Author Topic: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A  (Read 5948 times)

mohawkbrah

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Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« on: August 22, 2015, 09:33:33 AM »
aside from an e5 immigrant visa which would require $500k invested into a regional centre that has high unemployment. Are they any other suitable ways to get a green card?. Getting a job is hard since i don't have any degree that would warrant hiring me over an american citizen (which i just found out is not aloud)

I was thinking of an E2 visa but it's not a pathway to permanent residency. The E2 would be for when i set up a small business in USA which i already have a business plan in mid-creation, a small time gym. I would live off income from investments because i know that most new gyms don't become profitable until at least 3 years (assuming they don't go bankrupt by then)

bsmith

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #1 on: August 22, 2015, 09:42:45 AM »
H-1B visa, if you can work in a high-skill job that is in demand.

http://www.uscis.gov/eir/visa-guide/h-1b-specialty-occupation/h-1b-visa

Paul der Krake

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #2 on: August 22, 2015, 09:49:10 AM »
Without american relatives, all your options suck. Sorry, that's the hard reality. I highly recommend this book to get an idea of the different paths you can take:

http://www.nolo.com/products/us-immigration-made-easy-imez.html

Even as highly qualified employee, there are dozens of obstacles and you are giving up a ton of flexibility.

DrJohn

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #3 on: August 22, 2015, 09:54:23 AM »
Another route is to get a job with a US company in the UK  Demonstrate skills that would be very useful/are in short supply in the US.

Get an intra company transfer (on L1 visa).  If you are lucky very promising as a US based "asset" you might have have the company fund the move to take up a position as an expat in the US (with expat benefits).  Get onto local US payroll as soon as possible so you can participate in 401(k) getting the match and, importantly, their healthcare benefits program.

If you still show promise they might sponsor you for a green card and then permanent residence.

Worked for me and others in my peer group.  That said I had a reasonably unusual skillset/specialty.  Good luck.

DrJohn

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galliver

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2015, 10:39:13 AM »
Not an option now, but you could keep an eye on the diversity Greencard lottery. Looks like UK is on the exemption  list right now but that sometimes changes. Abd then it's still a long shot, but worth having your name in!

Depending on your age and life situation: come over for some kind of schooling (or other valid temporary reason) and (genuinely) find a life partner.

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grantmeaname

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2015, 10:47:50 AM »
Marry an American. You can even do it if your ideal spouse has the same gender as you - remarkable times we live in!

Paul der Krake

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2015, 10:57:44 AM »
Depending on your age and life situation: come over for some kind of schooling (or other valid temporary reason) and (genuinely) find a life partner.
This is what happened to me. We were too young to marry when we met so I hopped from visa to visa for a couple years, eventually ending up on an H-1B, before marrying a few months ago. I had in-demand skills so it was "easier" for me to move here than her move somewhere in Europe.

There's a reason practically everyone you see in the waiting rooms of USCIS offices and embassies is from 3rd world countries. Fewer people from the first world are willing to put up with this crap as they can already live anywhere they want without spending thousands of dollars and man hours to be treated like criminals. If it weren't for my wife I would never in a million years have subjected myself to it.

galliver

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #8 on: August 22, 2015, 11:09:33 AM »
Depending on your age and life situation: come over for some kind of schooling (or other valid temporary reason) and (genuinely) find a life partner.
This is what happened to me. We were too young to marry when we met so I hopped from visa to visa for a couple years, eventually ending up on an H-1B, before marrying a few months ago. I had in-demand skills so it was "easier" for me to move here than her move somewhere in Europe.

There's a reason practically everyone you see in the waiting rooms of USCIS offices and embassies is from 3rd world countries. Fewer people from the first world are willing to put up with this crap as they can already live anywhere they want without spending thousands of dollars and man hours to be treated like criminals. If it weren't for my wife I would never in a million years have subjected myself to it.
I have a few friends that (predictably) fell in love in college, and I think some of them married earlier than they otherwise might have in order to start the clock. One couple just did a "renewal of vows" in classic wedding style, after wooing a few years ago. (I don't think any of them are cheating the system, just not waiting for everything else like money, jobs to fall into place.) 

