Author Topic: Bike reccomendation  (Read 1374 times)

Janissary

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Bike reccomendation
« on: March 08, 2021, 06:54:02 AM »
Hi Everybody,

I am looking to buy a used bike for up to $400. I will be using it with a trailer to take my daughter to daycare back and forth. I will probably also stop by at the grocery store since I will have a trailer

I have found a Fuji Roubaix for $300 and owner says it is in good shape other than the tires

I grew up riding a cheap mountain bike spending 6 hours a day on it but I am a caveman when it comes to bike terms and how different components make a difference to the ride of the bike.

My questions are:

Am I going to have trouble adjusting to the drop bar versus the flat bar that I am used to? Can I just use the drop bar like a flat bar ignoring the other parts?

Can I hook a trailer to this bike? Are the trailers typically universal?

What mechanical details I should pay attention to before purchasing and what questions I should ask?

What other bike would you recommend in this price range?



Thanks,

cool7hand

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2021, 08:10:02 AM »
I can't help with a trailer. Don't use one.

Regarding the drop bars, you'll get used to them quickly. It only takes the brain a little while to rewire. But you don't need to use them if you don't care about the aerodynamic boost.

Figure out the width of new brake pads and measure the current ones to see how long they'll last.

Check the tires for strange wear at brake pad contact points.

Ride and check the gears for smooth shifting. Brakes for smooth breaking.

For me, the most important aspect of an otherwise solid bike is fit and feel. Small adjustments to handlebar and seat location and height, and pedal type and length, make huge differences to comfort and not losing power. I would suggest a trip to your local shop, try a whole bunch of bikes, see what feels right in this style of bike, and then search for a used that is close in both fit and features, so that you don't need to tweak much after your purchase.

Good luck!

Janissary

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2021, 08:19:16 AM »
I can't help with a trailer. Don't use one.

Regarding the drop bars, you'll get used to them quickly. It only takes the brain a little while to rewire. But you don't need to use them if you don't care about the aerodynamic boost.

Figure out the width of new brake pads and measure the current ones to see how long they'll last.

Check the tires for strange wear at brake pad contact points.

Ride and check the gears for smooth shifting. Brakes for smooth breaking.

For me, the most important aspect of an otherwise solid bike is fit and feel. Small adjustments to handlebar and seat location and height, and pedal type and length, make huge differences to comfort and not losing power. I would suggest a trip to your local shop, try a whole bunch of bikes, see what feels right in this style of bike, and then search for a used that is close in both fit and features, so that you don't need to tweak much after your purchase.

Good luck!
Thank you

Le Poisson

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2021, 08:42:28 AM »
Some tips with the trailer...

Find one that attaches to the rear wheel's axle. The ones that clamp onto the rear frame will scratch up your paint and be more prone to catching on the rear wheel.

Personally, I preferred an upright seat position (Mountain Bike or Hybrid) for pulling kids since it's easier to turn around to check on them, but I do pull my work trailer (Wike Landscaper) on a gravel bike (Specialized Sedona) and it works fine.

Your price point is bang on for a commuter bike - high enough to get something you can use daily, but not so high that it entices a thief.

Think about how you will lock up the bike AND trailer before you spend too much. This was a challenge for me at my old job after dropping kids off at daycare.

Rocky Mtn FI

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2021, 08:49:59 AM »
Modern bike trailers are pretty adaptable to a wide range of bikes, and I'd be surprised if this bike were an exception.  The most common (but still relatively uncommon) problem you might encounter is a rear quick release skewer that's too short to accommodate the hitch adapter.  It would be easy and cheap for any local bike shop to swap out a longer skewer.

