Author Topic: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.  (Read 5276 times)

Tami1982

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I decided to buy new linoleum tiles and baseboards for the bathroom.  Tonight I pried up the boards and found this.  I don't know how to do anything, but I assume I have to replace the entire wall?  Unfortunately, That's behind the toilet so I'm going to have to move the toilet to do it. 

I believe this to be caused by toilet tank condensation.  Any advice so that I do not have to do this again?

Also, the jerkfaces who flipped my house put trim in behind the cabinet - advice on how to remove?

homehandymum

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #1 on: March 21, 2014, 12:21:08 AM »
no answers.

commenting to learn more from those who know.

BayIslandSaver

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2014, 02:18:37 AM »
definitely find out how far that mold spreads.

try not to disturb it too much or use a respirator/mask while in the area.

find the source of the moisture and fix that.  if it's near the toilet, hopefully it's just a leaky valve.
a brass valve will run $6-7.  once the moisture source is fixed you can move on to the clean-up.

you can clean it with diluted bleach and see whether it just the surface or not.
if the drywall is not damaged or just slightly, you could try covering it with a few coats of Zinsser Gardz and primer.

with this said, it'll be hard to tell whether you have more mold on the inside face of the drywall without tearing some up.

best of luck!

plantingourpennies

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #3 on: March 21, 2014, 05:07:24 AM »
you can clean it with diluted bleach and see whether it just the surface or not.

Coming from a non-expert, bleach doesn't work on porous surfaces like drywall.  It only kills mold on the surface, while letting the water from the bleach seep into the drywall and possibly provide more moisture to promote further mold growth.  =(

I would start cutting out drywall (with a mask or hire someone without mold allergies to do this) until you are sure you have reached the outer edges of the mold growth. Mold is no joke, and in big enough quantities can cause serious health problems in some people. 

TomTX

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #4 on: March 21, 2014, 05:59:39 AM »
you can clean it with diluted bleach and see whether it just the surface or not.

Coming from a non-expert, bleach doesn't work on porous surfaces like drywall.  It only kills mold on the surface, while letting the water from the bleach seep into the drywall and possibly provide more moisture to promote further mold growth.  =(

I would start cutting out drywall (with a mask or hire someone without mold allergies to do this) until you are sure you have reached the outer edges of the mold growth. Mold is no joke, and in big enough quantities can cause serious health problems in some people.

I prefer to bleach before disturbing the affected area - kill off stuff before it is stirred up.

But yes - drywall that bad needs to be cut out.

thelamb

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2014, 06:24:33 AM »
Not an expert...  It looks like only the trim has been pulled back so far.  If it were me, I'm definitely taking out the toilet and existing flooring to address the underlying sub floor and see where it's coming from and how far it spreads.  Ideally what you'll just need to do is pull up and replace an almost paper-thin sub, cut out and replace a small patch of drywall behind the toilet, and clean with bleach and apply killz in various places.  That might sound bad but if that's all it is you're looking at a day of work and a fairly reasonable shopping list:  sheet of sub floor, some nails, bleach, Killz, patch of drywall, some mud, some tape. 

BayIslandSaver

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #6 on: March 21, 2014, 02:54:56 PM »
If you're lucky the bleach will reveal the mold was only on the surface. That's what I meant with ..."and see whether it just the surface or not." 

Much greater problem if it spread.
Replacing drywall isn't so bad.  For bathrooms, you should use the 'purple' board meant for bathrooms.
It is also fire-rated.  You might want to check you local building codes.  They are sold in large sheets at your big box store, but if you only have a mustachian econocar such as myself, you can scrore/cut the pieces down in the parking lot or diy a roof rack: http://www.instructables.com/id/Drywall-and-Plywood-Cartop-Carrier--Roof-Rack/

I used to be a serial diyer.  I remodeled 2 baths...one mostly cosmetic and one down to the studs (with permits, electrical, plumbing, etc.).
« Last Edit: March 21, 2014, 02:58:30 PM by BayIslandSaver »

Tami1982

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #7 on: March 26, 2014, 10:29:08 AM »
Thank you everyone for your advice!  I so appreciate it.  Once I removed the baseboard completely and cleaned the area I found it was only in that very small area about 3" high and not very deep at all.  This really confirmed to me that it was the sweaty toilet tank that was responsible and not a leak elsewhere.  I should never have heated the bathroom this winter.  (I didn't the year before and all was good.)

 It was suggested I could just kilz the whole thing and call it good, but I have a severe mold allergy (I had an asthma attack so bad after cleaning that that I threw up twice.) so I decided to remove the dry wall going up about 6 inches.  So, we removed that and replaced it.  I'm going to sand the mud down today and seal it with Kilz.  I'm also going to Kilz the new baseboards just be extra careful.  Then I will retexture the wall, maybe kilz again, and then finally paint it. 

