Author Topic: BIKES  (Read 7001 times)

Zx

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BIKES
« on: April 11, 2015, 01:51:52 PM »
I have decided that whether or not I get the CA job, I will sell the Sentra and bike to work. If I get the CA job, I will pack it in the truck and take it to CA. If not, then I have a bike to ride to work here.

I'd like to have some advice about what kind of bike would serve my purposes best and what kind of gear would be most comfortable/useful.

Here: It's shorter to take the two lane country roads, but I can go around the longer way and be in "town". I work ten hour shifts and one-way it's 17 miles, so to arrive at 6 a.m. I need to leave by 4:30, at least, until I get into good enough shape to push it closer to an hour. It'll be dark, obviously. Then after a 10 hour day it's 18 miles back in the evening. It's Oregon, so it rains heavily here sometimes.

In CA: where I'd live is right on what's called the Iron Trail, an asphalt walking/biking path. It literally forms the boundary of the property on one side. Only 8 1/4 miles later, straight-as-an-arrow North, this same path cuts right through the complex where I would work. Of course, this is the bay area and CA is in drought, so it won't rain much. The only problems I foresee are being pitted out all day from the bike ride in and stinking up the office AND the fact that, at least at night, this asphalt path can be a little "scary", as it can be lonely and who knows what opportunistic people might see an opportunity. But there will be no cars or traffic lights AND it's a straight shot, biking to work as the crow flies.

When we sell the Sentra, I math the savings out to : 252 monthly payment + 100 monthly insurance + 100 in fuel; so, we'll save about 450 per month. I figure it's good to have a decent quality bike, so even if I spend what seems to be an ungodly amount of 900 dollars for a bike that lasts for the next 15 years, it will pay for itself in 2 months.

With this info, what kind of suggestions as to a bike and gear can you make?

I'd also like to know what you people do about arriving at work by muscle power and no longer smelling fresh?
« Last Edit: April 11, 2015, 01:54:28 PM by dagiffy1 »

sol

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2015, 02:36:35 PM »
even if I spend what seems to be an ungodly amount of 900 dollars for a bike that lasts for the next 15 years, it will pay for itself in 2 months.

Keep in mind that bikes, like cars, do have some ongoing maintenance costs.  They're not free to operate over a 15 year time frame.  Depending on how much you ride, every few years you'll need new tires and tubes and brake pads, and if you're not handy then you'll pay for the occasional tune up.

Quote
With this info, what kind of suggestions as to a bike and gear can you make?

If you stay stuck with that 35 mile per day round trip commute, I'd seriously consider an e-bike.

For the shorter option, I think the most important factors are (a) puncture proof tires so you don't have to deal with flats, (b) super bright led lights for riding so much in the dark, (c) after market fenders for days that it rains, and (d) a backup plan like a cellphone with a taxi company's phone number, just in case.  The type of bike you get is totally up to you, but for those distances I'd be looking for a road bike with skinny smooth tires and curved bars.

Quote
I'd also like to know what you people do about arriving at work by muscle power and no longer smelling fresh?

Slow down?  New cyclists seem to think that biking is some crazy form of aerobic exercise that will leave them red-faced and drained, and it certainly can be if you're pushing yourself the whole way.  But why do that if you're worried about being sweaty?  Take a chill pill, downshift a few clicks, and enjoy the scenery.

Breaker

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #2 on: April 11, 2015, 03:05:48 PM »
Hi,

I'm not sure but if you are thinking about riding the Iron Horse Trail a road bike should be best.  As for what type and what size you must go into a good bike shop and look around.  Some of them are more helpful than others so if your not happy with the way you are treated when doing your initial shopping just try another shop.

I just bought a bike at Livermore Cyclery and told them that I just wanted a bike to run errands and that I wanted to be more upright when I rode.  They helped me pick a good bike for me.  Comes with free maintenance though I will have to pay for parts. 

As for the "odor" problem some of the businesses have showers or you can always do a washup in the sinks.   Although I see that my new bike rolls so well compared to the old ones that I doubt I will work up a sweat, as long as I leave enough time for the ride.