Re: the drop bars, I agree that you'll likely get used to them quickly.  It's probably not accurate to say you can "just use the drop bar like a flat bar ignoring the other parts" since the brakes are in the drops, especially if you're riding in or near traffic.  There are fixes for this if you find yourself unable to get used to riding in the drops, including swapping in a more upright stem to raise the height of the handlebars or trading the drop bar for a horizontal bar.  At some point, of course, the cost may not be worth it to you.

sonofsven

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #5 on: March 08, 2021, 08:57:33 AM »
I would look for something more upright and with a kick stand so your bike doesn't fall over when checking on kiddo.
It's not like you'll want to go fast pulling the trailer!
As far as "speeds" go, the number of different gears on your rear wheel (7,8,9) won't have too great an impact on riding, but the number of chainrings up front will
If you have steep hills you might want three rings on your crankset, the smallest inner ring (granny gear!) will allow you to crank up those hills even slower than walking speed, or you could just get off and push.
Have fun, I really enjoyed those years even if it was slightly terryifing!

Janissary

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #6 on: March 08, 2021, 09:03:55 AM »
I would look for something more upright and with a kick stand so your bike doesn't fall over when checking on kiddo.
It's not like you'll want to go fast pulling the trailer!
As far as "speeds" go, the number of different gears on your rear wheel (7,8,9) won't have too great an impact on riding, but the number of chainrings up front will
If you have steep hills you might want three rings on your crankset, the smallest inner ring (granny gear!) will allow you to crank up those hills even slower than walking speed, or you could just get off and push.
Have fun, I really enjoyed those years even if it was slightly terryifing!
Kick stand is important. I have not thought about it but I will consider it and account for the cost if I need to add one.

FLBiker

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #7 on: March 08, 2021, 09:16:31 AM »
I would look for something more upright and with a kick stand so your bike doesn't fall over when checking on kiddo.
It's not like you'll want to go fast pulling the trailer!
As far as "speeds" go, the number of different gears on your rear wheel (7,8,9) won't have too great an impact on riding, but the number of chainrings up front will
If you have steep hills you might want three rings on your crankset, the smallest inner ring (granny gear!) will allow you to crank up those hills even slower than walking speed, or you could just get off and push.
Have fun, I really enjoyed those years even if it was slightly terryifing!
Kick stand is important. I have not thought about it but I will consider it and account for the cost if I need to add one.

I got a 2-legged kickstand once I started towing my daughter (this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00LNLXML4/).  It's been good, although the bike has still fallen once or twice.  And I just use an aluminum frame MTB (a Gary Fisher Mako).  We got a used Thule Cougar Chariot for free from a neighbor, and it has worked great (DD is now almost 6).  I did have to replace the hitch ball once (because DD got into the trailer before I'd hooked it up to the bike and put pressure on it).  Thule was really easy to work with, though -- the replacement part was probably like $15.  I don't love everything about the design (I don't like the velcro-based weather resistance, I'd prefer snaps or zippers) but it has been very reliable.

And as far as putting it on a bike, it attaches by replacing the rear stem with a stem that has a trailer hitch on it.  I'm not sure if it would work on a road bike as I've never ridden one.  If the stem is the same diameter, it should be fine. 

caleb

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2021, 09:21:10 AM »
That Fuji will work, but I don't think it's ideal as a commuter/utility bike.  The big drawbacks are that it doesn't have mounts for a rack, and the tire size is limited to about 25mm wide.

A really useful commuter bike will have mounting points (called braze-ons) for a rack (at least in the rear, but also possibly in the front), and clearance to use wider tires if you choose (30-40mm).

You can likely find a hybrid (flat bars with wider, smooth tires) from the 90s for <$300 that would work really well.  Common good ones were the Trek Multitrack, the Jamis Coda, and the Schwinn CrissCross.

Le Poisson

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2021, 09:23:21 AM »
One other question/concern... how old is your daughter, and have you ever towed her before? Before spending on a bike and trailer, you may want to test run the route on a borrowed setup. Pre-ride the route with her in the trailer and a friend she trusts for company on a quiet morning (usually a Sunday). If she is uncomfortable, your friend can suggest tweaks. If there are route ideas your friend has for sidestreets or trails, you may get tips from them as well. Ideally this person would be the daycare provider or a family friend who is good with kids, but it rarely is... often it's another dude from a cycling club or something.

In my Town, there is a staff in Town hall who will co-ride with new cycle commuters on their first day.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2021, 10:22:26 AM »
Drop bar bikes are an adjustment when compared to flat bars.  You will go much faster with less effort because it forces your body into a more aerodynamic position.  This position is more bent over though, so can take a little getting used to.  Drop bars also have more positions you can put your hands, which can help relieve stress on longer rides.

