Author Topic: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons  (Read 21766 times)

Astatine

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Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« on: December 11, 2017, 11:46:58 PM »
Keeping this Aussie-only because convenience foods vary so much in different countries.

What foods do you eat when you have run out of spoons? Link to spoon theory here if you're not familiar with the concept. Given we're on MMM, we'll assume that we're mostly trying to avoid takeaway or eating out as the standard default, but anything else is fair game. Edit: like frozen meals, tinned food, pre-prepared food, stuff with minimal prep.

Edit: Healthy is a) relative and differs from person to person and b) it's all about being fed with hopefully at least one macronutrient addressed in a meal (carbs, fat, protein, fruit or veggies as a bodgy nutritional starting point). There will be no shaming in this thread :)


I'll start.

Our standard no spoons meal is 1 red capsicum and 1 peeled carrot cut into sticks, served with a couple of slices of low fat Aldi cheese (which we always have on hand in the fridge). Serves two.

« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 12:43:43 AM by Astatine »

HappierAtHome

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #1 on: December 11, 2017, 11:52:38 PM »
Not particularly healthy, but packets of pasta+sauce (the kind you cook up with milk and butter, e.g. Alfredo from Aldi) help me when I'm low on spoons AND desperate for something comforting.

Heinz big red tomato soup + hot buttered toast.

Sweet potato cooked whole in the microwave, eaten with butter, salt and pepper.

Avocado on toast.

Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #2 on: December 11, 2017, 11:55:26 PM »
I think healthy is a) relative and differs from person to person and b) it's all about being fed with hopefully at least one macronutrient addressed in a meal (carbs, fat, protein, fruit or veggies as a bodgy nutritional starting point). There will be no shaming in this thread :)


Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2017, 11:57:52 PM »
'On the menu' brand frozen meals available at Woolies for about $3 per meal and sometimes available at other supermarkets like Supabarn or IGA (might be available at Coles but I never go there).

The tastiest ones are beef ragu, spaghetti and meatballs, beef lasagna and veggie lasagna. The cheese or chicken based ones are edible but a bit meh.

Edit: DH and I have been low on spoons for months so we have tested many of the Aldi and Woolies frozen meals. 'On the menu' brand is the tastiest in our opinion and bonus, tends to be close to the cheapest.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 12:01:13 AM by Astatine »

marty998

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #4 on: December 12, 2017, 03:23:31 AM »
Oh this is easy. Cheese and Vegemite sandwiches :)

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #5 on: December 12, 2017, 04:23:41 AM »
Heinz big red tomato soup + hot buttered toast.

Heinz big red tomato soup with a cheese toastie.

Eggs. Scrambled eggs on toast. Boiled eggs with Vegemite soldiers. Hard-boiled eggs with carrot sticks and cheese.

Smoothies. You can pack in a lot of nutrients and it only takes 30 seconds to blend. Also handy if someone isnít up to proper meals.

limeandpepper

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #6 on: December 12, 2017, 07:17:47 AM »
- Muesli with yoghurt (or soy milk)
- Smoothies
- Fruit
- Nuts
- Hot Twiggy sticks
- Cheese and crackers
- Canned fish
- Boiled eggs with soy sauce and pepper
- Vegemite and butter toast
- Miso soup with tofu and veggies
- Weetbix or muesli bars
- Chocolate Up & Go

ixtap

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #7 on: December 12, 2017, 09:55:44 AM »
US, but most of these are not particularly American. Most are quicker than throwing something frozen in the oven.