OP, I thought of another one: my cousin immigrated first to Canada, then to US (though move to US was predicated on a software job). Also it's definitely the long game. But, there you go, for consideration.

Cathy

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #9 on: August 22, 2015, 11:09:42 AM »
...There's a reason practically everyone you see in the waiting rooms of USCIS offices and embassies is from 3rd world countries. Fewer people from the first world are willing to put up with this crap as they can already live anywhere they want without spending thousands of dollars and man hours to be treated like criminals. ...

That may be one reason, but it's not the only one.

Subject to exceptions, "[a] visa is generally not required for Canadian citizens". 8 CFR 212.1(a)(1). Therefore, you generally would not expect to see Canadians in US embassies or consulates, as they are not required to obtain a visa to enter the US, even to work (again, subject to exceptions).

Under USCIS policy, regardless of nationality, persons who adjust status to that of lawful permanent resident based on employment in the US are frequently exempt from having to attend a USCIS office. USCIS Interoffice Memorandum dated January 5, 2005.

Paul der Krake

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #10 on: August 22, 2015, 12:00:44 PM »
I have a few friends that (predictably) fell in love in college, and I think some of them married earlier than they otherwise might have in order to start the clock. One couple just did a "renewal of vows" in classic wedding style, after wooing a few years ago. (I don't think any of them are cheating the system, just not waiting for everything else like money, jobs to fall into place.) 
It's a perverse system. I don't begrudge USCIS for their red tape, they are after all merely enforcing the law, but yeah the lack of options forces people's hands. My home country exchanges tens of thousands of their hormone-filled teenagers for tens of thousands of american hormone-filled teenagers, every single year. The two countries have fought alongside in two world wars, have massive overlaps in their popular cultures, and roughly obey the same customs of dating. And each country's accent makes the other's panties drop at speeds pushing the limits of physics. What else do they expect to happen?

...There's a reason practically everyone you see in the waiting rooms of USCIS offices and embassies is from 3rd world countries. Fewer people from the first world are willing to put up with this crap as they can already live anywhere they want without spending thousands of dollars and man hours to be treated like criminals. ...

That may be one reason, but it's not the only one.

Subject to exceptions, "[a] visa is generally not required for Canadian citizens". 8 CFR 212.1(a)(1). Therefore, you generally would not expect to see Canadians in US embassies or consulates, as they are not required to obtain a visa to enter the US, even to work (again, subject to exceptions).

Under USCIS policy, regardless of nationality, persons who adjust status to that of lawful permanent resident based on employment in the US are frequently exempt from having to attend a USCIS office. USCIS Interoffice Memorandum dated January 5, 2005.
Yeah, I was being hyperbolic, there are of course many reasons why white people are outnumbered in US embassies even in 1st world countries. Another one is that my mother doesn't need to go sit at the US embassy in London to come visit me, whereas the pakistani mother who lives in London doesn't qualify for ESTA if she wants to visit her son who's studying abroad. Unfortunately, USCIS doesn't keep stats on the people who don't apply, but I have heard many stories of people who opted out and chose to set up shop elsewhere because of the notorious hassle of dealing with US immigration.

mrshudson

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #11 on: August 22, 2015, 02:12:15 PM »
OP, as many have pointed out here, this is not going to be easy. Also, ask yourselves long and hard exactly why you want to immigrate to the US. The immigration process is costly, bureaucratic, and inflexible.

DrJohn

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #12 on: August 22, 2015, 03:09:14 PM »
OP, as many have pointed out here, this is not going to be easy. Also, ask yourselves long and hard exactly why you want to immigrate to the US. The immigration process is costly, bureaucratic, and inflexible.

Also, remember that you will have to continue to file tax returns to the US.  For life.  This includes paying taxes even if you do not live there (subject to a Foreign Earned Income Exclusion and dual taxation agreements https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/411900/usa-consolidated.pdf).  Unless you later give up US citizenship- don't even go there if you have significant wealth...http://www.irs.gov/Individuals/International-Taxpayers/Expatriation-Tax

Sailor Sam

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #13 on: August 22, 2015, 05:34:29 PM »
You could join the US Armed Forces. Per section 328 and 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, active duty enlistees may immediately petition for American citizenship, rather than wait the five years normally required. You can be granted citizenship in as little as 3 months, though I'd say 6 months is the true reality. Minimum enlistments are 2 years.