Most trailers usually connect to the bike through the rear axle quick release, so you probably shouldn't have problems with that.

Gearing is determined by the size of your chainrings and cogs in the back.  The type of rear derailleur a bike has will determine how wide a range you can get with the cassette on the back (longer allowing wider range).  The bike you've pictured is a racey type bike, and it probably will be geared a little harder than what you want.  Very easy gearing is necessary if you're going to be towing a kid around up any kind of hill . . . even just 50 extra lbs makes a huge difference.  Touring bikes or cyclocross bikes both have dropped bars as well but tend to be geared much easier easier (touring bikes are designed with the idea you'll be lugging around lots of luggage, and cyclocross bikes are used in very up/down muddy conditions).  Might be worth holding out for one of those.

I think you can get by without racks if you've got a trailer so that's not a big deal.  The trailer will hold more than you could fit on a bike rack anyway, and if you're using the bike to commute you can just wear a backpack (being aware that this will make you sweatier and a little less comfy in summer heat).

Depending on how much you weigh, tires can be a really big deal.  I'm 200 lbs, and find 28mm tires are a little uncomfortable under my ass on any rides over two hours - especially when on bumpy roads (fire roads/semi-paved stuff/lots of potholes).  A 32 or 35mm tire is just way more comfortable, and tends to give better grip on loose/slippery stuff.  They also tend to flat less often because they're not filled to such high pressures - so added bonus.

Le Poisson

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2021, 10:27:20 AM »
Most trailers usually connect to the bike through the rear axle quick release, so you probably shouldn't have problems with that.

At his budget the OP likey won't encounter Thru-Axles, but if he does, the Roberts Axle project will get him up and running:
https://robertaxleproject.com/cargo-child-trailers/

I will re-iterate though, avoid the clamp-on trailer connections if you can. If the trailer connects with one of these gizmos, walk away.

Janissary

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2021, 10:37:43 AM »
Reading all the comments was helpful. I am leaning towards a hybrid bike at this point and my next challenge will be narrowing down on brands and models that would possibly fall in my price range.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2021, 11:31:22 AM by Janissary »

Janissary

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #13 on: March 08, 2021, 10:42:13 AM »
One other question/concern... how old is your daughter, and have you ever towed her before? Before spending on a bike and trailer, you may want to test run the route on a borrowed setup. Pre-ride the route with her in the trailer and a friend she trusts for company on a quiet morning (usually a Sunday). If she is uncomfortable, your friend can suggest tweaks. If there are route ideas your friend has for sidestreets or trails, you may get tips from them as well. Ideally this person would be the daycare provider or a family friend who is good with kids, but it rarely is... often it's another dude from a cycling club or something.

In my Town, there is a staff in Town hall who will co-ride with new cycle commuters on their first day.

She is almost two years old. We don't have the chance to borrow a setup but we will probably do a dry run with my wife following us. I am not too concerned about the adjustment period as the distance is only 1 mile and there is a huge sidewalk that nobody is on in the early mornings which means we wouldn't even have to be on the road until we both are comfortable.
« Last Edit: March 08, 2021, 11:30:48 AM by Janissary »

dogboyslim

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #14 on: March 08, 2021, 11:16:12 AM »
I'd echo the hybrid setup likely being more comfortable, but if this is a mile with no real hills, it really doesn't matter.

Most trailers I've seen work by having a hitch point that is compressed onto the bike with a longer skewer.

Trailer brands that I've used and like are Burley and Chariot, but both of those are likely to be spendy.  I still have my chariot single that i purchased when my 16 year old was 2.  She doesn't fit anymore, but it works well for groceries and camping good.  Plus, I feel I get more respect from cars on the road when i have that behind me.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2021, 11:38:57 AM »
Just to be contrarian, after years of riding road bikes I find hybrid bikes to be much less comfortable.  I'm happy to spend 6+ hours on my road bike.  Never found a hybrid that was even close to that level of comfort.