 My husband doesn't have any spoons for meal planning. If I didn't feed him something else once in awhile, he would have the same menu everyday:

-Hash made of rehydrated potatoes, 1/4 onion, two sausage links, served with two eggs
-Kale salad mix, shredded rotisserie chicken, feta, olives craisins
-pasta shells with copious amounts of Parmesan cheese. Will add sauce if he has leftover shells to heat up.
-Oranges galore, pretzels and cheese as needed

I have a spoon or two, and thus more variety, but the fall backs are:
-quesadillas: corn tortillas, salsa, maybe avocado, grilled veg when I have an extra spoon available
-Ramen with onion, peppers and mushrooms, add an egg
-Milk with instant coffee or yogurt for breakfast
-chopped up cabbage with chicken for protein and either vinegar and soy sauce or husband's left over salad dressing

Our guilty pleasure is super cheap frozen pizza, but that I'd brand specific.
Husband can also eat copious amounts of three bean salad: one can each garbanzo, kidney and green beans, dressed with oil, vinegar, black pepper and a smidge of sugar.

ozbeach

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #8 on: December 12, 2017, 07:19:36 PM »
I throw lettuce (out of the garden, or a bag from the supermarket), a tin of chick peas and another of four-bean mix into a bowl, chop up a tomato if one is handy, anything else that might be in the fridge and that's enough filling salad for at least two nights.

terran

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #9 on: December 12, 2017, 08:29:16 PM »
Not Australian, but this isn't specific to the food itself. Almost all our dinners are cooked in big batches on the weekend, most of the batches frozen and then cycled through during the week. Avoids having to do too much during the week, and avoids eating the same thing multiple times in a row.

A couple of current favorites: https://www.budgetbytes.com/2011/10/turmeric-chicken/ and https://www.budgetbytes.com/2015/12/slow-cooker-chicken-tikka-masala/. We do both in the crockpot now, and shred the chicken because it seems to do better in the freezer. We cook rice day of (20 minutes), but rice does ok (not great) in the freezer, so you could do the whole thing ahead of time if you want. If you want to kick it up a notch https://www.budgetbytes.com/2010/09/naan/ does well in the freezer too.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 08:34:43 PM by terran »

one piece at a time

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #10 on: December 12, 2017, 08:37:16 PM »
oats with whey protein and olive oil.

juice as a side dish.

MBot

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #11 on: December 12, 2017, 08:55:20 PM »
Postpartum I came up with this and it was immensely helpful. It takes a minute to make and it's fairly well balanced.

Add these three things to a pot and heat up:

Can of minestrone soup
Can of beans like white kidney beans or navy beans (drain off liquid first, rinse if you have the energy)
Handful of baby spinach or torn up regular spinach.

Eat as a soup.

If you want to go a step further (though I usually didn't )
- need more fat? add a little oil or grate cheese on top
- need more carbs?  Make a rice cooker of rice and serve over rice
- need more protein? Add some dry TVP (veggie protein) and a little more water and heat an extra few minutes till it rehydrates. I've also added small bits of sausage before. 

middo

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #12 on: December 12, 2017, 09:08:05 PM »
Vegemite toast.  Add an egg if you want a bit more protein.

TartanTallulah

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #13 on: December 12, 2017, 10:42:21 PM »
At the end of a long day at work when I can barely stand up straight or string two words together, my go-to is a tin of chunky soup. I always keep a shelf of tinned soups in the cupboard.

HappierAtHome

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #14 on: December 12, 2017, 10:47:48 PM »
Oh this is easy. Cheese and Vegemite sandwiches :)

Vegemite toast.  Add an egg if you want a bit more protein.

See, this is why it's important to have Aussie-specific threads!

mrcheese

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #15 on: December 13, 2017, 12:54:18 AM »
1 single serve pouch flavoured microwave rice, one pouch frozen steam fresh veggies, 1 85g tin tuna,
nuke first two ingredients, stir all together in a mixing bowl, eat from said mixing bowl while watching trashy tv.

Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #16 on: December 13, 2017, 01:30:34 AM »
At the end of a long day at work when I can barely stand up straight or string two words together, my go-to is a tin of chunky soup. I always keep a shelf of tinned soups in the cupboard.

