Author Topic: BEANS!  (Read 7553 times)

BlueHouse

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BEANS!
« on: June 01, 2017, 08:05:54 AM »
Let me begin by saying that I'm an unenthusiastic cook, but that I am trying to reduce grocery bills and dining-out bills by cooking more at home.  I like the idea of batch cooking and slow cookers, and I have a couple of recipes that are easy, tasty, freeze and lunchbox-worthy.   Right now, I really want to improve the basic ingredients that go into some of my favorite recipes.  And that means beans.

I bought an InstantPot last year in the hopes that I could make beans from dry, but so far, it's been a complete failure.  I've followed recipes on just about every cooking blog to make beans in slow cookers and pressure cookers and they come out either too hard or too soft.   

Does anyone have an exact instruction manual for how to make Black Beans from dry?  I swear I can follow instructions, but maybe there is something simple I've overlooked.  I inspected the bean packaging at the supermarket the other day and noticed that the Harris Teeter beans had a "best by" date, but the Goya beans did not.  How can I tell if I have old beans? 

If I can get one type of bean right, I'll expand into other types. 

thanks for the help.

Bird In Hand

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #1 on: June 01, 2017, 09:45:51 AM »
Does anyone have an exact instruction manual for how to make Black Beans from dry?  I swear I can follow instructions, but maybe there is something simple I've overlooked.  I inspected the bean packaging at the supermarket the other day and noticed that the Harris Teeter beans had a "best by" date, but the Goya beans did not.  How can I tell if I have old beans? 

Hmm, I've never had trouble with black beans, and I've cooked some very old bags of Goya brand.  I typically soak overnight and rinse the water thoroughly (contrary to Goya's advice about rinsing).  Then I submerge the beans in water, bring to a boil, reduce to lightly simmering while covered, and keep cooking until they're ready.  Sometimes I add salt, sometimes I don't.  I don't even pay much attention to how long it cooks.  I think I check after an hour or so, and then periodically after that until they're ready.

lifeanon269

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #2 on: June 01, 2017, 10:05:29 AM »
As Bird In Hand said, soaking the beans overnight in water is one of the keys to cooking beans properly. If you don't soak them, they usually either come out too hard or too soft depending on how long you cooked them. The reason being is if they're not soaked, then the outsides cook too much while the insides haven't cooked enough, or if you cook them long enough to cook the insides, then the outsides cooked too much which makes them fall apart and too mushy. Soaking them first allows them to soften up which means they don't need to cook as long. That will help prevent you from overcooking the outsides while still making the insides soft enough to eat. Just put them in a bowl of water and leave them for at least 8-12 hours. To retain some of the nutrients/flavor, use the soaking water as some of the water that you boil them in.

That's really all there is too it. I doubt it has anything to do with the beans you're buying.

Khaetra

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #3 on: June 01, 2017, 10:06:03 AM »
How I cook beans:

Put dried beans in a large pot, fill pot with water (not quite to the top though!) and turn the burner on high.  When they start to boil, set the timer for 8 minutes and let them boil to their hearts content.  When the timer goes off, turn off the heat (if you use electric move the pot to a different burner), DO NOT DRAIN THEM and set the timer for one hour (let them sit in the hot water).  When the timer goes off, drain them, then return them to the pot, cover 'em with water and bring it up to a boil.  Turn the heat down just a bit and cook them 'til they're done.

oldladystache

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #4 on: June 01, 2017, 10:17:35 AM »
I boil them for a few minutes, leave them to cool a bit then put them in the refrigerator to soak overnight. Next day I again boil them a few minutes and return them to the refrigerator until I'm ready to use them. They just need 15 to 20 minutes cooking after that.

boarder42

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #5 on: June 01, 2017, 10:20:54 AM »
just follow the instant pot instructions no soaking needed beans in 45 minutes.

Duchess of Stratosphear

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2017, 10:35:17 AM »
I soak them for at least four hours (more is better for black beans, it seems) and then pressure cook them for 10-ish minutes.

Beans are a great way to eat healthy food on the cheap. It took me many years to figure out how to do this and to remember to plan ahead enough to do it. For me, the pressure cooker has been key. As long as you remember to start soaking them in the morning, you can have beans in a few minutes after you get home.

boarder42

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #7 on: June 01, 2017, 10:52:59 AM »
I soak them for at least four hours (more is better for black beans, it seems) and then pressure cook them for 10-ish minutes.

Beans are a great way to eat healthy food on the cheap. It took me many years to figure out how to do this and to remember to plan ahead enough to do it. For me, the pressure cooker has been key. As long as you remember to start soaking them in the morning, you can have beans in a few minutes after you get home.

with an instant pot no soaking is necessary also no plannning.

Sailor Sam

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #8 on: June 01, 2017, 10:57:37 AM »
I also struggled with making soft beans when I first switched to the instapot. For me, the fix was to add much more water than the recipes called for.