Drop bars are far more comfortable as well as being more efficient.

robartsd

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2021, 03:25:20 PM »
Finding the right bike should be primarily about finding one in good working order that fits you well.

Many bikes with kickstands have really lousy kickstands that you might want to replace anyway. I'd probably want to add a good two leg kick stand to maximize stability for loading the trailer.

My riding has all been on a mountain bike (now outfitted more like a hybrid with 1.5" smooth tires) with flat bars. I've only recently gotten into doing longer rides and can echo that this type of set up might be fine for rides <20 miles, but is not great for much further.

My next bike will either be a touring bike (more useful for long solo rides) or an electric cargo bike (more useful for errand running, wife could ride this when we go for rides together).

six-car-habit

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #17 on: March 10, 2021, 02:26:07 AM »
  Here's a link with a few methods [ mostly pretty easy ] of figuring out the frame size you want to get , based on the size of your body, it accounts for different styles of bicycles as well.   --- https://www.bicycle-guider.com/bike-articles/bike-size-chart/ ---             We used it recently when our family went shopping for used bicycles we saw on craigslist, or were in stock at the local bicycle shops - before we made the trip to see and ride the bicycle, it made sense to know if the bicycles overall size was in the realm of what we needed...
   If you comb thru your local craigslist or similar site, you'll find some ads that are more detailed than others and will list the frame size.
 No sense going to see a bike that you cannot step over the top horizontal tube, or the opposite -are scrunched up riding it ' cause its too small.

  We ended up buying 2 used mountain bikes -a late 90's era, and a 2000's era, from a local bike shop. We test rode them first. Everything was in good working order - shifting / brakes / tires / good but not perfect paint. They came with a 1 yr warranty , and included 1 future tune-up. One has brand new tires.  They sold lots of higher end new bikes as well, but took in nice units as trade-ins which they would go thru and sell used . They are "good mid level, when originally sold" bike, probably approx $500 each +/-  when new.  We paid $220+$180.

  The other we bought off a craigslist  guy who is a hobbyist. He had a few bikes listed, all which looked to be in nice shape, with a good description,  and decent pricing.   His happened to be more of a hybrid mountain / cruiser , which was better for the intended usage [ more pavement, but capable on some packed gravel trails ] . Better for my wife. Only 7 speeds. 1 shifter mechanism . Which is what she wanted. A couple small scratches but otherwise presents and rides as new. Paid $160 , it's a 2011 model that sold for about $400 new.

    - edit to add. I saw you mentioned growing up with a cheap mtn bike.  I think you'll much prefer spending <$400 on a nicely built, with good components - a  lighter used bike, whether mtn / hybrid/ cruiser/ road bike/ or whatever. --- A new $200 K-mart mountain bike has the cheapest parts.  The box store retailers know cheap bikes likely will go less than 75 miles from store shelf to scrapheap. The only "name brand" component i can find on my former $200 cheaply built ride, is a derailer by Shimano  [ only 1 out of the 2 on the rig ! , + probably the cheapest type of the many styles they make, that they're willing to sell in bulk]

 
« Last Edit: March 10, 2021, 03:02:43 AM by six-car-habit »

Janissary

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2021, 01:50:21 PM »
  Here's a link with a few methods [ mostly pretty easy ] of figuring out the frame size you want to get , based on the size of your body, it accounts for different styles of bicycles as well.   --- https://www.bicycle-guider.com/bike-articles/bike-size-chart/ ---             We used it recently when our family went shopping for used bicycles we saw on craigslist, or were in stock at the local bicycle shops - before we made the trip to see and ride the bicycle, it made sense to know if the bicycles overall size was in the realm of what we needed...
   If you comb thru your local craigslist or similar site, you'll find some ads that are more detailed than others and will list the frame size.
 No sense going to see a bike that you cannot step over the top horizontal tube, or the opposite -are scrunched up riding it ' cause its too small.

