Author Topic: Bike-pinion  (Read 5419 times)

Guses

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Bike-pinion
« on: January 29, 2016, 05:56:18 AM »
In my eternal quest for getting the best winter bike solution, I came across and ad selling 3 bikes for fairly cheap. Can a mustachian help me identify these bikes and help me determine if they would be any good for commuting on? 

These are the bikes, seller is asking 80$ for all 3:


GuitarStv

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2016, 06:24:23 AM »
Ugh.


Well, you know that they haven't been cared for properly based on the picture.

That means you have to go over every component to see if they're functioning properly, you have to thoroughly check the frames for rust/cracks/alignment (be very leery about bent derailleur hangars the way the bikes have just been tossed there).  You'll have to take apart the headsets and wheel bearings to determine if they're too rusted to use or not, and possibly replace them.  Spin the cranks around a couple times to see if the bottom brackets are shot (might need to be replaced).  Cables and cable housing will all need to be replaced.  The brakes will need to be removed and the pivots checked/regreased.  Chain is likely toast.  I don't see QR skewers on those wheels, so you'll need to budget for some of them.  Check the wheels for trueness, and see if the spokes are in good shape.  Check the cassette and chainrings for wear.  Check the tires for any visible cracking or signs of bulging, if you see that they need to be replaced.  You'll have to make sure that the seatpost isn't fused into position, the pedals aren't fused into position, all the screws going into the frame aren't fused into position . . . then we can worry about whether or not any of the bike frames are the right size to fit you.

The red frame looks like an old peugot, which means everything will be weird and French sized, so replacement parts are a PITA.  I don't know about the other two.  Does the wheel set fit all three frames?

It's doable, but without an awful lot of legwork and confidence repairing bicycles it might be tough to get a working bike out of that mess for cheap.

bobechs

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2016, 07:58:41 AM »
On the other hand, you can tell by the picture alone that they are used to being out in the cold & snow.

Retire-Canada

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2016, 08:16:36 AM »
In my eternal quest for getting the best winter bike solution,

I wouldn't buy any of those.

Can you describe what "best" means for you in this context?

I would find a low cost used mountain bike that fits you.

- install some wide knobby tires if it doesn't have them already [possibly studded if you deal with a lot of ice]
- install some fenders [you can DIY if you like]
- install a rear rack to carry your stuff
- install a rear and front light
- install a bell if that's useful and possibly req'd by your local by-laws
- stay on top of the maintenance both for your safety and so you don't break down at an inopportune time

Jack

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2016, 08:33:40 AM »
I wouldn't buy any of those.

...

I would find a low cost used mountain bike that fits you.

The Jamis (the green and white one) is a mountain bike. You can tell by the fact that it's got a
suspension fork.



So, the good news is that all three bikes in the picture -- a Jamis, a Raleigh, and (if GuitarStv is correct) a Peugeot -- are decent-quality "bike-shop" bikes, not department store "bicycle-shaped objects." The bad news is, that's about all they have going for them.

The red and black frames are likely to be 700c wheels and the mountain bike is likely to be 26", so I would expect that wheelset to fit one or two of the bikes, but not all three (and it would only even fit two if the Pugeot and Raleigh both have friction rear derailleurs, or the same number of gears if they're indexed -- but they look pretty old, so that might be likely).

At the minimum, they're all going to have to be completely disassembled and rebuilt, and you're very likely going to have to replace a bunch of parts. There might be enough non-rusted, compatible parts to assemble a working bike, but I wouldn't count on it.

If you're looking for a project and you have a basement or somewhere to store these in, offering the guy maybe $40 max (unless they've only been outside for a couple of days and aren't rusty yet) might be a good deal. But only if you want bike rebuilding to be your new hobby.

Guses

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2016, 08:48:27 AM »
Thanks for all the feedback.

To give a little context, I already have a Trek 2000 MTB (currently out of commission) and a BSO Fat bike that I bought this year.

I am likely going to be selling the fat bike at the end of the season because it does not really accomplish what I wanted it to accomplish (plow through deep snow). I am currently commuting with it but it is really heavy and I am doing only plowed backstreets (and a little bit of sidewalk next to a fast road).

I am either going to gear up the Trek for winter commuting (running slicks presently) and get a lighter bike for the rest of the year or get a lighter bike for winter commuting and keep the trek as is (it's not super light but I like it).

