Author Topic: One kitchen knife to rule them all, or two or three...?  (Read 6151 times)

nereo

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Re: One kitchen knife to rule them all, or two or three...?
« Reply #50 on: November 23, 2017, 08:21:13 AM »
My guess is that a tomato is "best" cut by a knife with serrations, and a large roast by a long meat knife, fillet fish with a thin delicate boning knife, etc.   Or,  you could just chop at everything with a 6" chef's knife and be relatively successful.

When any of my knives can no longer make easy cuts through a ripe tomato without significant downward pressure, that's how I know it's time to sharpen them.  You absolutely don't need serrations.
Agreed.  Serrated knives tear more than cut.  A ripe tomato is a great benchmark for determining whether your knife is sharp or not.  Getting back to the thread subject, a single sharp chef's knife can outclass a drawer full of knives of mediocre sharpness.

Mikila

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Re: One kitchen knife to rule them all, or two or three...?
« Reply #51 on: November 23, 2017, 08:44:54 AM »
All our best knives are carbon steel.  They maintain a sharper edge than stainless steel.  Three knives are all I need 95% of the time (the other 5% would be be bread-slicing).  If I had to buy new knives tomorrow, I would buy from Opinel.
A paring knife, a small knife for cutting vegetables in-hand, and a large knife for chopping chicken off the bone or large vegetables like butternut squash are my go-to knives.

Paring knife    https://www.opinel-usa.com/kitchen/small-kitchen-knives/paring-knives/set-2-paring-knives-n102-carbon

We sharpen our knives via whetstone and drystone every week or so and slice through all the tomatoes on the first try every time. 



Goldielocks

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Re: One kitchen knife to rule them all, or two or three...?
« Reply #52 on: November 23, 2017, 01:03:17 PM »
My guess is that a tomato is "best" cut by a knife with serrations, and a large roast by a long meat knife, fillet fish with a thin delicate boning knife, etc.   Or,  you could just chop at everything with a 6" chef's knife and be relatively successful.

When any of my knives can no longer make easy cuts through a ripe tomato without significant downward pressure, that's how I know it's time to sharpen them.  You absolutely don't need serrations.

Oh,  I am not saying you need all these knives,   just taking a stab at what someone else might mean.