 

Fuzz

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #3 on: April 11, 2015, 03:55:14 PM »
Check out: http://thesweethome.com/reviews/best-hybrid-commuter-bike/

Also, I was happy with bikes direct, where I got a motobecane.

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2015, 04:09:20 PM »
Thanks. I will be looking around with your inputs in mind.

kaizen soze

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #5 on: April 11, 2015, 04:32:08 PM »
Re: the odor problem when bike commuting

I find that all that I need to do is change clothes when I get to work.

Learner

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2015, 06:10:33 PM »
For the sweating issue, as above, slow down and dress appropriately.  If you're just starting to bike, you probably will sweat a bit, so a shower / sink bath / baby wipes with a change of clothes will probably help.

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #7 on: April 12, 2015, 10:15:48 AM »
I suppose just riding my bike to work will help. It's the racing my bike to work that will make my downdraft unsavory. Points taken.

Exflyboy

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #8 on: April 12, 2015, 11:58:41 AM »
Your in PDX right?

Performance bike is the place to go.. They have a website, look for last year's models. I bought a very nice roadbike for about $750 with Shimano 105 gear (about one notch down from the very best). The thing is fast.. or easy to pedal slower.

You might also find something on CL too.

Make sure you have a secure place to keep it at work because it will be gone otherwise.

Rubic

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #9 on: April 12, 2015, 03:09:46 PM »
You intend to change clothes when you arrive at work, correct?  (If not, there are other options ...)

Assuming a fresh change of clothes when you arrive at work, you can just slide into the restroom and take a quick "birdbath", wiping down your body by the sink before you put on fresh clothes.

Other advice: Avoid synthetic clothing, as it retains the stink.  Wool is best if its available to you as a clothing option.

Also: people assume it is perspiration that causes you to smell bad, but its mostly bacterial growth.  As counter-intuitive as it may seem, your best bet may be to a take a shower before  you leave home (wiping off the bacteria since you went to bed), then riding at a moderate pace to work.  Save the race sprints for your trip back home!

ClaycordJCA

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #10 on: April 12, 2015, 03:31:34 PM »
Iron Horse Trail from Pleasant Hill BART going south to Pleasanton passes through generally safe areas so encounters with "individuals looking to take advantage" are less likely than going north into Concord and beyond. You will need very good lighting since the trail is not lit at night. You will also need a good lock or two since bicycle thefts are rampant in the area.

Cinder

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #11 on: April 12, 2015, 03:54:00 PM »
I find that all that I need to do is change clothes when I get to work.
For the sweating issue, as above, slow down and dress appropriately.  If you're just starting to bike, you probably will sweat a bit, so a shower / sink bath / baby wipes with a change of clothes will probably help.
You intend to change clothes when you arrive at work, correct?  (If not, there are other options ...)

Assuming a fresh change of clothes when you arrive at work, you can just slide into the restroom and take a quick "birdbath", wiping down your body by the sink before you put on fresh clothes.

Other advice: Avoid synthetic clothing, as it retains the stink.  Wool is best if its available to you as a clothing option.

Also: people assume it is perspiration that causes you to smell bad, but its mostly bacterial growth.  As counter-intuitive as it may seem, your best bet may be to a take a shower before  you leave home (wiping off the bacteria since you went to bed), then riding at a moderate pace to work.  Save the race sprints for your trip back home!


All quoted for truth... as additional info, coupled with the shower before you leave, either use antiperspirant as opposed to deodorant, or even better(cheaper) yet use hand sanitizer!   That will work better!  Also to reiterate above, take it easy in the morning, and push yourself on the way home! 

Also, I tend to keep a collection of clothes at the office, so I always change when I get there and I don't need to lug them around.  I would also recommend making sure you get head/tail lights, a small pump, and keep a spare tube/tire levers and/or a patch kit in your bag.

Rain - I have two bright yellow rain jackets, one at home and one at work.. If I ride in and it's nice, when I ride home I can tuck my back and myself into my second rain-coat and wear it home.  If it's raining for my ride into work, I wear waterproof pants along with my rain jacket.   I also recently got a pair of waterproof, pre-curved cycling gloves as a present this christmas, but I spent two years riding without them.  They are nice for when it's in the 35~55 degree rain, but I got along fine before. 

