Author Topic: Bokashi Composting - anyone doing it? Any tips to get started?  (Read 3007 times)

zachd

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 102

Really want to start composting... both to get compost to help garden grow... and to be able to get a smaller trash can to lower our trash bill.. and just in general to be less wasteful.. you know the typicaly reasons for composting.

This Bokashi sounds pretty cool.. and they make it sound easy.. not having to carry stuff outside all the time seems like a plus.  I suppose there is a matter of it costing more and not being free since you have to buy the bran stuff that makes the composting happen.  Not sure if that is something you have to buying continually or if it's sort of like with other fermentation once you start it you always have some matter that will keep the fermentation going.

If anyone has any experience with this, would like to hear it and what you use for it bucket-wise..
thanks

Thegoblinchief

  • Guest
Re: Bokashi Composting - anyone doing it? Any tips to get started?
« Reply #1 on: March 03, 2014, 04:27:59 PM »
No experience with it myself. If you want indoor composting, a worm bin is easy. I know quite a few people who do this since they can't compost outdoors.

What I do is have a gallon size pail next to door. I empty that outside in the actual bin every day, washing the pail every few days to avoid mold.

MarcherLady

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3776
  • Age: 6
  • Location: Somewhere North of the Arctic Circle, UK
Re: Bokashi Composting - anyone doing it? Any tips to get started?
« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2014, 04:04:29 AM »
I looked into it a few years ago, yes, you do need to buy the bran stuff every time.  I had access to outside composting for free, so it wasn't a good deal for us.  A quick internet search will find you instructions on how to make the bran at home, which would bring down the cost and might make it worthwhile, but free is better, IMHO.

Worm farms seem cool, but I've heard tales of the worms wanting to explore the house, and also of people having issues with fruit flies.  All in all, a small, lidded, bucket next to the back door emptied regularly into an outside compost bin works best for us.  I use a 10 liter food grade storage tupperware style bin with a carrying handle, which is plenty big enough for us. (2 people, emptied weekly in the winter, because it's cold and dark, and daily in the summer)
 

Nords

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3274
  • Age: 59
  • Location: Oahu
    • Military Retirement & Financial Independence blog
Re: Bokashi Composting - anyone doing it? Any tips to get started?
« Reply #3 on: March 04, 2014, 10:16:53 AM »
Worm farms seem cool, but I've heard tales of the worms wanting to explore the house, and also of people having issues with fruit flies.
It's a common result when they're not doing it right.

The lid doesn't have to be airtight, but it should be tight enough to encourage the worms to crawl somewhere else.  Vermiposting worms are photophobic, so when the container is set up off the ground then the worms won't crawl outside... as long as it's light out.  Industrial vermiposters actually put night lights under their containers, but we've never had a problem with night-wandering worms. 

Fruit flies are handled by laying 2"-3" of shredded newspaper on top of the food (inside the lid).  The newspaper is eventually vermiposted, too, so more has to be added occasionally.

MustachianAccountant

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 433
  • Age: 42
Re: Bokashi Composting - anyone doing it? Any tips to get started?
« Reply #4 on: March 04, 2014, 12:26:34 PM »
Worm farms seem cool, but I've heard tales of the worms wanting to explore the house, and also of people having issues with fruit flies.
It's a common result when they're not doing it right.

The lid doesn't have to be airtight, but it should be tight enough to encourage the worms to crawl somewhere else.  Vermiposting worms are photophobic, so when the container is set up off the ground then the worms won't crawl outside... as long as it's light out.  Industrial vermiposters actually put night lights under their containers, but we've never had a problem with night-wandering worms. 

Fruit flies are handled by laying 2"-3" of shredded newspaper on top of the food (inside the lid).  The newspaper is eventually vermiposted, too, so more has to be added occasionally.

THANK YOU!!! We've been having trouble with fruit flies around the worm bin (and elsewhere). I'll be using the shredder tonight....

(By the way, check Craigslist for local worm farmers if you want to buy worms to get into vermicomposting. We paid about half of what websites charge by going through CL.)
« Last Edit: March 04, 2014, 12:28:12 PM by MustachianAccountant »