online. It's not worth your time and energy usually. You could check craigslist for someone with leftovers though...I got 10 bales in my barn leftover from a miscalculating... Might be worth looking.

Kroaler

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #5 on: September 26, 2015, 03:00:20 PM »
Anyone really stuff their attic with insulation yet? I have about 8 inches living in the south east.  In the summer and winter my poor HVAC struggles to keep up. I think I need to wrap my ductwork with more insulation also.  But as far as attic insulation, has anybody really gone overboard and seen a big difference?   Say 20+ inches?  And how about ridge vents and attic fans, anyone recommend those?

Spork

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #6 on: September 26, 2015, 03:10:10 PM »
Well, it isn't really DIY.  And it can be a little difficult to put in after construction... but I REALLY LOVE foam.

It seems to really seal well.  We went from a 600sqft pink fiberglass bat building to a 2400sqft foam building and our HVAC costs went way down.  (There were other factors here too.  It wasn't all insulation.)

The other nice thing about it is that usually you insulate at the roof line instead of at ceiling level.  This means your entire attic is approximately the same temperature as the house.  You aren't running duct work through a boiling summer/freezing winter attic.

MrSal

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #7 on: September 26, 2015, 03:25:47 PM »
Well, it isn't really DIY.  And it can be a little difficult to put in after construction... but I REALLY LOVE foam.

It seems to really seal well.  We went from a 600sqft pink fiberglass bat building to a 2400sqft foam building and our HVAC costs went way down.  (There were other factors here too.  It wasn't all insulation.)

The other nice thing about it is that usually you insulate at the roof line instead of at ceiling level.  This means your entire attic is approximately the same temperature as the house.  You aren't running duct work through a boiling summer/freezing winter attic.

Our ductwork is actually in the basement in between the ground level joists or basement ceiling

TomTX

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Re: Buying insulation - DIY Attick
« Reply #8 on: September 26, 2015, 04:12:40 PM »
Anyone really stuff their attic with insulation yet? I have about 8 inches living in the south east.  In the summer and winter my poor HVAC struggles to keep up. I think I need to wrap my ductwork with more insulation also.  But as far as attic insulation, has anybody really gone overboard and seen a big difference?   Say 20+ inches?  And how about ridge vents and attic fans, anyone recommend those?

First you rationalize your ductwork. Smooth curves, no kinks, no restrictions. Then you properly and thoroughly seal the ductwork. THEN you make sure the insulation on the ductwork is good.

Most ductwork I've seen in Texas looks like it was put together by drunken retarded monkeys.  I cut 4-8 feet off EACH duct run when I redid them, and had smoother curves to boot. And removed a 50% restriction in the form of a hacked-together "splitter" that was just horrid.

After the ducts are good, get some canned spray foam sealer and seal up every attic penetration. Vents, lights, pipes, et cetera. No leaks.

THEN you go blow in cellulose.