If you're truly 19, as your age thinmabob says, you could probably figure out a way to attend one of the US Service Academies. There are 5 to choose from and they are free, which is pretty damn mustacheian. I can't swear to other schools, but Annapolis gives a great education. This route would take 4.5 years, since you'd have to graduate and get your commission before you could be sworn in as a citizen.

Hope this helped. The military isn't a route for everyone, but it's a fast-track to citizenship that many people don't know about.

Letj

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #14 on: August 22, 2015, 05:43:06 PM »
aside from an e5 immigrant visa which would require $500k invested into a regional centre that has high unemployment. Are they any other suitable ways to get a green card?. Getting a job is hard since i don't have any degree that would warrant hiring me over an american citizen (which i just found out is not aloud)

I was thinking of an E2 visa but it's not a pathway to permanent residency. The E2 would be for when i set up a small business in USA which i already have a business plan in mid-creation, a small time gym. I would live off income from investments because i know that most new gyms don't become profitable until at least 3 years (assuming they don't go bankrupt by then)

Find an American to love and get married.

daverobev

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #15 on: August 22, 2015, 05:57:33 PM »
Any good reason to do it? Grass is always greener - well, no, it's just different.

Take it from a Brit living in Canada - some things will be better, some worse, but mostly they'll be different. And different takes a while to get used to.

Either way, get an Amex at home, you will be able to do a global transfer if you move.

Good luck.

fa

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #16 on: August 22, 2015, 06:32:33 PM »
you could probably figure out a way to attend one of the US Service Academies. There are 5 to choose from and they are free, which is pretty damn mustacheian. I can't swear to other schools, but Annapolis gives a great education.

Indeed all the academies offer a superb education for free.  They are extremely competitive to get into.  It would probably be easier to get into Harvard or Stanford.  Simply enlisting in the US military is a whole lot easier and does facilitate the path to citizenship.

Ocelot

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2015, 01:55:55 AM »
I'm mid-process on a K1 visa to join my US-born fiancee - we met here in NZ, she's already over there and I'll hopefully be with her by the end of the year. Although we're in a genuine relationship, we've done a lot of research to find the easiest/most cost-effective option to get me over legally as the official marriage route requires us to either be apart for most of the 12-18 months it usually takes, or me to be in the US but not able to legally work for the entire process.
We came to the conclusion that doing it "by the book" was the only real option. I got through to the interview stage of the Diversity Visa but the process stalled there and eventually timed out (this was earlier in our relationship before we became engaged). The other options all require either a lot of capital to invest (enough to FIRE imo) or working in an approved industry at an approved level according to the official charts (Spoiler: Unless you're a rocket scientist you're probably out of luck).

You can see why marriages of convenience are the classic solution to this problem. The forms you fill out even have sections to accommodate companies that assist you to find a US partner, and a section to list all the previous fiance/es you've brought over, so it's even ingrained in the paperwork. You do still have to provide quite a lot of proof of your ongoing relationship although who knows how much they really look into it.

MrsPete

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2015, 12:27:17 PM »
You could join the US Armed Forces. Per section 328 and 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, active duty enlistees may immediately petition for American citizenship, rather than wait the five years normally required. You can be granted citizenship in as little as 3 months, though I'd say 6 months is the true reality. Minimum enlistments are 2 years.

If you're truly 19, as your age thinmabob says, you could probably figure out a way to attend one of the US Service Academies. There are 5 to choose from and they are free, which is pretty damn mustacheian. I can't swear to other schools, but Annapolis gives a great education. This route would take 4.5 years, since you'd have to graduate and get your commission before you could be sworn in as a citizen.

Hope this helped. The military isn't a route for everyone, but it's a fast-track to citizenship that many people don't know about.
I hadn't realized that joining the military could open doors to citizenship, but it makes sense -- for the right person. 