DH and I lived on tinned soup for a week when we both came down with the lurgy from hell last year. (reheating frozen leftovers was too hard but tinned soup was a bit less effort)

1 single serve pouch flavoured microwave rice, one pouch frozen steam fresh veggies, 1 85g tin tuna,
nuke first two ingredients, stir all together in a mixing bowl, eat from said mixing bowl while watching trashy tv.

We're having a veggie version of that for dinner tonight.

1 ripe avocado, 1 85g tin of plain tuna, couple of chopped up cherry tomatoes and a bit of cucumber, bit of red onion and some lemon juice, all mashed together. (if DH didn't have the energy to chop the tomatoes, cucumber and red onion, it would have just been avocado, tuna and lemon juice)



Another suggestion: Aldi's meal replacement shakes, mixed with about 300 or 400ml of milk. I like the strawberry and coffee flavoured ones, the vanilla and chocolate ones were meh.

Anatidae V

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #17 on: December 13, 2017, 04:16:15 AM »
Weetbix with milk. Normally left until mushy because I'm too tired to chew.

Oat porridge, made with quick oats & water in microwave. Sir through jam or frozen fruit, and yoghurt if you can have dairy for extra protein.

I've taken to keeping extra tubs of home made Hommus in the freezer, though these are best defrosted in the fridge from the day before. Serve with veg of your choice. Or just crackers.

Fruit + fetta, yoghurt or aged cheddar.

We made a batch of Super Boring Bolognaise (onion, garlic, olive oil, 1 kg mince, tin of chopped tomatoes, sachet tomato paste, salt & pepper, spoon of Vegemite) at the start of some weeks and eat that on pasta, bread or corn chips for every non-breakfast meal until it runs out. I've discovered is delicious with caramelised onions from a jar and some mayo. You could swap some mince for tinned beans. You could eat it on lettuce leaves. Adding soy sauce might give it an Asian flavour so you can have Mexican for lunch (use salsa, serve on corn chips) and Asian for dinner (use soy sauce and kewpie mayo, serve on lettuce leaves).

We had mince the last 2 weeks, so next week is chicken. Wrap chicken breast in baking paper (season with olive oil, salt, pepper). Lie on couch for 30-40 minutes. Enjoy perfectly cooked, most chicken breast. Scales up or down easily. If you need to eat chicken with something, microwave frozen veg and/or cook rice in microwave... Though that's starting to get into needing at least 1 soon. This makes us at least 2 dinners.
« Last Edit: December 13, 2017, 04:20:18 AM by Anatidae V »

Slow&Steady

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #18 on: December 13, 2017, 11:10:16 AM »
Totally off topic, I apologize but I have never read about the Spoon Theory and am really glad I opened this thread (even if I am not Aussie).

My DH has MS and this will be a great way to explain it to people who feel the need to comment "but he doesn't look sick".

Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #19 on: December 14, 2017, 03:08:14 AM »
Tonight was fresh (or least, not frozen) meat pies from a small supermarket heated in the oven and served with tomato sauce.


Totally off topic, I apologize but I have never read about the Spoon Theory and am really glad I opened this thread (even if I am not Aussie).

My DH has MS and this will be a great way to explain it to people who feel the need to comment "but he doesn't look sick".

No need to apologise, glad it was helpful for you :)

Anatidae V

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #20 on: December 14, 2017, 06:34:48 AM »
Not a no-spoons meal, but today I discovered I don't even need to finely chop & sautee onion when making soup. I chopped into 6 chunky pieces and dumped it in the pot with the various root vegetables. It still pureed with the stick blender without any problems and the flavour came through nicely.

Closer to a no-spoons meal: Coles sells a really nice brand of mini turkish breads, which I slice in half and freeze. They are great as a base for pizza (sauce + leftovers + cheese), with soup, toasted and with an egg on top, whatever. Yum.
« Last Edit: December 14, 2017, 06:36:28 AM by Anatidae V »

ElleFiji

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #21 on: December 14, 2017, 07:09:44 AM »
Not an Aussie, just stealing your ideas

LifeHappens

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #22 on: December 14, 2017, 08:23:03 AM »
Our standard no spoons meal is 1 red capsicum and 1 peeled carrot cut into sticks, served with a couple of slices of low fat Aldi cheese (which we always have on hand in the fridge). Serves two.
Mine is similar. Some veggie sticks, hummus and maybe pita bread or pita chips if available.

