Author Topic: What are some Mustachian-friendly hobbies/interests that you guys have?  (Read 8677 times)

brokeresident

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I have an abundance of free time during the next month until I start residency, and since graduating many of my friends from medical school have moved out of town. To fill the time I'm trying to find some Mustache-friendly things to do and wanted to see what you all like.

icefr

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Reading library books! Learning how to cook is fun too, except when it doesn't quite work out.

EK

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Reading, posting on Internet forums, board games, crafts, taking care of little projects around the house, trying new recipes, practice a new language on duo lingo, outdoor stuff- walking, hiking, biking, practice an instrument, listen to music, visit with friends and relatives, play with my pets, draw, do yardwork, baking, go to the library...

That's just some of my favorites!

KimPossible

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I'd advise you to sleep.  Although you can't really bank sleep, soon you're going to miss it!

(Although I did residency in the bad old days before the 80 hour work week, so my advice may be dated...)

mustachianteacher

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Hiking! Soak up as much of the outdoors as you possibly can. All you need are shoes and a water bottle. :-)

FlorenceMcGillicutty

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Anything that makes you truly happy, right? 

RedMaple

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Perhaps I'm lame to suggest it... but review your budget and see how you can improve it. Do lots of research/read books on improving your overall finances just because you will be too busy to do it later on. (Cooking, retirement, investment)

Also, organize/clean your entire apartment, make an inventory list of all of your belonging including clothes, shoes, toilet paper, electronics, what is in the kitchen cupboard, freezer... everything. Using that list create meal ideas, and/or outfit ideas. So you'll know in advance when to start looking out for sales, or if you're shopping, automatically know if/how it will fit in your current wardrobe/if you really need it. Donate/sell the things you don't need, if you get robbed you'll know exactly what is missing, you will recognize mistakes from previous shopping experiences and hopefully learn from them. Also collect all of your important documents in one place (warranties, birth certificate, ss card, completed loan payments, tax returns, current loans etc) - perhaps open a safe box at the banque.

I've been doing this the last 6 months; it's a really big job; but it is very rewarding. I'm a math person and I can easily quantify the difference this has made in my life. I still have a way to go, but being clutter free feels like a weight has been lifted off my shoulders.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2013, 09:46:47 PM by RedMaple »

MountainFlower

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I think that RedMaple is on the right track. Spend some time getting everything in order.

I'd cook meals for your freezer as well. 

To answer your question, we hike. 

KimPossible

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RedMaple's idea is great.  Make sure to start a file for diplomas, certificates, and licenses, and make some copies of your med school diploma to put in there.  Each time you finish part of your training (internship, residency, fellowship, etc.) or get a new license or the like, make copies and put them into the file.

When you start applying for privileges, you'll thank me :)

cosmie

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Hiking! Soak up as much of the outdoors as you possibly can. All you need are shoes and a water bottle. :-)
Comfy, supportive shoes! My feet, ankles, and knees are still hating me for not realizing what comfy and supportive truly meant.

Frankly, enjoy yourself! If that's soaking in nature, organizing other aspects of your life, seeking quiet Zen, sleeping it away, or partying. Once your residency starts, your definition of free time will drastically change, and the thought of an abundance will be a long forgotten dream.

Ozstache

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Walking my dogs, reading library books, photography with basic equipment, watching DVDs accumulated in less Mustachian times, free online learning resources, attending local house auctions (with hands firmly in pockets), riding our old bikes around, surfing the net, watching recorded TV shows and skipping through the ads, value shopping on behalf of non-mustashian family members and friends (ie. with their money), spruiking the virtues of Mustachianism to anyone that will listen.

happy

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Walking, hiking, swimming, spending time at the beach, reading, reading/researching stuff on the internet and blogs, gardening and vege growing, low cost homemaking/lifestyle stuff eg baking bread, cooking, collecting and chopping wood for winter heating, time with family.

Personally I wouldn't waste my last month before residency "getting organised"...I'd spend it doing stuff I enjoy, especially things that might take time eg a 4 week trip which could be done cheaply by hiking/biking/car camping. Last chance to be free for a while. OR if you want to build or make something that will take a few weeks of uninterrupted time.

brokeresident

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RedMaple's idea is great.  Make sure to start a file for diplomas, certificates, and licenses, and make some copies of your med school diploma to put in there.  Each time you finish part of your training (internship, residency, fellowship, etc.) or get a new license or the like, make copies and put them into the file.

When you start applying for privileges, you'll thank me :)

Just made a dozen copies of my medical diploma :)

I like the idea of a separate file for diplomas, certificates, etc. Currently I just have a "Medical School" folder with my USMLE score reports and "ERAS" folder for my residency application documents.