However, I wouldn't count on a new immigrant gaining admission to one of the service academies.  Admission to these academies is incredibly selective (I've known a few students over the years who've been admitted, and they are all above-incredible human beings -- top grades, top physical condition, loads of leadership experience, incredible drive), and I'm pretty sure you need a recommendation from your state senator.  I don't know why a senator would recommend a non-American when so many of "his own people" want these limited slots. 

mohawkbrah

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2015, 12:36:21 PM »
You could join the US Armed Forces. Per section 328 and 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, active duty enlistees may immediately petition for American citizenship, rather than wait the five years normally required. You can be granted citizenship in as little as 3 months, though I'd say 6 months is the true reality. Minimum enlistments are 2 years.

If you're truly 19, as your age thinmabob says, you could probably figure out a way to attend one of the US Service Academies. There are 5 to choose from and they are free, which is pretty damn mustacheian. I can't swear to other schools, but Annapolis gives a great education. This route would take 4.5 years, since you'd have to graduate and get your commission before you could be sworn in as a citizen.

Hope this helped. The military isn't a route for everyone, but it's a fast-track to citizenship that many people don't know about.

i just read about this on google. to be eligible id have to be residing in USA already and be in possession of a greencard. so no go for me. the military path is for naturalization towards citizenship and not permanent residancy

CanuckExpat

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2015, 12:49:22 PM »
Is there a reason you want a green card specifically? It sounds like you have investment income and don't need a job. You could maintain a residence in the UK to prove you have ties (and really still rent out the UK residence if you want, or just need a mailing address in the UK) and visit the US for relatively long periods of time. If you want to start a business in the US, you don't need a green card, and there are other options for entrepreneurs (the O1 visa comes to mind).

If you do want a green card, and you think you have the requisite skills you can self petition for an EB1 visa (this is kind of a long shot.. if you have a nobel prize it will be no problem, but it also extends to non nobel prize winners)

Similarly, and I think a little more obtainable, you can petition for an National Interest Waiver (NIW) without a job, which would allow you to get a green card under EB2 categorization.

People tend to think the EB1 and EB2/NIW path are only for PhDs, that helps, but it can be done with a broad range of skills, Opera singer for example. I can't speak about the success rate, and probably best to work with a lawyer, but expensive.

More information on self petition here: http://www.uscis.gov/green-card/green-card-through-job/green-card-through-self-petition

Sailor Sam

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2015, 02:32:29 PM »
i just read about this on google. to be eligible id have to be residing in USA already and be in possession of a greencard. so no go for me. the military path is for naturalization towards citizenship and not permanent residancy

Oops, apologies. For some reason I read your post as wanting citizenship, and not naturalization. Military enlistment might get a greencard, but you'd probably have to be extremely desirable for some reason. Are you perhaps a very low ranking prince of an extended and argumentative principality? Actual and literal rocket scientists..?

However, I wouldn't count on a new immigrant gaining admission to one of the service academies.  Admission to these academies is incredibly selective (I've known a few students over the years who've been admitted, and they are all above-incredible human beings -- top grades, top physical condition, loads of leadership experience, incredible drive), and I'm pretty sure you need a recommendation from your state senator.  I don't know why a senator would recommend a non-American when so many of "his own people" want these limited slots. 


Aye, there's the rub. I was envisioning Mr mohawkbrah using some sort of international exchange, and not state referral. I did enjoy the super human description, though!  I'm sure it will make Nords preen his tail feathers.

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2015, 02:39:46 PM »
You could join the US Armed Forces. Per section 328 and 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, active duty enlistees may immediately petition for American citizenship, rather than wait the five years normally required. You can be granted citizenship in as little as 3 months, though I'd say 6 months is the true reality. Minimum enlistments are 2 years.

If you're truly 19, as your age thinmabob says, you could probably figure out a way to attend one of the US Service Academies. There are 5 to choose from and they are free, which is pretty damn mustacheian. I can't swear to other schools, but Annapolis gives a great education. This route would take 4.5 years, since you'd have to graduate and get your commission before you could be sworn in as a citizen.

Hope this helped. The military isn't a route for everyone, but it's a fast-track to citizenship that many people don't know about.

Would attending any other american university and going the ROTC route work?

Because getting into those service academies is insanely difficult.