I was really scared this would be an expensive undertaking, but it ended up running me about $50 for everything.  And $20 for a little dehumidifier thing that has crystals that absorb moisture and turn pink when full - then you plug it in and it dries out.  Can be reused for 10 years.  It is now parked behind the toilet.  While the toilet is no longer sweating now that I am not heating the bathroom, I felt better safe than sorry in picking up the dehumidifier.


mlipps

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #8 on: March 26, 2014, 10:32:18 AM »
Can I just say that you're a badass for persevering & still doing this yourself even with your allergy? Way to go. Make sure you take care of your health though!

Milspecstache

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #9 on: March 26, 2014, 10:38:32 AM »
Consumer Reports rates Behr from Home Depot really highly.  They sell Behr that has an anti-mold/mildew additive.  I would repaint with that.

Exflyboy

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #10 on: March 26, 2014, 12:52:42 PM »
You did exactly what i would have done (I'm a DIY expert).. I.e removed the bad sheetrock and see how far it progressed.

i would have sprayed the indide of the wall cavity with dilute beleatch and let it dry before covering.. But its probably just fine now you have removed the mold.

in future spray the mold first to kill the active spores before you attempt to remove it.. and wear a mask of course.

You can also buy the dehumidifer crystals in bulk (Harbor Freight used to carry it) also from your local craft store.. Just put them in a porus bag till they turn colour.

You can then dry the crystals in the oven at 300F.. you know when they are done because the colour turns back.. You an use them over and over.

Frank

Greg

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #11 on: March 27, 2014, 09:15:09 AM »
Sounds like you handled it.  In addition to tank sweating, the moisture could also come from the tank supply fitting or angle-stop (shut-off valve).  These items can have a very slow drip that can cause problems like this.

As for the trim behind the cabinet, that sucks.  Check first to make sure it's not just a toe kick panel installed over the end of the trim.  If not, and it truly does extend all the way back, a oscillating blade multi-tool with a flush cutting blade would be what I would use.  You could check with friends and rental places to see if you can borrow/rent one if you don't have one or don't want to buy one.

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #12 on: March 27, 2014, 11:19:51 AM »
also you have a sufficient fan and gap between bottom of door and floor. Too many people put in undersized fans and not big enough gaps for bathrooms to breathe

Exflyboy

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #13 on: March 27, 2014, 11:20:20 AM »
Sounds like you handled it.  In addition to tank sweating, the moisture could also come from the tank supply fitting or angle-stop (shut-off valve).  These items can have a very slow drip that can cause problems like this.

As for the trim behind the cabinet, that sucks.  Check first to make sure it's not just a toe kick panel installed over the end of the trim.  If not, and it truly does extend all the way back, a oscillating blade multi-tool with a flush cutting blade would be what I would use.  You could check with friends and rental places to see if you can borrow/rent one if you don't have one or don't want to buy one.

Those things are awesome.. thats is my next tool I will own...:)

Frank

Tami1982

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Re: Bathroom reno - How something simple becomes more complicated.
« Reply #14 on: March 29, 2014, 02:00:12 PM »
Sounds like you handled it.  In addition to tank sweating, the moisture could also come from the tank supply fitting or angle-stop (shut-off valve).  These items can have a very slow drip that can cause problems like this.

As for the trim behind the cabinet, that sucks.  Check first to make sure it's not just a toe kick panel installed over the end of the trim.  If not, and it truly does extend all the way back, a oscillating blade multi-tool with a flush cutting blade would be what I would use.  You could check with friends and rental places to see if you can borrow/rent one if you don't have one or don't want to buy one.

I will keep an eye on the value, but as far as I can tell the only moisture back there is coming off the sweaty damn tank! 

I had to google all the words in your second paragraph.  Toe kick panel?  Oscillating blade multitool?  LOL!  Love learning all the new things:)   But yes, they just put a piece of trim in that wall, nailed it in 9,000 times and then put the cabinet in.  Jerk faces!   :)  A friend of my dad's has a garage and barn full of every tool on the planet so I will ask him if he has one of those to borrow. 

I so appreciate the advice and support!  I'm going to spray the texture today (only need to do about a 2in wide gap because the trim will cover most of it.)  Let that dry.  Kilz it again, plus Kilz all the naked walls where I removed baseboards just to be safe.  Then I need to clean, Kilz, and paint my baseboards and touch up that 2in gap.   

also you have a sufficient fan and gap between bottom of door and floor. Too many people put in undersized fans and not big enough gaps for bathrooms to breathe

The bathroom is quite small.  Maybe 5x9? including the sink/counter and bathtub.  I tend to leave the door open most of the time, but the gap between the door and the floor is maybe about a 1/2 inch?  The only time I close it is in the evening because there is a lot of sunlight coming through there and it'll wake me up:)