Also, the first two weeks of riding sucked!  Then my body adapted and they weren't to bad.  That was all with a hybrid/mtn bike.  Then due to construction, my trip changed from 5.5 miles each way to 8 miles each way, and it sucked for a bout two weeks, and then my body adjusted. 

This past summer, I found a 1989 Raleigh Tri-lite at a yardsale for $45, and I doubled the value cost of it by sticking a frame mounted pump (to handle the new stem on the tires) and a set of lights. 

Don't be afraid to have to many lights, bright reflective vests, etc.  Any point where you are on the road with other drivers, it's good to be seen first, though it sounds like a good portion of your trip will be on a bike path, that rocks!

Good luck, I wish you the best!  Cycling to work was one of the best things I'd done for myself!   I tend to listen to technical podcasts while i'm riding, which I don't really get time to do otherwise!


Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #12 on: April 12, 2015, 06:09:48 PM »
Iron Horse Trail from Pleasant Hill BART going south to Pleasanton passes through generally safe areas so encounters with "individuals looking to take advantage" are less likely than going north into Concord and beyond. You will need very good lighting since the trail is not lit at night. You will also need a good lock or two since bicycle thefts are rampant in the area.

If I get the CA job then I will be on the Iron Horse trail at about 5 a.m. and coming back on it around 4 p.m. Probably the best times to be on the trail. I can lock it up at work within the complex but I will take your advice about locking it up. Someone also told me to take my seat and my lights into the office with me or someone might accidentally take them off my bike.

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #13 on: April 12, 2015, 06:22:16 PM »


All quoted for truth... as additional info, coupled with the shower before you leave, either use antiperspirant as opposed to deodorant, or even better(cheaper) yet use hand sanitizer!   That will work better!  Also to reiterate above, take it easy in the morning, and push yourself on the way home! 

Also, I tend to keep a collection of clothes at the office, so I always change when I get there and I don't need to lug them around.  I would also recommend making sure you get head/tail lights, a small pump, and keep a spare tube/tire levers and/or a patch kit in your bag.

Rain - I have two bright yellow rain jackets, one at home and one at work.. If I ride in and it's nice, when I ride home I can tuck my back and myself into my second rain-coat and wear it home.  If it's raining for my ride into work, I wear waterproof pants along with my rain jacket.   I also recently got a pair of waterproof, pre-curved cycling gloves as a present this christmas, but I spent two years riding without them.  They are nice for when it's in the 35~55 degree rain, but I got along fine before. 

Also, the first two weeks of riding sucked!  Then my body adapted and they weren't to bad.  That was all with a hybrid/mtn bike.  Then due to construction, my trip changed from 5.5 miles each way to 8 miles each way, and it sucked for a bout two weeks, and then my body adjusted. 

This past summer, I found a 1989 Raleigh Tri-lite at a yardsale for $45, and I doubled the value cost of it by sticking a frame mounted pump (to handle the new stem on the tires) and a set of lights. 

Don't be afraid to have to many lights, bright reflective vests, etc.  Any point where you are on the road with other drivers, it's good to be seen first, though it sounds like a good portion of your trip will be on a bike path, that rocks!

Good luck, I wish you the best!  Cycling to work was one of the best things I'd done for myself!   I tend to listen to technical podcasts while i'm riding, which I don't really get time to do otherwise!

Thank you, great advice! I bought the bike today, a 2013 Landis Coda Sport (used, of course) for 359 bucks, found on Craigslist. I bought it from a bike tour place downtown and liked that they kept it tuned up.

Also picked up some breathable rain gear, top and bottoms on sale 35% off. I rode the bike home from 2nd Ave and Ash downtown Portland all the way out to SW Tigard where I live, using public transit for about 6 miles. That still left 12 miles to bike and I was completely spent about halfway through. Any uphill at all and I was walking it by the second half. I couldn't believe how much it hurt to sit down after awhile. Hopefully that goes away, too.

I've been out of shape at 20, 30, and 40, but it's worse at 50. I suspect that the ground at all campgrounds has gotten much harder as well. Either that or getting older features a physical decline of some sort. I was never old before and thought it always happened to other people. At least it always had up till now.