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #23 on: August 24, 2015, 09:47:52 AM »
Hey, Brit expat checking in. I did it the H1-B route, but I think if I were you, I'd apply for a US university and get a student visa. I'm not sure if you can get a student visa if you go to a Community College but that'd be the way to start off for as low costs as you possibly can. If not, a public "State" university may be cheaper than a private college. If you could attend a community college, after a couple of years doing the initial courses there (Americans have to do general education classes in college no matter what they end up studying, so you may as well knock those out cheaply), you could presumably qualify for resident tuition rates, which would help keep the costs down for going on to a bigger university. Or you could stop there with an Associates Degree.  Then once you have a degree, there's more of a chance of getting a job locally and switching to a work visa like H1-B, and from there to green card. Or marrying an American citizen.

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Re: Assistance on Brit wanting to emigrate to the U. S. of A
« Reply #24 on: August 29, 2015, 02:51:53 PM »
You could join the US Armed Forces. Per section 328 and 329 of the Immigration and Nationality Act, active duty enlistees may immediately petition for American citizenship, rather than wait the five years normally required. You can be granted citizenship in as little as 3 months, though I'd say 6 months is the true reality. Minimum enlistments are 2 years.

If you're truly 19, as your age thinmabob says, you could probably figure out a way to attend one of the US Service Academies. There are 5 to choose from and they are free, which is pretty damn mustacheian. I can't swear to other schools, but Annapolis gives a great education. This route would take 4.5 years, since you'd have to graduate and get your commission before you could be sworn in as a citizen.

Hope this helped. The military isn't a route for everyone, but it's a fast-track to citizenship that many people don't know about.

Indeed all the academies offer a superb education for free.  They are extremely competitive to get into.  It would probably be easier to get into Harvard or Stanford.  Simply enlisting in the US military is a whole lot easier and does facilitate the path to citizenship.
I hadn't realized that joining the military could open doors to citizenship, but it makes sense -- for the right person. 

However, I wouldn't count on a new immigrant gaining admission to one of the service academies.  Admission to these academies is incredibly selective (I've known a few students over the years who've been admitted, and they are all above-incredible human beings -- top grades, top physical condition, loads of leadership experience, incredible drive), and I'm pretty sure you need a recommendation from your state senator.  I don't know why a senator would recommend a non-American when so many of "his own people" want these limited slots.

Would attending any other american university and going the ROTC route work?

Because getting into those service academies is insanely difficult.

Aye, there's the rub. I was envisioning Mr mohawkbrah using some sort of international exchange, and not state referral. I did enjoy the super human description, though!  I'm sure it will make Nords preen his tail feathers.

I realize that the OP has already pointed out that the military is not the preferred option.  About the only way for a foreign citizen to join the U.S. military (before having a green card) would be to possess a critical skill in languages or the medical field.  During the drawdown, I'd be skeptical that would work. 

There's some controversy over how the colleges count their "applicants"-- whether they actually filled out an entire application or just attended a summer sports camp.  But by the math used at the service academies (as controversial as that applicant math may be) they're currently harder to get into than Harvard... at least via the Congressional appointment route.

It's still easier to get into a service academy via a Presidential appointment, if you benefit from the parental lottery.  These are generally reserved for the children of service-academy alumni who are KIAs, POWs, and retirees.  It's also easier to get into the service academies by applying from the enlisted ranks, although if you're turned down for an enlisted appointment then you're still enlisted and have to consider other college options while waiting another year.  It's easier to get into USNA via the nuclear-power training pipeline (snarkily called "Academy Prep") although again if you don't make the cut during nuclear power training then you're gonna end up on an aircraft carrier or a submarine.  And finally it's "easier" to get into a service academy via the NCAA-- especially a big-bucks sport like football, basketball, baseball, track, swimming, or soccer.  But that is still a very difficult road, and it's a real challenge to maintain your overall performance while you're in a varsity sport.

While I appreciate the "superhuman" characterization, it's still possible to get into a service academy with merely good grades and good SATs while having absolutely no idea what you're getting into-- other than admiring how cool your best friend's older brother makes it look.  After you show up to take the oath, the only remaining skills you need are persistence and stubborness.  The helpful upperclass will tutor you on the rest.  Let's not get into how I learned that. 

If you already have skills in time management, studying, and self-discipline then I personally feel that you'd get more out of ROTC at a civilian university.  But if you're the type of student who'd party your way out of college before Christmas break, then a service academy will definitely provide you with the framework to set you up for success.