Author Topic: bicycle rack and panniers  (Read 564 times)

MatthewK

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bicycle rack and panniers
« on: August 26, 2018, 09:27:55 AM »
Ok cycling mustachians....I don't commute but will quite often ride up to the market/library for a few items, produce, granola bars, 6 pack,etc. Things I can easily fit in my backpack. Looking to avoid the sweaty back syndrome in this mid-Michigan humidity. I'm looking for a not too fancy rack and pannier solution to give a try. Ideally something that will collapse when not in use and a bag that removes quickly to take in and out of the store. If it helps, I ride a Giant Escape hybrid for reference. Thanks

GuitarStv

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Re: bicycle rack and panniers
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2018, 03:54:04 PM »
The Giant Escape should fit just about any standard rack, but I've had an Axiom Journey on the back of mine for about seven years with no complaints.  It's rated for carrying more than 100 lbs:

https://www.amazon.com/Axiom-Journey-Cycle-Rack-Black/dp/B0025ULKGG/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1535406105&sr=1-2&keywords=axiom+rear+rack

As far as actually holding stuff, how fancy do you want to get?
- You can lash/velcro/bungee a lunch bag type of setup on top of your rack if you don't often carry much (or go with the 'designed for bike' type version - https://www.blackburndesign.com/en_ca/bags/trunk-bags.html).
- You can lash/velcro/bungee a milk crate to the rack and your backpack can go in there.  Works pretty well, but be aware that a milk crate up high that's filled with heavy stuff can throw your balance off a bit while cycling slowly.
- You can build your own kitty litter panniers (https://www.crazyguyonabike.com/doc/?doc_id=1841)
- You can buy purpose built panniers (https://www.amazon.com/Ibera-Bicycle-Quick-Release-Weather-Panniers/dp/B00KW2ZIMQ/ref=sr_1_3?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1535406729&sr=1-3&keywords=pannier  note - double check for hook compatibility with the tubing size on whatever rack you buy).  Panniers are great for carrying clothing and soft stuff, sometimes they're shaped in a way that makes fitting in heavy square things like books a bit awkward.
- You can buy a backpack that's also a pannier (https://www.amazon.com/Blackburn-Wayside-Backpack-Pannier-Canvas/dp/B0141JBYEG/ref=sr_1_8?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1535406648&sr=1-8&keywords=pannier+backpack)
- You can attach heavy duty folding baskets to carry several bags of groceries and books (http://www.waldsports.com/index.cfm/store/rear-baskets/582-rear-folding-basket/).  These are great for heavy stuff, but do weigh your bike down all the time.
« Last Edit: August 27, 2018, 03:59:45 PM by GuitarStv »

mm1970

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Re: bicycle rack and panniers
« Reply #2 on: August 28, 2018, 01:01:45 PM »
I'm a dinosaur, and I bought my rack and bike bags back when this company was actually in town!  20 years ago!

I have this rack:

https://www.jandd.com/detail.asp?PRODUCT_ID=FRSTD

And whatever bags fit with it.

cl_noll

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Re: bicycle rack and panniers
« Reply #3 on: August 29, 2018, 08:39:06 AM »
whatever you do, spend the extra $10 for a rack that has an extra bar on the side, along the lines of what GuitarStv suggested. I DO NOT recommend the basic racks that only have two bars on the side in the shape of a downward-pointing triangle.

The reason being is that this design allows a heavy pannier to wobble and sway at the bottom, and potentially collide with your spokes and bend/break them, which you definitely do not want.