Adram

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #23 on: December 15, 2017, 12:01:42 AM »
I have no suggestion for you but that spoons thing was the best thing i read all week. Thanks for the link.

Zikoris

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #24 on: December 15, 2017, 11:02:45 AM »
I don't mean to be a downer (and I'm not Australian), but maybe if that's happening it would be a good idea to take a hard look at your entire meal system? If I found myself hungry, too tired to cook, and with nothing prepared in advance, the first thing I would think would be "Wow, I screwed up big time, and need to find a permanent solution so this bullshit never happens again!".

That could take the form of freezer meals, crock pot meals, weekend bulk meal prep (my personal system), or even just keeping sandwich supplies on hand at all times. I personally don't think systems that require daily effort are sustainable for most people.

TrMama

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #25 on: December 15, 2017, 11:57:36 AM »
Not an Aussie, but my biggest no spoons workaround is to make sure I order the groceries online and have them delivered. When I put the order in, I make sure to include things like pre-chopped fresh veggies, bagged salad, paper plates and all the other easy to eat foods.

Not having to go out and then schlep the heavy things home is key to having more spoons available for other stuff. Like actually eating.


HappierAtHome

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #26 on: December 15, 2017, 12:53:31 PM »
I don't mean to be a downer (and I'm not Australian), but maybe if that's happening it would be a good idea to take a hard look at your entire meal system? If I found myself hungry, too tired to cook, and with nothing prepared in advance, the first thing I would think would be "Wow, I screwed up big time, and need to find a permanent solution so this bullshit never happens again!".

That could take the form of freezer meals, crock pot meals, weekend bulk meal prep (my personal system), or even just keeping sandwich supplies on hand at all times. I personally don't think systems that require daily effort are sustainable for most people.

When you're dealing with chronic illness, sometimes even really excellent systems fail.

Did you read the linked explanation of Spoon Theory? That might help with some insight into what people are dealing with :-)

Zikoris

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #27 on: December 15, 2017, 01:56:45 PM »
I don't mean to be a downer (and I'm not Australian), but maybe if that's happening it would be a good idea to take a hard look at your entire meal system? If I found myself hungry, too tired to cook, and with nothing prepared in advance, the first thing I would think would be "Wow, I screwed up big time, and need to find a permanent solution so this bullshit never happens again!".

That could take the form of freezer meals, crock pot meals, weekend bulk meal prep (my personal system), or even just keeping sandwich supplies on hand at all times. I personally don't think systems that require daily effort are sustainable for most people.


When you're dealing with chronic illness, sometimes even really excellent systems fail.

Did you read the linked explanation of Spoon Theory? That might help with some insight into what people are dealing with :-)

I did read it. It see me like having really airtight systems could help hat sort of situation even more than a regular healthy person. You could modify that so much to make things easier. Quit shaving your legs if it's too difficult. Why on earth would you have clothes with buttons if you struggle with that? I'm 100% healthy and don't own anything with buttons because I'm too lazy to spend my time buttoning things. Find a hairstyle that works on both good and bad days. Make two giant crock pot meals on the weekend and eat that all week. Yes, chronic illness sucks, but there are workarounds for everything.

Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #28 on: December 15, 2017, 02:49:15 PM »
HAH is nicer than me. Did you not read there is to be no shaming in this thread?

And maybe take a moment to be grateful that you have never needed to be in this situation.

I'm pretty cranky btw. There is no need for you to post in this thread. It's the MMM forum, all of us know about making crockpot meals and freezing them. This is all about when you don't have the spoons to do that. I have had the energy to cook 3 times (yes 3) in the past 6 months.




