Author Topic: Buying classics  (Read 7691 times)

RunningFromSpider

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Buying classics
« on: August 28, 2013, 12:39:15 AM »
What are some classic things that you consider are important?  By classic I mean something of great quality that will last a long time, not trendy designer products.

Last year I made the mistake of buying some "cheap" furniture and I've come to regret my choice as they fell apart rather quickly and are also uncomfortable to use.  The pleather on my office chair has already begun to peel after only one year and it's also not the most comfortable chair.  I've learned from my mistake and I'll definitely be more choosy with furniture that I use regularly.  Part of being frugal is buying high quality things that last for years so you don't have to keep buying junk and wrecking your wallet and the environment.

So what are some staples that you splurge on?

Silvie

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #1 on: August 28, 2013, 01:22:30 AM »
To be honest, most of my furniture comes from IKEA. I find it quite cheap, but good quality. Good value for money. If it doesn't bother you that you can probably find the exact same stuff in other people's houses, as it's far from unique :)

I guess these days I am willing to spend a bit more on good clothes that last a long time, but I also have lots of stuff from H&M and Primark.

viverl

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2013, 01:26:32 AM »
I guess these days I am willing to spend a bit more on good clothes that last a long time, but I also have lots of stuff from H&M and Primark.

There actually is a big difference between Primark and H&M quality - I didn't think so at first but after one year with Primark clothing that is falling apart and H&M clothing that I still wear from 5 years ago - Primark is even worse than H&M.

basd

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #3 on: August 28, 2013, 01:29:35 AM »
Here's another thread you might be able to get some suggestions from:

https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/reader-recommendations/buy-it-for-life!/

I'm still considering buying a Saddleback wallet.

Silvie

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #4 on: August 28, 2013, 01:32:54 AM »
I guess these days I am willing to spend a bit more on good clothes that last a long time, but I also have lots of stuff from H&M and Primark.

There actually is a big difference between Primark and H&M quality - I didn't think so at first but after one year with Primark clothing that is falling apart and H&M clothing that I still wear from 5 years ago - Primark is even worse than H&M.

True, but Primark is even cheaper than H&M. I wouldn't buy all my clothes there, but some basics like T-shirts are fine. Wearing it for a year is worth 2.50 IMO.

gooki

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #5 on: August 28, 2013, 01:34:46 AM »
Cast iron frying pan

Furniture made from real timber, no veneered particleboard/mdf stuff

Entery level cars

Whiteware without digital displays. Knobs and buttons last twice as long.

SnackDog

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2013, 01:51:07 AM »
A friend of mine in college bought a Dodge Dart for $50.  It ran fine for about four years and got him around town. We joked that if he got towed for a parking violation, it might be cheaper to buy another Dart than pay the tow fee.

Dr. A

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2013, 06:17:39 AM »
Cast iron frying pan
+1

This is what turned me from a guy who didn't mind cooking into one who loves it. Plus, for $20, it's a pan my great-grandchildren will be able to use.

Basenji

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #8 on: August 29, 2013, 07:03:01 AM »
+1 for cast iron or for any heavy-duty cookware
Old-fashioned leather shoes that can be re-heeled are worth it. Husband has a pair of work boots he has had re-heeled several times over 25 years.
Linen/cotton napkins last forever and can be found at yard sales or consignment shops
L.L Bean canvas tote bags: I have had one going on 25 years. I recently repaired some loose stitching with dental floss. 
L.L. Bean snow boots: 10 years and counting, they still look almost new
More than 50-year-old quality wood furniture

Spork

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #9 on: August 29, 2013, 08:19:45 AM »
A friend of mine in college bought a Dodge Dart for $50.  It ran fine for about four years and got him around town. We joked that if he got towed for a parking violation, it might be cheaper to buy another Dart than pay the tow fee.

I have a fugly 1981 pickup truck that I literally got in trade for a large pizza with everything on it.


edit:
But to add to the actual topic:  older non-computerized appliances.  If they're electric, there may be a trade-off in cost of operation.  If they're not (like a gas range, for example) you'll find that they work better, work forever and don't die when there is a power surge.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2013, 08:21:46 AM by Spork »

Jamesqf

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #10 on: August 29, 2013, 09:48:48 PM »
'88 Toyota pickup.  Did cost considerably more than a pizza, but I expect to keep driving it for many years.

I'd say the Thinkpad T60 laptop is a bit of a classic.  Maybe 6 years old now (which is like almost a century in computer years), yet still does most of what I need for day-to-day work.  I am going to have to replace the fan soon, though, and maybe add an SSD.

gooki

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #11 on: August 30, 2013, 01:00:02 AM »
I highly recommend the SSD upgrade for older laptops. My 7 year old HP NW9440 rockets along with windows 8 and a cheap SSD.

Mr.Macinstache

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #12 on: August 30, 2013, 08:54:19 AM »
Anything made from the 50's or 60's is generally great quality. And if it breaks it can be fixed unlike today's stuff.

Roses

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #13 on: September 03, 2013, 12:52:59 AM »
I've had the same issue with furniture and am slowly replacing cheap pieces with good quality ones.  But it doesn't have to be expensive.  I get almost everything used.  I check craigslist and garage sales and occasionally find great deals on solid wood pieces that will last indefinitely.  Like the mission style sideboard I found last year which holds up beautifully to toddlers running into in on their wheely toys - unlike my 3 year-old dining table from Pier 1 Imports which looks like it's been through several wars. 

I do have trouble finding good quality clothes that don't look ancient after just a few washes - especially cotton items.

Mr.Macinstache

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #14 on: September 03, 2013, 11:42:24 AM »
Craigslist is excellent for finding mid-century modern furniture.

footenote

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Re: Buying classics
« Reply #15 on: September 03, 2013, 11:45:40 AM »
Roses - My LLBean cotton items have held up very well. For items like cotton jersey tops I am religious about line drying them. This helps them keep their shape and color.