Before that tweak, I found the beans came out looking apropriatly liquid-y, but we're hard. I think the water level fell below the top layers of beans, and they couldn't soak up enough water to really cool.

Abooki

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #9 on: June 01, 2017, 11:10:32 AM »
I love beans!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I suggest getting the dried beans (I love pinto and kidney beans). And do some prep work on the weekend- I soak my beans like on Friday night and then boil them on Saturday. Portion them out in zip locks or Tupperware and freeze those portions.  Here is my bean recipe when I unfreeze those portions.

beans
tomatoes - canned or fresh.And tomato paste for thickening. I would say half a can per 2 cups of beans and 1 table spoon of tomato paste
spices: cumin 2 tea spoon , turmeric 2 tea spoons , chili powder(use as your taste buds can allow or skip), curry 2 tea spoons (I prefer madras curry but any can work), salt and pepper
green pepper diced or can be optional
onions - may be like a quarter an onion
garlic fresh may be two cloves or less
GHEE. very important.  Can get at your local African or Indian store
Cooking time
pan on stove on medium and then add the ghee with the spices, garlic onions and tomatoes and tomato paste and green pepper. Use a wooden spoon or what you have to mix and kinda smash it to make like a purée as everything cooks
when you have created this purée add the beans( just the beans with no bean sauce( that water that your y get when you cook or have bean from cans). Mix mix mix. Looking good
add the bean sauce( the ones you get from when you boiled your beans or the one from the can if using canned beans). You can add water to get desire thickness
serve with some basmati rice or I have eaten the beans with chapatis or potatoes or what Americans call yams, or just buy themselves
Forgive me that I don't have many measurements. I was taught by my grandma and Mum to cook with my eyes.


Let me know if you try it.

thegardener

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #10 on: June 01, 2017, 11:27:51 AM »
I cook my beans in a slow cooker. I think the instant pot should have this function. I add about a cup of beans for two cups of liquid and cook on low for 6-8 hours. They generally have a softer texture than canned beans when cooked for this long, but you can shorten the time for a firmer texture.

moof

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #11 on: June 01, 2017, 12:11:29 PM »
Slightly off your question, but after I got my beans figured out I moved on to rice to go with them.

I love Trader Joe's frozen brown rice, but it is rather pricey at about a buck for just over a cup of cooked rice per bag.  All my my attempts at brown rice end up with a burned bottom, gloppy middle, and under cooked top.  Then I found out about boiling brown rice.

Simple bullet proof brown rice:
1 part brown, rinsed in cold water (optional).
4+ parts boiling water, anything over a 4:1 ratio is fine, so you can ballpark it easily
1/2 to 1 tsp salt per quart of water, I eyeball this too

Add rice to boiling water, stir once, simmer low partially covered for 25 minutes (a few extra for short grain).
Strain in a mesh colander, serve.

It comes out as good at the Trader Joe's stuff and stores very well in either the fridge or freezer.  You get individual grains that are not mushy.  Goes great with beans, stir fry, or as a dedicated side.

boarder42

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2017, 12:26:49 PM »
I also struggled with making soft beans when I first switched to the instapot. For me, the fix was to add much more water than the recipes called for.

Before that tweak, I found the beans came out looking apropriatly liquid-y, but we're hard. I think the water level fell below the top layers of beans, and they couldn't soak up enough water to really cool.

this is true and a good point.  you need to add more water than they call for to get them right.  i just put a bunch in and end up with extra and strain it . 

Lookilu

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2017, 01:58:30 PM »
I was a bit leery over making beans from dry in my InstantPot, but this recipe comes out perfectly: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2016/03/pressure-cooker-black-bean-soup-andouille-recipe.html
The first time I made it, I let the pot depressurize naturally--since I was skeptical about the beans being finished--but the second time I did the quick release and it was actually much better. Apparently letting the pressure out causes the beans to smash themselves like crazy into the sides of the pot and that adds a lot of body to the soup. So good!

As others have said, make sure to add enough liquid to cover the beans by 2 inches.

I haven't tried this one yet, but the directions and technique look good: http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2015/10/quick-and-easy-pressure-cooker-black-bean-chorizo-recipe.html
« Last Edit: June 01, 2017, 02:01:29 PM by Lookilu »

Louisville

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2017, 02:13:00 PM »
Slightly off your question, but after I got my beans figured out I moved on to rice to go with them.

I love Trader Joe's frozen brown rice, but it is rather pricey at about a buck for just over a cup of cooked rice per bag.  All my my attempts at brown rice end up with a burned bottom, gloppy middle, and under cooked top.  Then I found out about boiling brown rice.

Simple bullet proof brown rice:
1 part brown, rinsed in cold water (optional).
4+ parts boiling water, anything over a 4:1 ratio is fine, so you can ballpark it easily
1/2 to 1 tsp salt per quart of water, I eyeball this too

Add rice to boiling water, stir once, simmer low partially covered for 25 minutes (a few extra for short grain).
Strain in a mesh colander, serve.