Next step is to detail the Sentra and put it up for sale. Our Republic phones arrive this week sometime. Things are marching to a marvel, as Hercule Poirot would say.

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #14 on: April 12, 2015, 06:26:20 PM »
Your in PDX right?

Performance bike is the place to go.. They have a website, look for last year's models. I bought a very nice roadbike for about $750 with Shimano 105 gear (about one notch down from the very best). The thing is fast.. or easy to pedal slower.

You might also find something on CL too.

Make sure you have a secure place to keep it at work because it will be gone otherwise.

We have security onsite and they tell me that in 8 years they haven't lost a bike yet. I'll have to use a bike rack. There are some bicycle storage areas where you can lock your bike up in a little shed-like thing, but there's only about 24 of those and you have to sign up on the wait list because they are all taken. Only one person that I know of rides to work every day, so those things are taken by people who ride in when they feel like it, but out of reach by people like me who will ride in every single workday. Bummer.

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #15 on: April 12, 2015, 06:38:44 PM »
Does your security let you in to work with a change of clothes.  That is my main problem at work for me.

Yes, they do. I bring a backpack in every day. The entrance I use is badge access and no one is there watching except on camera anyway.

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #16 on: April 12, 2015, 08:39:04 PM »
That is nice.  The place I work at I can't even bring in my cellphone.  Security will hold it the entire night if I decided to bring it in through security with me.  I think the security can be a little much, but it is for everyone's protection in the end.

Wow. Who do you work for? NORAD?

darkadams00

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #17 on: April 12, 2015, 09:35:38 PM »
Next step is to detail the Sentra and put it up for sale. Our Republic phones arrive this week sometime. Things are marching to a marvel, as Hercule Poirot would say.

Hercule Poirot...I haven't read a book with him in it in over a decade. Really brought back some faded memories--I read several of them on a month-long hike on the Appalachian Trail. Those books will always bring back some really cool times from 2001-2002.

Re the bike commute question. If you're out of shape at 50 (you don't quantify your level of out-of-shapeness), you will find out a few things quickly. Some of these you've mentioned.

(1) A road bike with drops might be uncomfortable for at least a month on rides approaching 10 miles round-trip if the bike doesn't fit you perfectly.
(2) If you haven't been biking consistently, the level of effort a long ride can bring will surprise you, and the soreness the next day can keep you out of the saddle completely. There's a big difference between reading about someone else's long commutes, imagining yourself doing the same thing, and then actually doing it. 35 mi/day several times a week is extremely long until you've built up some base mileage and gotten accustomed to riding. Right now, I can ride 75+ miles on an outing, but I couldn't run a 9-minute mile pace for more than 3 miles. Running is just a different exercise with different physical requirements, so I would have to work up to a faster pace or longer distance--there's no shortcut in time spent in preparation. So numerous shorter rides are probably going to help you build some base.
(3)  You will get wet. You might get soaked. Given that distance, the time spent on the bike will easily make it possible to leave work high and dry and still get drenched in the last few miles. My commute is only 9 miles one way, and it happens to me on occasion. I've not been able to solve the sweat vs wet issue with rain gear for rides > 5 miles, so I usually just choose to get wet. But that also means wet shoes which aren't dry until two mornings later, so you have to learn to ride wet the next day or have two sets of riding shoes (or use some form of sandals).

I'm glad you're trying a hybrid commute to work your way up to the mileage by splitting busing and biking. Last year I used the hybrid approach with public transit so I could ride shorter miles while recovering from an injury but still ride consistently to keep up some base mileage. Think of this as your training phase. Bike commuting, especially for long distances, is not an 0% or 100% unless you make it that way. My wife wouldn't tackle my 18-mile RT commute daily, but she manages her 9-mile RT commute just fine. For her, my commute would be a 0%, and her own commute is a 100%. If this long commute is your goal, you might need some %'s in between for a while until you get the kinks worked out.

Good luck and welcome to bike commuting!
« Last Edit: April 12, 2015, 09:40:32 PM by darkadams00 »

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #18 on: April 12, 2015, 11:11:01 PM »
Next step is to detail the Sentra and put it up for sale. Our Republic phones arrive this week sometime. Things are marching to a marvel, as Hercule Poirot would say.