  We ended up buying 2 used mountain bikes -a late 90's era, and a 2000's era, from a local bike shop. We test rode them first. Everything was in good working order - shifting / brakes / tires / good but not perfect paint. They came with a 1 yr warranty , and included 1 future tune-up. One has brand new tires.  They sold lots of higher end new bikes as well, but took in nice units as trade-ins which they would go thru and sell used . They are "good mid level, when originally sold" bike, probably approx $500 each +/-  when new.  We paid $220+$180.

  The other we bought off a craigslist  guy who is a hobbyist. He had a few bikes listed, all which looked to be in nice shape, with a good description,  and decent pricing.   His happened to be more of a hybrid mountain / cruiser , which was better for the intended usage [ more pavement, but capable on some packed gravel trails ] . Better for my wife. Only 7 speeds. 1 shifter mechanism . Which is what she wanted. A couple small scratches but otherwise presents and rides as new. Paid $160 , it's a 2011 model that sold for about $400 new.

    - edit to add. I saw you mentioned growing up with a cheap mtn bike.  I think you'll much prefer spending <$400 on a nicely built, with good components - a  lighter used bike, whether mtn / hybrid/ cruiser/ road bike/ or whatever. --- A new $200 K-mart mountain bike has the cheapest parts.  The box store retailers know cheap bikes likely will go less than 75 miles from store shelf to scrapheap. The only "name brand" component i can find on my former $200 cheaply built ride, is a derailer by Shimano  [ only 1 out of the 2 on the rig ! , + probably the cheapest type of the many styles they make, that they're willing to sell in bulk]

 

This is great information. I also prefer going with a good quality used bike but I could not find any near me in the last two weeks on Craigslist or Ebay. I have also visited 3 bike shops but none of them sell bikes. Apparently they are "sending" the trade ins to "somewhere" and if someone happens to trade in a good bike it is usually sold the same day. Probably to someone who the owner knows.

One of the bike shop employee was very helpful and generous with information and they happen to sell the following bike:
https://toposoutdoor.com/products/marin-fairfax-1-commuter-bike-2021?variant=32563653673050&CAWELAID=120089080000018848&CATARGETID=120089080000017831&CADevice=c&gclid=CjwKCAiA4rGCBhAQEiwAelVti3SmgcPsnrkCUu8ilvqzMK1iCMJwIlCyFvdtXzTtXqnYJZ_1OGz14BoCer8QAvD_BwE

I am leaning towards spending more than I was planning but get a bike that I think is good quality. However, I have never heard of the Marin brand before. Is it a good brand? I will still keep an eye on classifieds just in case in the mean time.

As for the trailer, I am planning to buy one of the best sellers off of Amazon and go from there.

six-car-habit

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #19 on: March 14, 2021, 03:33:33 AM »
 It looks like the Marin brand has mainly positive reviews from the quick searching i did and they've been around for 30+ years - and the Fairfax looks like it should satisfy your requirements.   I'd note that the toposoutdoor-dot-com site does have a disclaimer for their warranty stating a receipt from a bike shop for "intitial setup" would be required if you had a warranty claim, and although they offer free shipping there seemes to be an ' oversized' charge of $60.

   Since a person can't really buy cross state lines / thru internet and save money on taxes like we were able to years ago -- it might be worthwhile to pay a bit more at 'retail local bike shop' prices which most likely includes the set-up fee.  Rather than paying less+shipping cost+ time and travel + cost to get it set-up at a bike shop to protect warranty [ and ensure smooth initial braking and shifting].

  A kayak place i dealt with last fall also carries bikes { new units only } , and the owner said he had a Huge backlog of bicycles ordered, and way more people wanting bikes than most years. More orders than usual and more delays than usual due to Covid.

  The Craigslist guy we bought the 7 speed from told me, he was having trouble finding bikes worthy of trying to "fix and flip" , and had bought several over the summer, just to break them up/ dissasemble them   -- to get certain parts he needed.

  Spring is here, you may decide to pay a few hundred more $ to ride a new one tommorow, or wait a few weeks {months?} until an appropriate model / Size turns up on craigslist / FB marketplace and pay only $300 +/- .     The Marin brand and so many other brands offer many bikes at $900 / $1500 / $2000+ etc ,   that  -- if you use it a lot - - you shouldn't feel horrible paying $600 all-in for a new bicycle. My thoughts anyhow.