It comes out as good at the Trader Joe's stuff and stores very well in either the fridge or freezer.  You get individual grains that are not mushy.  Goes great with beans, stir fry, or as a dedicated side.

Hmm. Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but you're doing it the hard way.

1 part rice (white or brown), 2 parts water, a little salt.
Salt is not optional if you want perfect rice. It's not just for flavor.
Cover snugly. Leave that cover on, limit peeking.
Bring just to a boil, then turn down very low. Wait. When you can tilt the pot over and the water's all been soaked up, it's done. Takes longer for brown than white. Try a heavier pot and a lower heat if the bottom is burning.
If you like the rice to be separate (not stick together), rinse the excess starch off in a colander before starting.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2017, 02:15:19 PM by Louisville »

boarder42

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2017, 02:31:08 PM »
Slightly off your question, but after I got my beans figured out I moved on to rice to go with them.

I love Trader Joe's frozen brown rice, but it is rather pricey at about a buck for just over a cup of cooked rice per bag.  All my my attempts at brown rice end up with a burned bottom, gloppy middle, and under cooked top.  Then I found out about boiling brown rice.

Simple bullet proof brown rice:
1 part brown, rinsed in cold water (optional).
4+ parts boiling water, anything over a 4:1 ratio is fine, so you can ballpark it easily
1/2 to 1 tsp salt per quart of water, I eyeball this too

Add rice to boiling water, stir once, simmer low partially covered for 25 minutes (a few extra for short grain).
Strain in a mesh colander, serve.

It comes out as good at the Trader Joe's stuff and stores very well in either the fridge or freezer.  You get individual grains that are not mushy.  Goes great with beans, stir fry, or as a dedicated side.

Hmm. Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but you're doing it the hard way.

1 part rice (white or brown), 2 parts water, a little salt.
Salt is not optional if you want perfect rice. It's not just for flavor.
Cover snugly. Leave that cover on, limit peeking.
Bring just to a boil, then turn down very low. Wait. When you can tilt the pot over and the water's all been soaked up, it's done. Takes longer for brown than white. Try a heavier pot and a lower heat if the bottom is burning.
If you like the rice to be separate (not stick together), rinse the excess starch off in a colander before starting.

yeah this.  rice is easy

Cranky

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2017, 02:39:13 PM »
I have never added salt to rice, and I cook it at least once/week.

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boarder42

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2017, 02:40:31 PM »
I have never added salt to rice, and I cook it at least once/week.

you dont have to. it doesnt change much.

Raenia

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2017, 02:51:06 PM »
I have a slow cooker, not an instant pot, but this is my recipe:

1c black beans
1c lentils
1c kidney beans
1.5c pinto beans

1Tbl salt
1Tbl pepper
1Tbl garlic powder
1Tbl oregano or italian seasoning (or whatever else you want)

Put all ingredients in the pot, fill with water, and soak overnight.  In the morning, if the beans are no longer covered, add more water as needed.  Cook on high 7-8 hours (longer won't hurt them, but they'll get mushier).  Recipe can be scaled as needed, and the ratio of bean types can be adjusted depending on what you have available.

ChandraNH

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2017, 03:08:20 PM »
Your beans are likely to be old and dry unless you are shopping someplace with significant turnover, such as a Latin market.  I've read articles regarding how old most beans that are sold in this country (the USA) are.
 
That said, soak or don't, it's up to you.  soaking beans does more than just make them soft, it also provides you with valuable bean cooking liquid (rinse beans to wash away dirt, pick through for stones, check any that don't float and then cover with water to soak.  Use that soaking water as part of your water for cooking).

I cook a lot of beans (and very unmustachianish, I buy Rancho Gordo Heirloom beans, which are fresh as heck, beautiful and delicious with nothing more than some salt) and here's what I do when I use the instant pot:

beans to cover with water (or other liquid of your choosing) at least two inches above the beans
a generous amount of olive oil into the water, more than you think you want into the pot with the beans
half an onion, not sliced, diced or cut
stalk or two of celery, broken in half
couple of cloves of garlic

If I were doing this in a regular pot, I might dice and sauté the veggies before adding them to the beans

Cook on high pressure for 20 - 25 minutes.  They are never done enough for me after only 10 minutes, but it depends on the variety I'm using as well.
Quick release pressure or let vent naturally.

Into the finished pot I add Mexican oregano (if I'm heading that way, which I usually am with my beans) and salt.

I eat these plain, with any kind of cheese, topped with diced onion, with avocado...


jane x

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2017, 05:21:06 PM »
I don't soak my beans.  I just wash them well and put in a pot with lots of water and bring to a boil on high heat.  Once they boil I reduce the heat to keep them at a steady boil - not a simmer, a simmer is too low and the beans come out hard.  The lid should have a steam opening or you can tilt the lid slightly to allow the steam to escape.

