Author Topic: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?  (Read 5469 times)

asauer

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nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« on: October 14, 2015, 06:58:07 AM »
Network selling via Rodan and Fields has spread like wildfire in my (very large) neighborhood.  I have no interest in buying this stuff.  I also object to being invited to people's homes who have NEVER invited me over socially.  I get 2-4 of these invites per week.  I'm trying to find a polite but firm way of saying 'no'.  So far, I've just said some variation of: "Thanks for thinking of me.  I generally don't participate in this type of sales but I hope we can get together socially soon."  Has anyone else had this experience?  What did you say?

acroy

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2015, 07:47:51 AM »
Hahaha! Multi-level marketing. What a scam!
Firm but polite "No thanks". If you want to be pointed: "I prefer not to participate in pyramid schemes." hehehe.

Mr. Green

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2015, 08:24:41 AM »
What you're already saying sounds polite and firm to me.

Bob W

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2015, 08:41:00 AM »
Your reply was nice enough but I'm not sure why you would want to get together socially with these folks.   I guess people just need some social contact.  These "parties" have been around forever -- Tupperwear,  Pampered Chef,  Lingerie,  Cosmetics, Soap, Home Décor,  whatever.   They are all scammy as hell. 

FLBiker

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2015, 08:49:47 AM »
Ha, that's awesome!  My wife went to a bag party once, but that's only one I've heard of.  I had no idea these were so common.

We once hosted a potluck w/ a presentation about the local timebank.  Maybe folks felt the same way about that...

The_path_less_taken

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2015, 09:19:36 AM »
"Thank you for the invite. I am unable to attend."

If they press, I'd say "Because I have no interest in buying any of that. Why waste your time, and mine?"

Easye418

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2015, 09:25:43 AM »
Return the favor of rudeness..... accept the invite, eat/drink their food/liquor (if available), and buy NOTHING.  The invites will stop quickly.

But in all reality, say "thanks but no thanks, I don't need anything from Rodan and Fields."

Catbert

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2015, 11:41:10 AM »
Think of this as a sales pitch/ad rather than an "invitation".  If they ask verbally give a short "No thanks" answer as others have suggested.  If you get it via Facebook, e-mail, flier, text, etc. then ignore it as you would any unsolicited sales pitch.

Noodle

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2015, 12:22:46 PM »
There's nothing wrong with saying, "I'm so sorry, I can't attend." People always want to explain their no's and that's where you inadvertently step on toes. I wouldn't make any kind of statement about the type of occasion.

AZDude

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2015, 12:36:45 PM »
Much nicer than I would have been in the same situation. This is a salesman with an unsolicited sales call. Say "No thanks", and that is the end of it. If it is legitimate friends/family, then be nicer.

Jack

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2015, 01:11:43 PM »
Politeness is overrated. I suggest going with "HA HA, NOPE!"

If the invite is via Facebook, use an image macro:

purple monkey

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2015, 01:12:13 PM »
Return the favor of rudeness..... accept the invite, eat/drink their food/liquor (if available), and buy NOTHING.  The invites will stop quickly.

But in all reality, say "thanks but no thanks, I don't need anything from Rodan and Fields."

+1

snuggler

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #12 on: October 15, 2015, 10:20:52 AM »
Think of this as a sales pitch/ad rather than an "invitation".  If they ask verbally give a short "No thanks" answer as others have suggested.  If you get it via Facebook, e-mail, flier, text, etc. then ignore it as you would any unsolicited sales pitch.

This. I completely ignore these invites if they are from people who have never invited me to any other social activity. Rude invitations do not require a reply.

The worst, however, is when people invite you to a party, without any indication that it is not just a normal get-together, and then when you show up you find out it is a Rodan + Fields / Jamberry Nails / MLM Scam of the Month party.

irishbear99

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #13 on: October 15, 2015, 10:30:33 AM »
If you want to have a little fun, you can borrow one of my favorites (from Friends). In the sweetest, most regretful voice you can manage, say, "Oh, I wish I could, but I don't want to."

It confuses the hell out of people the first time they hear it. :)

elaine amj

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2015, 11:28:28 AM »
it's hard when someone is pushy. A very, very nice woman I met recently (who I will typically only see for about 2 weeks every year) does one of those wrinkle cream things. So she is now on my FB and and I constantly get asked to attend presentations. I have absolutely no interest in wrinkle creams, even if it did change her life.

MacGyverIt

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Re: nice way to tell someone to take a hike?
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2015, 04:09:33 PM »
Why expend so many pleasantries to neighbors who've not given you the time of day until there is money to be made? These people aren't your friends, they don't care about you, they only want to make money off of you.

Don't expend time and mental/emotional energy concerned about these non-friend's feelings and approval.

Don't go and drink/eat up. They serve cheap crap at these gatherings and if you are gentle enough a soul to be concerned about saying "no" nicely then you'll likely be gentle enough a soul to succumb to the "you drank some punch, therefore feeling guilty enough to buy this useless candle/house cleaning/whatever set." (NO judgment --- I was just like this years ago, I totally get it.)

You don't owe them a response. You certainly don't owe them an explanation. And you don't owe them a "thanks" if you do respond -- a simple "no" will suffice. There's no reason to "thank" them for being a consumer sucka annoyance.

Decide to practice being assertive with these people who aren't your friends and only want your money and, as one or two previous posts mention, respond with, "No, I don't like pyramid schemes. Remove me from this distro list."

What is the worst that will happen, they'll stop pretending to like you only when sending their fake friend invites?

I've been down this road and although tough at first, you'll find it is liberating to firmly draw your boundaries and no longer deal with this consumerist, make money off of your "friends" b.s. These so-called neighbors/friends are the perfect place to start your road to ending the "pleaser" mentality. (http://absoluteconfidence.com/confidence-resources/confidence-articles/people-pleasers-the-price-for-being-too-nice)
« Last Edit: October 15, 2015, 04:14:17 PM by MacGyverIt »