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ElleFiji

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #29 on: December 15, 2017, 04:04:18 PM »
My first questions on MMM, years ago, were about this very topic. I cried when I got shamed.

Later, on my own, I managed to use my fancy blender to replace some of the meals out. Not all, but some. So now I stands up for my blender in any Vitamix thread.

For me, pursuing financial independence IS my long term change to one day cut my work hours so that I can use more of my limited energy on food.

Oh! And I figured out last year to buy a microwave. It helps, even if all I can do is microwave popcorn

HappierAtHome

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #30 on: December 15, 2017, 04:28:02 PM »
I think being chronically ill is something you just can't 'get' if you haven't been through it.

Zikoris, we are talking about being too ill to cook even a simple slow cooker meal, for an ongoing period of time (weeks, months, years). Or maybe you can scrape together the energy to make one big batch of something easy in the slow cooker, but then after throwing it up all night after a flare-up you desperately don't want to eat it again the very next night. Maybe the reality is that as somebody who is 100% healthy, you can't relate to these issues (hence why you refer to it as having screwed up big time, and as bullshit - truly inappropriate language). That's my most diplomatic interpretation of your post - that you just don't understand what it is we're talking about.

My first questions on MMM, years ago, were about this very topic. I cried when I got shamed.

I am so sorry you had that experience.

For me, pursuing financial independence IS my long term change to one day cut my work hours so that I can use more of my limited energy on food.

Oh! And I figured out last year to buy a microwave. It helps, even if all I can do is microwave popcorn

That's one of the big reasons I cut down to part-time work a couple of years ago. I couldn't get to work five days a week AND complete basic self-care like getting myself fed, or getting myself fed with something more complex than salt and vinegar chips.

Microwaves are excellent. I am also a big fan of my food processor, which does my chopping, slicing and grating to give my arthritic hands a break.

Melody

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #31 on: December 15, 2017, 04:32:41 PM »
I buy 1kg (14 bits) of frozen white fish from coles $7... will do 7 meals. This can then served with a salad/in a wrap/with a side of deb (instant mash)... living in a hot climate i basically always have salad items in the fridge.
Heinz also makes a product called curry beans. They often go on special for $1.50. Then i just whack some rice in the rice cooker and adds some herbs on top (if my current herb plant is alive... hot climate kills plants).
I also am fortunate enough that my work provides delicious healthy staff meals, so i feel no guilt in having a cheese toastie dinner if i had a big chicken salad at lunch, fresh fruit for snacks etc.

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Anatidae V

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #32 on: December 15, 2017, 05:10:09 PM »
ANZAC biscuits are a current easy favourite of mine. I use SR flour instead of bicarb+boiling water+plain flour; I use olive oil instead of butter. That makes it a pantry meal (I also use about half the sugar):
http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/anzac-biscuits/cc4e2031-8b63-48e7-8eff-b2637f472180

Edited to add my recipe, because the linked one sounds too complex.
Put in bowl 1 cup each of SR flour, fine dessicated coconut and rolled oats
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons water (add an extra if adding dried fruit)
2 tablespoons golden syrup
Put bowl on scales. Add 125g olive oil.
Mix.
Spread on baking tray
20 mi utes in 150-180degC oven.
Cool and break off to snack as desired.

I add whatever seeds/nuts/ dried fruit we have in the pantry (pepitas and sultanas was excellent). Then I have enough energy to get through my day with baby even if he takes No Naps (or all naps on me).

It all sounds more complicated than I've found it so far. Must review my no spoons meals and add some from this thread.
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 05:34:35 PM by Anatidae V »

Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #33 on: December 15, 2017, 05:48:15 PM »
Melody, I'm curious how you cook your frozen fish?

And Ducky, that sounds delicious. Canola oil also works in ANZAC bikkies (I've been too nervous to try olive oil in case you can taste it so I use canola oil instead).