Every hour or so check the water level and add more if needed and give them a good stir.  When the beans are tender, add salt - more than you think it needs and boil for another 30 mins or more.  If the beans are already the softness you want when you add the salt, just turn off the burner and let them sit on the heat for a while and they will be fine.

I find that most beans take about 3 hrs to cook.  Black beans might take less time than pintos since they are smaller.  Pretty soon you'll find how long your batch takes on your stove.  I would do small batches to work out the kinks.

If you buy the beans stored in the bins at a market with good turnover you'll get a better deal and fresher beans.


redbird

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #22 on: June 01, 2017, 09:41:04 PM »
I recently used this recipe to cook black beans in my Instant Pot. It doesn't need soaking. It turned out GREAT. I'm definitely going to make it again.

I also made red kidney beans in my Instant Pot for chili once (made the beans one day and chili the next). The recipe I used suggested soaking, so I did. I can't remember which recipe I used since I apparently didn't bookmark it, but it turned out fine.

thisisjeopardy

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2017, 12:02:46 PM »
I've been cooking beans for years, it's my main source of protein and fiber. I'll chime in on my own experiences with the soak or not to soak debate:

1. Soaking beans will decrease cooking time
2. Soaking beans will make the texture more even and uniform across all beans
3. Soaking beans will not have any effect on gas; you've probably heard about un-digestible sugars and all that, but if you do the research and read the science, soaking beans really has little to no effect on it.

I've got an electric pressure cooker so I don't need to worry about cooking time. Who has time to babysit a boiling/simmering pot of beans for an hour or more? As for the texture I usually make soups so I don't really care for the uniformity across all (or I'll blend the blends into dips, pastes, or something else) For salads and such, I don't care if the beans aren't perfect.

Sometimes I will soak ahead the night before, usually if a recipe calls for it and I don't feel like to converting the cooking time in the PC to adjust for unsoaked - depending on the recipe.

At the indian and asian grocers where I get beans for half the price anywhere else, I've noticed those can sometimes be really, really old and even cooking in a PC for extra time will be under done so I'll soak those.

thisisjeopardy

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2017, 12:06:38 PM »
I have a slow cooker, not an instant pot, but this is my recipe:

1c black beans
1c lentils
1c kidney beans
1.5c pinto beans

1Tbl salt
1Tbl pepper
1Tbl garlic powder
1Tbl oregano or italian seasoning (or whatever else you want)

Put all ingredients in the pot, fill with water, and soak overnight.  In the morning, if the beans are no longer covered, add more water as needed.  Cook on high 7-8 hours (longer won't hurt them, but they'll get mushier).  Recipe can be scaled as needed, and the ratio of bean types can be adjusted depending on what you have available.

Do you use red kidney beans? I believe you're supposed to boil those for at least 10 minutes to kill a toxin that won't always be zapped by a low and slow crock pot cooking.

Raenia

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2017, 01:04:48 PM »
I have a slow cooker, not an instant pot, but this is my recipe:

1c black beans
1c lentils
1c kidney beans
1.5c pinto beans

1Tbl salt
1Tbl pepper
1Tbl garlic powder
1Tbl oregano or italian seasoning (or whatever else you want)

Put all ingredients in the pot, fill with water, and soak overnight.  In the morning, if the beans are no longer covered, add more water as needed.  Cook on high 7-8 hours (longer won't hurt them, but they'll get mushier).  Recipe can be scaled as needed, and the ratio of bean types can be adjusted depending on what you have available.

Do you use red kidney beans? I believe you're supposed to boil those for at least 10 minutes to kill a toxin that won't always be zapped by a low and slow crock pot cooking.

I never have, though I have heard that.  I inherited the recipe, presumably before people knew about the toxicity.  I've never had a problem, but I expect you could boil them for 10 min first without changing much else.  Or you can substitute the kidneys beans for some other bean.
« Last Edit: June 03, 2017, 02:12:17 PM by Raenia »

GrumpyPenguin

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2017, 09:43:20 AM »
Just chiming in because I started cooking dry black beans in my Instant Pot a week ago too. Funny coincidence.

This worked for me.  I didn't pre-soak at all.  Placing a cup of dry black beans in the instant pot and covering them so that there's 2 inches of water above them, I used the "bean" setting for 30 minutes.  Tasted fine to me. 

CutTheFat

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2017, 11:36:39 AM »
I haven't cooked beans from dry directly in a soup before, but I keep finding recipes that suggest doing this.  Anyone say yay or nay? This is the recipe that I'm looking at https://www.dadcooksdinner.com/pressure-cooker-tuscan-bean-soup/.  I already have my beans soaking!

thisisjeopardy

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2017, 07:33:42 PM »
I haven't cooked beans from dry directly in a soup before, but I keep finding recipes that suggest doing this.  Anyone say yay or nay? This is the recipe that I'm looking at https://www.dadcooksdinner.com/pressure-cooker-tuscan-bean-soup/.  I already have my beans soaking!