Reepekg

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I like refereeing youth soccer games. It provides:
1. Surprisingly high income ($40-50/hr)
2. Good exercise
3. An excuse to be outside in the sun/grass
4. A chance to be around kids having fun if you do the younger ages
5. The entertainment of watching a game
6. The flexibility of choosing when to work an hour here or there

« Last Edit: May 22, 2013, 09:36:50 AM by Reepekg »

jrhampt

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Strongly support the library suggestions, and this may be the last chance you get to do some pleasure reading for a while.  Having just finished grad school, I went to the library yesterday and found to my surprise and delight that some of my favorite authors have new books out: for example, Guy Gavriel Kay and Patricia McKillip.  I plan on spending some quality library book time in my hammock. 

little_owl

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Gardening, rock climbing, motorcycles, reading, WINE! (yes, it can be a hobby), hiking, and working with several volunteer organizations!

bogart

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If you own a car, in your shoes (car) I'd be tempted to load up and drive around the country for 3.5 weeks, staying in state/national campgrounds and enjoying the scenery and activities.  But I'm funny that way.  Failing that, the hiking/biking ideas seem good to me.  There are also a lot of free or low-cost outdoor concerts (and some movies) around where I live that can be fun in summer time.

RedMaple

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Walking, hiking, swimming, spending time at the beach, reading, reading/researching stuff on the internet and blogs, gardening and vege growing, low cost homemaking/lifestyle stuff eg baking bread, cooking, collecting and chopping wood for winter heating, time with family.

Personally I wouldn't waste my last month before residency "getting organised"...I'd spend it doing stuff I enjoy, especially things that might take time eg a 4 week trip which could be done cheaply by hiking/biking/car camping. Last chance to be free for a while. OR if you want to build or make something that will take a few weeks of uninterrupted time.

Regarding getting organized, I don't blame you; but you have to start some time, otherwise you will never find the time to do it and it will never get done.

Tyler

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A good video game can be extremely fun at very little cost. Just avoid ones with monthly fees.

I also like art. Painting can get expensive if you let it, but if you learn to make your own canvases and mix your own colors you can keep your costs down. Or to start, just buy a large pad of paper and a box of colored pastels and sit outside drawing nature.

hybrid

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Eurogaming (my icon is a Settlers of Catan board, the grandaddy of Eurogames) online and face to face (face to face preferred, with buddies, with good beer) and disc golfing.

As opposed to traditional golf, which I also really like and is the exact opposite.

acanthurus

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Photography. Just remember it is NOT about the gear, it's about how you see. Go grab some old Nikon digital SLR like a used D70 for $150, an old 50mm prime for $50, and go take pictures better than someone who dropped thousands of dollars in gear but doesn't understand composition. If you get bored, sell the gear for about what you paid.

Megatron

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Rock climbing (outdoors). It can cost you a bit to get started for gears but you are good for many many years to come.

Nudelkopf

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Walking & playing trumpet.

The walking is free, and the trumpet only cost $50.

Arbor33

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Volunteer! Go do some volunteer work and make new friends.

Everyone's had some great advice otherwise. Hike, read, organize your life, etc. All awesome ideas!

Other ideas:
Take a little road trip on your bike.
Go camping.
Check with your town/library/other about community events.
Have a BBQ where everyone brings a dish.
Organize a pickup game of <sport> in a nearby park.
Find some pastime you can monetize.
Try to make something that takes care of a need you have.
Figure out how to do something you've been paying others to do.
Go fishing.

Lans Holman

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I'm a big fan of swimming in rivers and lakes, at least during nice weather.  Free, great exercise, so much fun.
Lately I've been getting more and more into listening to music, which I don't think most people think of as an activity in and of itself.  I'm just finding that some music is best appreciated by giving it your full attention, and every once in a while it's nice to sit down and do just that, with a good set of headphones.

smalllife

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Learning - I challenged myself to only check out non-fiction from the library and have been enjoying myself quite a bit
Needlework can be very inexpensive - time consuming, beautiful, and you have a priceless piece of art when you are done (I choose designs with meaning, and the intricate ones take so long that you associate part of your life with them.  As someone that doesn't do keepsakes, they mean a lot).
Walking - If your neighborhood is conducive, exploring everything within a mile or two radius could be a hobby that lasts months.  I try and take a walk every other week or two and admire the variety of architecture, etc.

deltaecho

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my favorite free things are bike riding and reading library books.

if I was getting ready for residency again, I would learn a bunch of relaxation exercises and yoga techniques on the web (as long as you're conservative about the recommendations so you don't get injured).  I don't remember what I did before residency, but I probably studied unnecessarily.  you might look at this blog for some interesting recommendations on being productive:http://calnewport.com/blog/

mindaugas

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Cycling, because it feeds my desire to commute by bike.