HappierAtHome

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #34 on: December 15, 2017, 05:55:38 PM »
And Ducky, that sounds delicious. Canola oil also works in ANZAC bikkies (I've been too nervous to try olive oil in case you can taste it so I use canola oil instead).

I've used olive oil and couldn't taste it - but I might be less sensitive to tastes than you are.

Flyingkea

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #35 on: December 15, 2017, 06:11:17 PM »
My easy go to meal at the moment is frozen food + hot chips baked in the oven.

Sometimes that frozen food might be crumbed fish fillets, sausage rolls, pizza, or things like samosas/spring rolls. In our woolies there is a 'dynasty banquet' in a big purple box that has spring rolls, samosas and money bags.

Another thing to maybe try - when I was a kid we used to do a lot of hiking, and often we would get given a can of 'big eats' for dinner. I remember these being nice even after being cooked over a campfire. I think there were flavours like beef stew, stroganoff etc, but it has been a while. They could be easily heated up in a microwave, and are fairly big cans.

Other foods we have done: eggs/spaghetti/baked beans on toast. Nachos (layers of corn chips, baked beans and cheese baked in oven), salad rolls. (Burger bun with things like cheese, beetroot, lettuce, tomato, sliced ham, tomato)

Poundwise

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #36 on: December 15, 2017, 06:45:10 PM »
I was thinking about this thread at dinner. Thanks for the link to the article! 
I definitely was out of spoons today... two out of three kids sick with flu and I'm fighting it.  Plus the oldest most helpful one has his hand in a cast. I ended up browning some ground beef, chopped onions, and chopped carrots. Mixed them with some leftover cooked rice, frozen peas, and lots of ketchup.  Had omelets cooked in butter on the side. Sort of a fake fried rice. It exhausted me and used up some of tomorrow's spoons which is too bad because I need them.

More ideas.
Storebought pizza dough wrapped around hot dog and baked in toaster oven.

Hotdogs and beans... dump can of beans into baking pan, chop wieners in thirds, sprinkle brown sugar and squirt ketchup on top.  Bake at 350 until heated through, then mix a bit with spoon.

hot pasta, dump some uncooked sauce or pesto on top and mix around.

Except we've had all these in the last two weeks so kids are sick of them. You can get away with a lot more if you don't have kids.

Here is also a great bunch of recipes that I printed out 10 years ago. Some are very little work.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/18/dining/18mini.html


Anatidae V

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #37 on: December 15, 2017, 06:56:03 PM »
Easy meal: sliced tomatoes with some salt & pepper on water crackers. Add protein with hummus* or cheese.

*I'm not actually sure how to spell hummus so I spell it a different way every time...

Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #38 on: December 15, 2017, 07:12:53 PM »
My first questions on MMM, years ago, were about this very topic. I cried when I got shamed.

I'm so sorry :(

tbh I was very close to tears this morning. I was very angry to start with and then switched to very upset. It hasn't been an easy year for me, medical-wise (even though I haven't had anything life-threatening this year other than the usual background stuff).

Later, on my own, I managed to use my fancy blender to replace some of the meals out. Not all, but some. So now I stands up for my blender in any Vitamix thread.

For me, pursuing financial independence IS my long term change to one day cut my work hours so that I can use more of my limited energy on food.

Oh! And I figured out last year to buy a microwave. It helps, even if all I can do is microwave popcorn

:) That's awesome you were able to work out some solutions and systems that work for you! In part that's why I wanted to start this thread because we all have our own workarounds for no/low spoon food, but when you're really tired/rundown/no extra energy, it's so hard to be creative and think of new things. So we can all piggy back off each other's systems and try new things if they seem like they might work for us.

<3


*I'm not actually sure how to spell hummus so I spell it a different way every time...

*Same.