BlueMR2

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #20 on: March 14, 2021, 12:59:44 PM »
Downsides to the drop bars are that you won't have the leverage you are used to with flat bars and it'll be a bit more unstable.  Nothing you can't get over with some practice, but be careful at first.  Also, you'll find new muscles in your neck on the first long ride that you didn't even know you had!  :)

Janissary

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #21 on: March 18, 2021, 01:56:33 PM »
Thank you all for your help. I got lucky and found a used 2017 Giant Sedona DX for $250 after negotiating. Had to drive round trip 50 miles but it took only 1.5 hours door to door so no complaints. Looks like they have not used the bike at all and it was sitting indoors, and it came with the phone holder.


image host website

Now, I need to find a used trailer.


turketron

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #22 on: March 18, 2021, 02:31:39 PM »
I will re-iterate though, avoid the clamp-on trailer connections if you can. If the trailer connects with one of these gizmos, walk away.

These connectors are definitely garbage, but if you the trailer is otherwise in good shape but has his connector you may be able to remove it. I got a trailer off craigslist that had one of these and I just took off the bolts connecting it to the arm and connected the arm directly to one of these. Total cost was like $30 for the trailer and $25 for two of the connectors (for my bike and my wife's).

ChpBstrd

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #23 on: March 18, 2021, 02:48:15 PM »
Thank you all for your help. I got lucky and found a used 2017 Giant Sedona DX for $250 after negotiating. Had to drive round trip 50 miles but it took only 1.5 hours door to door so no complaints. Looks like they have not used the bike at all and it was sitting indoors, and it came with the phone holder.


image host website

Now, I need to find a used trailer.

That looks like the right tool for the job. I'm sure it has lower gearing than the road bike, which was my main concern if your plan is to pull a trailer up hills.

I did notice though, that the frame size seems a lot bigger than the road bike initially pictured. Does it fit? is question #1 when buying any bike. Bikes are more like a prosthetic than a car.

I had a bike trailer from Academy for a while similar to this one. They say the weight is only 23.7lbs. A single-child trailer will catch a lot less wind though. Watch Craigslist or Facebook marketplace for used deals.

https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/schwinn-gemini-double-bicycle-trailer?gmc_feed=t&campid=71700000050043540&adgroupid=58700004906101382&device=c&keyword=92700057347135587&Channel=pla&gclid=CjwKCAjw9MuCBhBUEiwAbDZ-7hRazNYDcjrnwDFPaoNhRJ_ceUyFXve2uIbuQ7u7BaDyKY2SIME_HhoCCVQQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds


Janissary

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #24 on: March 18, 2021, 02:59:42 PM »
You are absolutely right. I had no idea the road bike had a smaller frame size when I first came across it and couldn't judge it from the picture. The bike I ended up buying is the right size for me, and the handle can also be adjusted which is a plus for finding a comfortable upright riding position. 

robartsd

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #25 on: March 18, 2021, 05:45:28 PM »
That looks like a solid deal. Adjustable stem certainly makes varying the fit a bit easier. Have fun on your new bike.

FLBiker

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #26 on: March 19, 2021, 09:37:41 AM »
Nice one!  My first "real" bike was a Giant and I really liked it.  It worked great as a commuter.

Le Poisson

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Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #27 on: March 19, 2021, 10:33:29 AM »
Great job! Hope it all works for you!

Janissary

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
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  • Posts: 15
Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #28 on: March 28, 2021, 01:38:42 PM »
I've ended up buying an Allen trailer from Amazon for $120 bringing the total to $370 with the bike. I was able to stay below the budget and practically have a brand new setup.

This is the Final setup. Made its maiden voyage successfully. Thank you all for the help.
« Last Edit: March 28, 2021, 01:41:28 PM by Janissary »

Le Poisson

  • Senior Mustachian
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  • Posts: 14574
Re: Bike reccomendation
« Reply #29 on: March 29, 2021, 09:00:32 AM »
Looks great! You're taking me back to when my boys were tiny and I pulled them around town!