Although I am able to do all the maintenance and repairs listed above, I don't really want a new project right now.

Thing is, I am not really knowledgeable of what is a good versus bad bike in the used market.

0$-200$ is my range.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2016, 08:59:57 AM »
The key to keeping your winter bike in good shape is just maintenance and cleaning.  Every time it's wet/salty (or once a week if it has been pretty dry) do the following:

Spray some WD-40 on the chain and cassette.  Take a bucket of water (with a drop of soap in it) and sponge to rinse off the derailleurs, the frame, brakes, and other gunky stuff, finishing by washing off the chain and cassette.  Then bounce the bike a couple times to get the water off, lube the chain and brake pivots and you're good.

I can get this finished in about five minutes now.

This way you can ride a nicer bike year round without ruining it.

Jack

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #7 on: January 29, 2016, 10:17:46 AM »
I am likely going to be selling the fat bike at the end of the season because it does not really accomplish what I wanted it to accomplish (plow through deep snow).

I've never ridden on snow, but it seems to me that if the goal is to plow through deep snow (as opposed to floating on top of it), then what you'd want is a narrow tire, not a wide one.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #8 on: January 29, 2016, 10:29:38 AM »
I like narrow tires for getting through slush and snow on hard road beneath.  If you're riding off road through several feet of unplowed snow (or lots of loose sand . . . like Lawrence of Arabia style) the fat bike might start making sense.

Guses

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #9 on: January 29, 2016, 11:23:22 AM »
I was actually attempting to float on top of the snow but what actually happens is that the back wheel spins freely, I lose momentum and I get stuck.


Jack

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #10 on: January 29, 2016, 11:29:00 AM »
I was actually attempting to float on top of the snow but what actually happens is that the back wheel spins freely, I lose momentum and I get stuck.

In that case, more aggressive tread would be called-for. (But my completely uninformed intuition is that cutting through with a narrow tire -- ideally, with studs -- would still be better.)

Rollin

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #11 on: January 29, 2016, 11:44:54 AM »
In my eternal quest for getting the best winter bike solution, I came across and ad selling 3 bikes for fairly cheap. Can a mustachian help me identify these bikes and help me determine if they would be any good for commuting on? 

These are the bikes, seller is asking 80$ for all 3:

I would be concerned about them being stolen merchandise.  I can't see someone taking the wheels off that blue/grey bike (decent quality) and throwing it outside.  Then, to sell for $80 (if it is in decent shape) just ads to my suspicion.

Guses

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #12 on: January 29, 2016, 11:47:48 AM »
I was actually attempting to float on top of the snow but what actually happens is that the back wheel spins freely, I lose momentum and I get stuck.

In that case, more aggressive tread would be called-for. (But my completely uninformed intuition is that cutting through with a narrow tire -- ideally, with studs -- would still be better.)

Yes, that's why I am looking at road bikes/hybrids and getting rid of the fat bike.

TrMama

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #13 on: January 29, 2016, 11:59:07 AM »
The key to keeping your winter bike in good shape is just maintenance and cleaning.  Every time it's wet/salty (or once a week if it has been pretty dry) do the following:

Spray some WD-40 on the chain and cassette.  Take a bucket of water (with a drop of soap in it) and sponge to rinse off the derailleurs, the frame, brakes, and other gunky stuff, finishing by washing off the chain and cassette.  Then bounce the bike a couple times to get the water off, lube the chain and brake pivots and you're good.

I can get this finished in about five minutes now.

This way you can ride a nicer bike year round without ruining it.

This is what I do. I ride my fancy pants carbon road bike through our wet, gritty PNW winters. I originally bought it when I was thinking about racing. It's not worth any more than a decent new commuter, so it doesn't really make financial sense to sell it. Plus, I freaking love riding it.

The frame is super light and can't rust. Then I make sure to clean and lube the drive train carefully, plus wipe down the rims and check the brake pads for wear and grit. This only takes 15 min/week. You're going to have to do this work regardless of what kind of bike you get.

In my neck of the woods, the best deals on bikes are found at local bike shops that carry new and used bikes. The used ones have been made rideable by the shop, plus they'll probably throw in a fit or some maintenance too. Call around and ask them to call you when they get something in that will work for you.