Hercule Poirot...I haven't read a book with him in it in over a decade. Really brought back some faded memories--I read several of them on a month-long hike on the Appalachian Trail. Those books will always bring back some really cool times from 2001-2002.

Re the bike commute question. If you're out of shape at 50 (you don't quantify your level of out-of-shapeness), you will find out a few things quickly. Some of these you've mentioned.

(1) A road bike with drops might be uncomfortable for at least a month on rides approaching 10 miles round-trip if the bike doesn't fit you perfectly.
(2) If you haven't been biking consistently, the level of effort a long ride can bring will surprise you, and the soreness the next day can keep you out of the saddle completely. There's a big difference between reading about someone else's long commutes, imagining yourself doing the same thing, and then actually doing it. 35 mi/day several times a week is extremely long until you've built up some base mileage and gotten accustomed to riding. Right now, I can ride 75+ miles on an outing, but I couldn't run a 9-minute mile pace for more than 3 miles. Running is just a different exercise with different physical requirements, so I would have to work up to a faster pace or longer distance--there's no shortcut in time spent in preparation. So numerous shorter rides are probably going to help you build some base.
(3)  You will get wet. You might get soaked. Given that distance, the time spent on the bike will easily make it possible to leave work high and dry and still get drenched in the last few miles. My commute is only 9 miles one way, and it happens to me on occasion. I've not been able to solve the sweat vs wet issue with rain gear for rides > 5 miles, so I usually just choose to get wet. But that also means wet shoes which aren't dry until two mornings later, so you have to learn to ride wet the next day or have two sets of riding shoes (or use some form of sandals).

I'm glad you're trying a hybrid commute to work your way up to the mileage by splitting busing and biking. Last year I used the hybrid approach with public transit so I could ride shorter miles while recovering from an injury but still ride consistently to keep up some base mileage. Think of this as your training phase. Bike commuting, especially for long distances, is not an 0% or 100% unless you make it that way. My wife wouldn't tackle my 18-mile RT commute daily, but she manages her 9-mile RT commute just fine. For her, my commute would be a 0%, and her own commute is a 100%. If this long commute is your goal, you might need some %'s in between for a while until you get the kinks worked out.

Good luck and welcome to bike commuting!

Another Hercule Poirot admirer, cool.

You are SO right. I didn't own a car in 1997 and biked to work and back. I was 32 and just went all out from day 1 racing to work and then racing back. I was never in such condition, though it was about 5 miles one way, in my life. I just thought I could hop back on the saddle again without much issue. Today proved me wrong, and now I'm glad I'm going to hybrid it, too. I don't remember biking ever being this hard before, it really wiped me out the rest of this day.

Zx

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #19 on: April 12, 2015, 11:12:58 PM »
Next step is to detail the Sentra and put it up for sale. Our Republic phones arrive this week sometime. Things are marching to a marvel, as Hercule Poirot would say.

Hercule Poirot...I haven't read a book with him in it in over a decade. Really brought back some faded memories--I read several of them on a month-long hike on the Appalachian Trail. Those books will always bring back some really cool times from 2001-2002.

Re the bike commute question. If you're out of shape at 50 (you don't quantify your level of out-of-shapeness), you will find out a few things quickly. Some of these you've mentioned.

(1) A road bike with drops might be uncomfortable for at least a month on rides approaching 10 miles round-trip if the bike doesn't fit you perfectly.
(2) If you haven't been biking consistently, the level of effort a long ride can bring will surprise you, and the soreness the next day can keep you out of the saddle completely. There's a big difference between reading about someone else's long commutes, imagining yourself doing the same thing, and then actually doing it. 35 mi/day several times a week is extremely long until you've built up some base mileage and gotten accustomed to riding. Right now, I can ride 75+ miles on an outing, but I couldn't run a 9-minute mile pace for more than 3 miles. Running is just a different exercise with different physical requirements, so I would have to work up to a faster pace or longer distance--there's no shortcut in time spent in preparation. So numerous shorter rides are probably going to help you build some base.
(3)  You will get wet. You might get soaked. Given that distance, the time spent on the bike will easily make it possible to leave work high and dry and still get drenched in the last few miles. My commute is only 9 miles one way, and it happens to me on occasion. I've not been able to solve the sweat vs wet issue with rain gear for rides > 5 miles, so I usually just choose to get wet. But that also means wet shoes which aren't dry until two mornings later, so you have to learn to ride wet the next day or have two sets of riding shoes (or use some form of sandals).