We do this twice a week so theres always soup leftovers in the fridge - almost entirely from dried. It actually can taste even better after a day in the fridge for more time for the flavours to meld. Freezes well too.

I have countless dried beans to soup recipes like the one you linked (usually not soaked b/c I'm lazy to do it the night before). Although the formula (for me anyway) is to use the sautee function for the aromatics (2-3 cloves of minced garlic, white/yellow/red onion, celery/carrot if applicable, misc spices of my choosing), dump in another vegetable if applicable (diced potato, broccoli, raw carrots/peppers/celery perhaps), 2 cups of beans (sometimes all the same bean, or  8x .25 cup of different beans) and dump in 8-9 cups of water or veggie stock. The possibilities are endless.

Overcooking wont turn anything into a disaster but could lead to blown-out beans, mushy potato cubes, etc. If you're making a soup that ends up as a puree, you don't even have to worry about that (working on an oven-roasted broccoli with potato  and white bean puree soup for the IP for example).

I find the beans - all of them are heirlooms - from Rancho Gordo are more expensive but you get what you pay for. These beans I will try to make an effort to soak because their texture is so much better than a $1.00 bag of Goya or something else sitting on the bottom shelf of a grocery store for who knows how many months/years (and the warehouse before that) it can actually make a difference sometimes and worth the effort.

moof

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2017, 08:20:05 PM »
Slightly off your question, but after I got my beans figured out I moved on to rice to go with them.

I love Trader Joe's frozen brown rice, but it is rather pricey at about a buck for just over a cup of cooked rice per bag.  All my my attempts at brown rice end up with a burned bottom, gloppy middle, and under cooked top.  Then I found out about boiling brown rice.

Simple bullet proof brown rice:
1 part brown, rinsed in cold water (optional).
4+ parts boiling water, anything over a 4:1 ratio is fine, so you can ballpark it easily
1/2 to 1 tsp salt per quart of water, I eyeball this too

Add rice to boiling water, stir once, simmer low partially covered for 25 minutes (a few extra for short grain).
Strain in a mesh colander, serve.

It comes out as good at the Trader Joe's stuff and stores very well in either the fridge or freezer.  You get individual grains that are not mushy.  Goes great with beans, stir fry, or as a dedicated side.

Hmm. Maybe I'm misunderstanding, but you're doing it the hard way.

1 part rice (white or brown), 2 parts water, a little salt.
Salt is not optional if you want perfect rice. It's not just for flavor.
Cover snugly. Leave that cover on, limit peeking.
Bring just to a boil, then turn down very low. Wait. When you can tilt the pot over and the water's all been soaked up, it's done. Takes longer for brown than white. Try a heavier pot and a lower heat if the bottom is burning.
If you like the rice to be separate (not stick together), rinse the excess starch off in a colander before starting.

yeah this.  rice is easy
Mediocre rice, sure.  Try boiled brown rice, easier and way better.

CutTheFat

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #30 on: June 05, 2017, 06:07:06 PM »
I haven't cooked beans from dry directly in a soup before, but I keep finding recipes that suggest doing this.  Anyone say yay or nay? This is the recipe that I'm looking at https://www.dadcooksdinner.com/pressure-cooker-tuscan-bean-soup/.  I already have my beans soaking!

We do this twice a week so theres always soup leftovers in the fridge - almost entirely from dried. It actually can taste even better after a day in the fridge for more time for the flavours to meld. Freezes well too.

I have countless dried beans to soup recipes like the one you linked (usually not soaked b/c I'm lazy to do it the night before). Although the formula (for me anyway) is to use the sautee function for the aromatics (2-3 cloves of minced garlic, white/yellow/red onion, celery/carrot if applicable, misc spices of my choosing), dump in another vegetable if applicable (diced potato, broccoli, raw carrots/peppers/celery perhaps), 2 cups of beans (sometimes all the same bean, or  8x .25 cup of different beans) and dump in 8-9 cups of water or veggie stock. The possibilities are endless.

Overcooking wont turn anything into a disaster but could lead to blown-out beans, mushy potato cubes, etc. If you're making a soup that ends up as a puree, you don't even have to worry about that (working on an oven-roasted broccoli with potato  and white bean puree soup for the IP for example).

I find the beans - all of them are heirlooms - from Rancho Gordo are more expensive but you get what you pay for. These beans I will try to make an effort to soak because their texture is so much better than a $1.00 bag of Goya or something else sitting on the bottom shelf of a grocery store for who knows how many months/years (and the warehouse before that) it can actually make a difference sometimes and worth the effort.