Today's lunch:

Carrot sticks
Capsicum sticks
Few slices of cucumber
A couple of slices of Red Leicester cheese (fancy! tastes a bit like creamy cheddar)
SSS brand hommous*
Chunk of liverwurst (because my iron levels tend to be low and vegetarian meals are usually less effort than meat based ones)
Dijon mustard for the liverwurst

It was delicious and felt fancy because there was a variety of food. :)



Another meal that we do often is get the kale slaw (which comes with a yummy yoghurt/garlic dressing to mix through) which we get from Aldi or Woolies. And have a couple of pieces of low-fat cheese on the side for a bit of protein.

mustachepungoeshere

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #39 on: December 15, 2017, 09:11:20 PM »
Homemade potato wedges. Cut up a potato or two, onto a baking tray with olive oil and salt (or more spices, if you feel up to it). Bake. Low impact, but you do need to have time. I've done these when I've been home sick from work. I just go back to bed while they cook.

Supermarket BBQ chicken with salad or steamed (microwaved) frozen broccoli and cauliflower.

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #40 on: December 16, 2017, 01:08:06 AM »
I am lucky that I'm not in any way sensitive to dairy, because it's been the one thing that's managed to get some calories (and protein, fat, and carbs) into me when I had next to zero spoons.

For the first month after my brain surgery, I consumed almost nothing but whole milk, about 1/2 gallon a day. It had almost no flavor (good, because everything including water tasted Wrong), kept me full, had no smell, and I could get it myself (walking to the kitchen, pouring the milk, and walking back to the bed/sofa was literally the maximum I was capable of doing).

I still drink a glass of it for breakfast, and sometimes another for dinner. I am slowly getting spoons back, but still usually only eat one time per day, and it's usually leftovers from a restaurant meal or take-out food. I cook something simple about once every two weeks when I suddenly find myself with an almost normal supply of spoons.

It's not ideal, but I'm alive.

deborah

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #41 on: December 16, 2017, 03:48:46 AM »
It doesn't matter how you eat your food. The small tins of flavoured tuna are really cheap, and a can on a bread roll , with a whole tomato (not cut up) as a side, and a lettuce leaf or two, can be a lunch. Most salad vegetables don't need to be cut up, and this can save your hands and wrists. I don't peel carrots. Salad vegetables that really need to be cut have been gradually eliminated (I always hated cucumber). I have been known to eat a whole red pepper. When I feel like it, I do cut up salad vegetables, I just don't feel obliged to.

Most of the year (not now, it's far too hot) for tea we have soup which we cook on Sunday and have until Thursday night, with slices of toast. On Friday night and Saturday night we have something different.

One of the advantages of these sorts of meals is that they also don't generate many dishes, so there is very little in the way of dish washing. The bowls get washed each night, and the soup pot gets washed when it is emptied on Friday, having spent the week in the fridge. SO really likes the Woollies Select box meals for one - for instance the Satay Chicken. We chop up some vegetables, nuke them for 3 minutes, and then add the sauce and nuke the rice at the same time, so it turns into a meal for two rather than one.

I am a fan of a sandwich press, which cooks just about anything you grill or fry without making a mess, and you just wipe it clean. Pancakes - just pour in some batter, put it on the closest setting, close the lid, and you instantly have a pancake (same for omelets...). Same with chips (they take a bit longer). When I was recovering from my accident, I really couldn't stand around for long, waiting for food to cook. My back would start to ache if I did any amount of stirring or cutting. If I sat down while food was cooking, I would sometimes go to sleep. Changing to the microwave and sandwich press as my main cooking implements was a game changer for me because they eliminated that problem area. When I had a bit of energy, I cooked a meal from the microwave recipe book and gradually learnt how cooking with a microwave (as against heating up) differed from conventional cooking, so now I can cook most things in a microwave. Of course, its biggest down side is the absence of browning - that's where the sandwich press comes in.  This also means our energy bills are lower because we are using more energy efficient cooking methods.

I'm sure you've seen my chicken stock recipe - which again, eliminates having a stove top going for more than a few minutes, and you will note that it doesn't involve much cutting (the onion gets cut three times - and that's if I'm feeling like it - and not peeled). I grow most of my vegetables and all our fruit, so I preserve or freeze them after having cut them to appropriate sizes, which eliminates doing that work when I am not feeling up to it.