Guses

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #14 on: January 29, 2016, 12:19:20 PM »
Yeah, but I don't know what I am looking for... Any concrete suggestions?

robartsd

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #15 on: January 29, 2016, 12:22:06 PM »
Those bikes are projects and/or stolen proerty. If I did wanted them for a project, I'd probably offer $25 for the lot unless closer inspection makes me suspect that none of the frames are usable. If I wanted to help catch bike theifs, I might look at them and take a good description (including serial number found on bottom bracket shell) to the local police. Most likely I'd just stay away from this offer.

robartsd

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #16 on: January 29, 2016, 12:25:11 PM »
You're looking for good fit on a fucntional bike from a consumer sucka cleaning out their garage. The suggestion of finding a used bike at a new/used bike shop won't save you nearly as much money, but mitigates most of the risks with buying a used bike. The shop should help you select the best bike they have for your needs (if they're really good, the'll be honest with you if they don't have anything suitable).

Le Poisson

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #17 on: January 29, 2016, 12:33:08 PM »
I wonder if the replies would be the same if that ad were up in April after the snow had melted and everyone was none the wiser. Since the bikes are in Ottawa, its easy to call the police and just ask if they have had a Jamis Coda, a Peugot, or a Raleigh reported stolen lately. Likely the cops wouldn't know/care, but it would clear your conscience a little.

Between the three bikes, you may have parts to assemble one. But I doubt it. Then you are out of pocket for the extra parts, and parts are more expensive than whole bikes.

I agree with the comments above though, just walk away.

GuitarStv

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #18 on: January 29, 2016, 12:45:40 PM »
I was actually attempting to float on top of the snow but what actually happens is that the back wheel spins freely, I lose momentum and I get stuck.

In that case, more aggressive tread would be called-for. (But my completely uninformed intuition is that cutting through with a narrow tire -- ideally, with studs -- would still be better.)

Studs only help on ice.  You want chunky tread in deep snow.  Me, I get along fine during the winter with minimal tread on a 28 or 32 mm tire.

Guses

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #19 on: January 29, 2016, 01:06:47 PM »
Maybe I am na´ve, but it seems particularly stupid to sell stolen bikes in bulk on the internet. I am guessing it's just a person cleaning their garage/backyard. They all seem to be the same sized frame too.

Besides, it's not a "too good to be true" deal, there are a bunch of 25-50$ bikes listed on my local site.

 

robartsd

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #20 on: January 29, 2016, 01:56:09 PM »
Maybe I am na´ve, but it seems particularly stupid to sell stolen bikes in bulk on the internet. I am guessing it's just a person cleaning their garage/backyard. They all seem to be the same sized frame too.

Besides, it's not a "too good to be true" deal, there are a bunch of 25-50$ bikes listed on my local site.
It is even possible that these just came out of the garage or shed just to take a picture without all of the seller's other junk in the background.

Rollin

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #21 on: January 30, 2016, 08:31:31 PM »
You're looking for good fit on a fucntional bike from a consumer sucka cleaning out their garage. The suggestion of finding a used bike at a new/used bike shop won't save you nearly as much money, but mitigates most of the risks with buying a used bike. The shop should help you select the best bike they have for your needs (if they're really good, the'll be honest with you if they don't have anything suitable).

For sure, and add to that any aftermarket parts are going to add up very fast.  I had a friend purchase a $25 bike that needed a new seat.  The seat cost $30!

Retire-Canada

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #22 on: January 31, 2016, 08:12:27 AM »
The Jamis (the green and white one) is a mountain bike. You can tell by the fact that it's got a
suspension fork.

It's a frame and fork with a few parts hung off it. A bike is something you can actually pedal.

Would I buy some mountain bike parts stored in a snowbank? No.

Even if you just wanted some parts to build up a bike you can do better than that from CL. I'd start with parts not stored in a snowbank. And bikes that are sized for me which should be something the ad states along with what sort of bikes they are.
« Last Edit: January 31, 2016, 08:20:03 AM by Retire-Canada »

Retire-Canada

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Re: Bike-pinion
« Reply #23 on: January 31, 2016, 08:17:55 AM »
I was actually attempting to float on top of the snow but what actually happens is that the back wheel spins freely, I lose momentum and I get stuck.

If you haven't already done so get some advice on a dedicated fatbike forum:

http://forums.mtbr.com/fat-bikes/

Riding on deep snow requires very low pressures [1-4psi].