I made it, it is still in the IP now, almost done venting and smells lovely!  I did soak the beans.  The only differences I made to the recipe is, I used homemade chicken stock in place of water, and Pecorino Romano rind instead of Parmigiano-Reggiano rind, since that is what I had on hand.  But the Pecorino isn't really rind-y and might possibly be totally melted into the soup which I wouldn't be opposed to...  I'll have to update how this turns out!     

BlueHouse

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #31 on: June 06, 2017, 08:23:05 AM »
Just chiming in because I started cooking dry black beans in my Instant Pot a week ago too. Funny coincidence.

This worked for me.  I didn't pre-soak at all.  Placing a cup of dry black beans in the instant pot and covering them so that there's 2 inches of water above them, I used the "bean" setting for 30 minutes.  Tasted fine to me.

I've been quietly reading because each time I write something, it sounds like "yes, but..." So tonight I start trying the suggestions. 
First up... dry beans in instantpot on bean setting.  I'm really hoping it's as easy as that.  If so, I'll be more than satisfied.  I guess I let things soak too long and then cooked them too long last time.  I will report back tomorrow. 

I also don't understand how I can take a can of beans, eat them straight from the can and they're fine or cook them for 8+ hours in a slow cooker and they are the same consistency.  And then I can microwave them 3 or 4 or more times later in the week and they're still fine.  Why don't my beans taste and last like that?

meadow lark

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #32 on: June 06, 2017, 01:39:01 PM »
I make a pot of beans in my Instant Pot every week.  I have made them from dry or soaked them overnight, but my current way is to soak them for at least 12 hours, then sprout them for a couple days.  Theoretically they are healthier - but the biggest reason I do it is I love to see things sprout and start to grow - I think they are super cute when they become baby plants.
  If anyone wants to try this, just soak the beans around 12 hours, them drain.  Twice a day rinse them off and leave them in a bowl on the counter - you can cook them at any point, even up to several days later.  Within 24 hrs you can see their little tails starting to stick out.  Then cook them as usual (most large beans I do 14 min on high pressure).
  My favorite place to get beans is the dollar store - they usually have a limited selection of types, but they have my fav (garbanzos).   They are $1/lb, which is the best price I have seen around here, except for an occasional $.89/lb for pintos.  I haven't had any issue with old beans, either. 
  Does anyone else have any great tips on how to get cheap beans?  The ethnic markets around here are not cheaper than the dollar store.
 
 

BlueHouse

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #33 on: June 10, 2017, 08:42:27 AM »
I'm still doing something that is not quite right. 

 I just want plain beans.  As close in consistency and flavor as if I opened up a can, except I want them to come from my freezer and I want a no (or little) sodium.

Here's what I did:
Rinsed beans in colander
Put dry, rinsed beans into instant pot.  Added enough water to cover beans by a few inches.  Did not soak beans.
pushed Instant Pot button for beans in sealed mode (no venting).  It showed 17 minutes and "low", so I didn't change anything.
After the beep, I allowed natural release, and that took about 21 minutes before I could open the pot.  They smelled great (like bacon).
I dumped the beans into a colander. 
I picked up a few beans in a spoon and blew on them.  the skin of the beans blew back (I've read that's how you test for doneness).  I then rinsed the beans in the colander with cool water to stop the cooking and let them sit for a few minutes.
Then I spooned the beans into a few different ziplock.  That's when I noticed that the beans were kind of falling apart and a little bit grainy.  The slightest pressure and they get crushed.
Did I cook them too long?  Should I not have added cool water?  Should I have added salt?  Should I have cooked with broth instead of water?

And when I freeze, should I add water or should I just put beans in a ziplock and freeze? 

This stuff seems like people just know how to do it, but I have never learned it.  Please help!


GrumpyPenguin

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #34 on: June 10, 2017, 08:53:44 AM »
@Bluehouse... hmm, I'm not sure.  I think I have an older model of InstantPot, when I hit "Bean" it defaults to 30 minutes and doesn't actually say if it's on low or high so I have no idea.  I'd think if it's "grainy" it's underdone, but I have no idea.

Not to change the topic too much, but has anyone personally InstantPoted chickpeas?  The guideline says up to 40 minutes (http://instantpot.com/cooking-time/dry-beans-legume-and-lentils/) but they still seem underdone to me.  After putting in 40, testing, and doing another 10, it was still a bit underdone.  How much time do any of you cook them in the IP without presoaking?

Palindrome

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #35 on: June 10, 2017, 07:48:00 PM »
I like beans, but I'm concerned about farts.

Mikila

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #36 on: June 10, 2017, 09:12:04 PM »
Beans are delicious.  Here's how I cook mine, in a stockpot.
1. Rinse
2. Cover with three inches of water.
3. Heat until boiled 15 minutes or so. (on high)
4. Pour off the water and replace with fresh.
5. Repeat steps 3  & 4 twice.
6. Continue to cook, in the lidded pot and on low heat,until done, about 3.5 hrs total for pinto beans.
7.  Add a small amount of salt and cumin within .5 hr of them being done.