Anatidae V

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #42 on: December 16, 2017, 04:52:18 AM »
I am lucky that I'm not in any way sensitive to dairy, because it's been the one thing that's managed to get some calories (and protein, fat, and carbs) into me when I had next to zero spoons.

For the first month after my brain surgery, I consumed almost nothing but whole milk, about 1/2 gallon a day. It had almost no flavor (good, because everything including water tasted Wrong), kept me full, had no smell, and I could get it myself (walking to the kitchen, pouring the milk, and walking back to the bed/sofa was literally the maximum I was capable of doing).

I still drink a glass of it for breakfast, and sometimes another for dinner. I am slowly getting spoons back, but still usually only eat one time per day, and it's usually leftovers from a restaurant meal or take-out food. I cook something simple about once every two weeks when I suddenly find myself with an almost normal supply of spoons.

It's not ideal, but I'm alive.
Dairy is amazing. I had to eliminate it from my diet a few months ago (temporary) and it's definitely hard to find something that hits as many nutrients and is as easy for me to eat over and over.

Anatidae V

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #43 on: December 17, 2017, 04:06:05 AM »
Despite being summer, it is cold, wet and stormy outside, and we are sick. I though of this thread, and instead of getting Macca's delivered (tempting for the calorie hit), I fried 2 eggs and stuck them in my leftover potato soup. That requires leftover soup, but I'm pretty sure I have a tin of tomato soup for tomorrow's dinner.

Flyingkea

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #44 on: December 17, 2017, 05:14:09 AM »
Despite being summer, it is cold, wet and stormy outside, and we are sick. I though of this thread, and instead of getting Macca's delivered (tempting for the calorie hit), I fried 2 eggs and stuck them in my leftover potato soup. That requires leftover soup, but I'm pretty sure I have a tin of tomato soup for tomorrow's dinner.
We had a left overs night too. Had some left over mince mixture (what we called in growing up, think it might also be known as chil, so nuked that, added some tomato, canned beetroot, grated cheese and lettuce to a tortilla. Nice and filling.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #45 on: December 17, 2017, 12:14:26 PM »
I abandon standard meal definitions.  Some old cheddar and a prepped veg like raw baby carrots straight from the bag. Also a protein powder you like, add a scoop of it, some milk/cream/equivalent nondairy in a blender, pulse and drink.  My basic requirements are no cooking required, no more than 2 minutes standing up, fairly non-spillable.

Astatine

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #46 on: December 18, 2017, 12:58:38 AM »
I've just remembered another one!

Get a couple of small to medium potatoes. Prick the skins a few times with a fork. Nuke in the microwave until soft/cooked. Then add plain yoghurt (or sour cream if you have it) and maybe a small tin of tuna. Eat.

Sadly I can't eat this one any more because I made the mistake of eating plain microwaved potatoes in their skins (no tuna) when I was going through chemo. I thought it would be bland enough that I would not develop an aversion. I was wrong. Luckily I can still eat plain boiled potatoes and roast potatoes. ie brains are weird.

Tonight we're having the avocado/tuna/finely chopped red onion and tomato with lemon juice for dinner. Plus some capsicum sticks to eat it with. (DH has been treating his vitamin D deficiency and miraculously our dinners have become a bit more interesting :D I hope it's a genuine trend and not a one-off.)

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #47 on: December 18, 2017, 02:57:06 AM »
Pretty much this.

Flyingkea

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #48 on: December 18, 2017, 03:05:16 AM »
Dammit PDM, now I wants all of that, especially the chicken.

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Re: Aussie: keeping yourself fed when running low on spoons
« Reply #49 on: December 18, 2017, 03:19:02 AM »
Dammit PDM, now I wants all of that, especially the chicken.
+1 yuuuuuum.