I'm glad you're trying a hybrid commute to work your way up to the mileage by splitting busing and biking. Last year I used the hybrid approach with public transit so I could ride shorter miles while recovering from an injury but still ride consistently to keep up some base mileage. Think of this as your training phase. Bike commuting, especially for long distances, is not an 0% or 100% unless you make it that way. My wife wouldn't tackle my 18-mile RT commute daily, but she manages her 9-mile RT commute just fine. For her, my commute would be a 0%, and her own commute is a 100%. If this long commute is your goal, you might need some %'s in between for a while until you get the kinks worked out.

Good luck and welcome to bike commuting!

BTW, what is a road bike with drops?

cerebus

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #20 on: April 12, 2015, 11:53:40 PM »
It might wipe you out the first times that you do it but your body will adapt to the strain; however obviously if you can shorten the commute to work it will help enormously. I'm also seriously needing a new bike but I think I'm going to go the 2ndhand Gumtree route and look at something in the R2000 ($200 ish) range for a 15km daily round trip. I'm very fortunate that my work is above a local gym where I have a cheap membership so I park downstairs and have a gym session if I'm up for it, shower and come upstairs to work. I started biking to work a few months ago and it's the best thing I ever did; I'm saving a nice amount and I've already slimmed down a lot.
« Last Edit: April 13, 2015, 12:14:19 AM by cerebus »

Rubic

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2015, 06:19:00 AM »
Any uphill at all and I was walking it by the second half. I couldn't believe how much it hurt to sit down after awhile. Hopefully that goes away, too.

I've been out of shape at 20, 30, and 40, but it's worse at 50. I suspect that the ground at all campgrounds has gotten much harder as well. Either that or getting older features a physical decline of some sort. I was never old before and thought it always happened to other people. At least it always had up till now.

Another 50+ rider here.  Keep at it and you'll be surprised at how quickly your body adapts, but feel free to walk the hills and take it easy during your phase-in period.  When I first started riding (15 years ago), I got dropped by people who were in their 60's (twenty years my senior), but not long afterward I was riding in ultra-distance events.  Bicycling is forgiving at the low end and challenging at the upper end.  For me it's the perfect combination of recreation and utility.

darkadams00

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2015, 08:11:14 PM »
Drops are racing-style handlebars that curve under, giving the rider multiple hand position options.

Cinder

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Re: BIKES
« Reply #23 on: April 19, 2015, 05:29:08 AM »
http://sheldonbrown.com/deakins/handlebars.html


From the glossary page - http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_dr-z.html#dropbar
Quote
Drop Handlebar
A drop handlebar is one in which the middle of the bar is the highest point, or nearly. Most bicycles built for fast or long-distance riding have drop handlebars, which provide a range of different grip positions, allowing the rider to change positions for variety and to accommodate different road/wind conditions.
The most common style of drop handlebar is the "Męs" bend. Variations include the "randonneur" and "anatomic" bends.


Męs   
Randonneur
The main advantage of drop handlebars is that they offer several different hand positions. For longer rides, the ability to change positions is very desirable. Riding for a long time in any one position tends to be uncomfortable.

People who think they don't like drop handlebars are often actually objecting to the position of the bars on the drop-bar bikes they have tried.

Bikes with drop bars often have the bars mounted rather low and far forward, so that the rider has to lean forward quite a lot to reach the bars, especially the lower "drop " position. If these people tried a bike where the drop bars were placed higher, and closer to the saddle, they might find they really liked them.

I have an article on this topic, called "Hands Up."

Most newer drop handlebars come in either single-groove or double-groove versions, with grooves along the upper section to acommodate brake (and shift) cables running under the handlebar tape.

These grooves are totally unnecessary. Indeed, the double-groove variety is often rather uncomfortable due to the rear groove's causing sharp ridges against the rider's hands.