  I have found the gas is less due to pouring off the bean broth water as it cooks.

GizmoTX

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #37 on: June 11, 2017, 10:49:30 AM »
The Instant Pot really is the best, easiest, & quickest way to cook dried beans. I've tried all the other methods.
1   pound beans, sorted (any dirt and bad beans removed) and rinsed
7   cups   water 
1   small onion or 2 cloves of garlic, peeled (optional, but adds some flavor)

Sort the beans on a half sheet pan by brushing a little at a time to the other side, removing any stones or dirt clods you find. Rinse the beans, then put them in the pressure cooker. (1 pound of beans will fit a 6 quart cooker. Use a larger stovetop cooker for 2 pounds.)
Add the water, onion and/or garlic, and bay leaf (optional). Bring the cooker up to high pressure, then pressure cook for the time listed in the chart below. Use the Manual button & adjust the time if using the Instant Pot. Let the pressure come down naturally (stovetop: remove from heat).
Black, navy, pinto: Stovetop=30 minutes, Electric=35 minutes
Red kidney, great northern, cannellini: Stovetop=35 minutes, Electric=40 minutes
Garbanzo/chickpeas: Stovetop=40 minutes, Electric=45 minutes
Check a couple of beans for doneness, then use the beans (and their liquid). If they’re still tough, do one of two things: If the beans are close to done, simmer them (without locking the pressure cooker lid) for another five to ten minutes. Otherwise, lock the lid on, bring the pot back up to pressure, and cook under pressure for another 5 minutes. Then quick release the pressure and check them again.
Save the beans for later by refrigerating (for up to a week) or freezing (for up to six months, or longer.) 1.5 cups of cooked beans plus cooking liquid equals a 14.5 ounce can.

ChandraNH

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #38 on: June 12, 2017, 03:00:18 PM »
Not all beans need the same amount of cooking time either, so 17 minutes may be too long (and did you put any aromatics in the pot with the beans?).  Try again, but this time add in some celery, carrot, onion, garlic and set the timer for manual.  Google instant pot beans and see what the different varieties need for time and start on the low end there.

BlueHouse

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #39 on: June 13, 2017, 09:20:19 AM »
Not all beans need the same amount of cooking time either, so 17 minutes may be too long (and did you put any aromatics in the pot with the beans?).  Try again, but this time add in some celery, carrot, onion, garlic and set the timer for manual.  Google instant pot beans and see what the different varieties need for time and start on the low end there.

Just curious, what do people do with all the beans that don't come out right?  I have thrown away pots of beans that are undercooked because they make me sick, but the overcooked ones (the ones that look blown out, with white stuff coming out of split black bean skin) are edible, although smushy and sometimes sludgy. 
I have a pound of beans to eat before I try again. 

Or do people just throw mistakes away?

thisisjeopardy

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #40 on: June 13, 2017, 12:12:03 PM »
I'm still doing something that is not quite right. 

 I just want plain beans.  As close in consistency and flavor as if I opened up a can, except I want them to come from my freezer and I want a no (or little) sodium.

Here's what I did:
Rinsed beans in colander
Put dry, rinsed beans into instant pot.  Added enough water to cover beans by a few inches.  Did not soak beans.
pushed Instant Pot button for beans in sealed mode (no venting).  It showed 17 minutes and "low", so I didn't change anything.
After the beep, I allowed natural release, and that took about 21 minutes before I could open the pot.  They smelled great (like bacon).
I dumped the beans into a colander. 
I picked up a few beans in a spoon and blew on them.  the skin of the beans blew back (I've read that's how you test for doneness).  I then rinsed the beans in the colander with cool water to stop the cooking and let them sit for a few minutes.
Then I spooned the beans into a few different ziplock.  That's when I noticed that the beans were kind of falling apart and a little bit grainy.  The slightest pressure and they get crushed.
Did I cook them too long?  Should I not have added cool water?  Should I have added salt?  Should I have cooked with broth instead of water?

And when I freeze, should I add water or should I just put beans in a ziplock and freeze? 

This stuff seems like people just know how to do it, but I have never learned it.  Please help!

In the years I have used my IP, I have only used 3 buttons on it: Manual, Saute, and Steam. Forget about the Beans button, that's just to make the gadget look more complex and useful.

Consult the charts inside the manual (if you lost the manual, it's online). As someone mentioned above; different beans have different cooking times. The age of them and if they are soaked or not will matter as well.

The only bean I can think of that would get blown at after cooking for 17 minutes would be pulses (split peas, lentils).

I usually do the minimum amount of time on the chart (usually unsoaked but sorted and rinsed):

http://instantpot.com/cooking-time/dry-beans-legume-and-lentils/

When its done cooking I'll turn off the Keep Warm setting (actually I power off the entire thing)

17 minutes on low pressure just seems really odd that dried unsoaked beans would be blown out like that. But to answer your other question, when I freeze them I drain them first and place into ziplock usually by the 1 or 2 pound increment.


KCM5

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #41 on: June 13, 2017, 12:27:49 PM »
Not all beans need the same amount of cooking time either, so 17 minutes may be too long (and did you put any aromatics in the pot with the beans?).  Try again, but this time add in some celery, carrot, onion, garlic and set the timer for manual.  Google instant pot beans and see what the different varieties need for time and start on the low end there.

Just curious, what do people do with all the beans that don't come out right?  I have thrown away pots of beans that are undercooked because they make me sick, but the overcooked ones (the ones that look blown out, with white stuff coming out of split black bean skin) are edible, although smushy and sometimes sludgy. 
I have a pound of beans to eat before I try again. 

Or do people just throw mistakes away?

Undercooked, grainy beans just need to be cooked more.

I don't have an instantpot, but I just cook mine on the stovetop or in a slow cooker. Sometimes for some reason I can't identify I have to cook beans for hours longer than normal - I just cook the crap out of them and eventually they're cooked enough to eat.

One thing that I've noticed is that some beans don't cook through very well if you add acid (like tomatoes) or perhaps even salt. So now I mostly cook beans plain then add them to everything else once they're cooked.

BlueHouse

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #42 on: June 13, 2017, 01:40:51 PM »
Forget about the Beans button, that's just to make the gadget look more complex and useful.
I am crushed by this! 

redbird

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #43 on: June 13, 2017, 10:13:56 PM »
In the years I have used my IP, I have only used 3 buttons on it: Manual, Saute, and Steam. Forget about the Beans button, that's just to make the gadget look more complex and useful.

I've yet to use steam, so for me it's just been manual and saute.

I found this page, and it sounds like most of the functions are just programmed ones, similar to those extra programmed buttons on microwaves that nobody ever uses.

thisisjeopardy

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #44 on: June 13, 2017, 10:17:43 PM »
I use steam function quite a bit. Put a half cup of water in, a steamer tray and veggies (works great for halved potatoes to mash later)

It knows there's no food directly touching the bottom so it heats up way faster. You could do manual or other functions but it would take longer.

Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk


ChandraNH

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #45 on: June 14, 2017, 08:14:51 AM »
If beans don't come out the way you want, you could increase the time to cook them to desired "texture" or, if they are too cooked, make soup (I love soup, so that is my recommendation for everything that doesn't turn out like it should!).

Here's a great soup with a Mexican influence:  Sopa Tarasca (there are many versions of this:  http://hispanickitchen.com/recipes/sopa-tarasca-pinto-bean-soup/

I like mine without tomatoes but instead soaked ancho chilies, fried onion slices and garlic, tossed into a blender and pureed with drained beans, chicken stock (and two tablespoons of oil from sautéing the onion/garlic) and bean broth if needed, then put into a skilled and heated until bubbling, with oregano (preferably Mexican oregano), a handful of cilantro and salt.  top with fried tortilla strips, crema (Mexican table cream) and anything else you may want.  It's silky, delicious and even my non-bean-loving husband really likes it.


ZiziPB

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #46 on: June 14, 2017, 02:42:37 PM »
Can you forget the pressure cooker or slow cooker for a while and try cooking them in a normal pot like people recommend?  The problem with the pressure cooker is that you have no control over what's going on inside and no ability to adjust while the beans are cooking.

Beans are easy to cook if you soak them overnight.  And if you cook them in a regular pot after soaking, then you can check on them from time to time and stop cooking them when they are perfect :-)

BabyShark

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #47 on: June 14, 2017, 02:48:20 PM »
If you forget to soak your beans (which I ALWAYS do), this is the quick soak method I use from Skinnytaste in the IP:

Pressure cooker pre-soak: Rinse beans and add them to the Instant Pot with 8 cups of water and 2 teaspoons of Kosher salt. Close the lid and pressure-cook in manual mode for 4 minutes. When cycle is finished, switch to “Keep Warm” mode for 10 minutes. Drain and rinse beans.

Read more at http://www.skinnytaste.com/instant-pot-rock-creek-ranch-black-beans/#wjYWo2k47u8CLaXW.99

I also usually just follow her recipe for times/water amounts, but often I'll change up the spices.  I have taken to including bacon and onion in my black beans though.  Yum.

redbird

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Re: BEANS!
« Reply #48 on: June 14, 2017, 03:00:23 PM »
Something worth trying that I'm actually going to be trying myself - buy bulk beans if you can. I've heard they can be fresher, especially if the store has good bulk turnover, as opposed to the bags of beans. It is supposed to affect the taste.

I am very new to dry beans in that I've only cooked them twice before and both times it was bagged, so I don't have personal experience either way. But my new grocery store has a good bulk section (honestly haven't really had that before - I remember bulk existing more in grocery stores when I was a kid but then they had disappeared when I turned an adult) and I bought some black beans from it.