Author Topic: Any Mustachian Cruising/Bluewater Sailors, Sailing Families or Wannabes?  (Read 3422 times)

BigBangWeary

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I was just curious to know if there were any other Mustachians on here with cruising (as in sailing) as part of their long term plan? Perhaps you are liveaboard now or have plans to slow travel with your boat or do some longer term bluewater sailing as part of your overall plan or philosophy.

We are a family of 5 who hope to one day cast off, unschool, and do a multi-year slow travel circumnavigation 'a la Sailing Totem'. Just hoping to find some like minded people who aren't casting their financial stability to the wind along with their dock lines.

I would be curious to know how you have married your financial philosophy to your sailing plans.

Fair winds


BigBangWeary

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Bump ...

Doubleh

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I've certainly seen a few other threads taking about boats and sailing, forum search function does not work very well so maybe try searching using Google and including the search term site:mrmoneymustache.com

We're currently living on a canal boat with our 1 about to be 2 daughters while we build up our stache. We may do some cruising on this boat, either here in the uk or the French canals while the kids are small, but ultimately the aim is to go back to a sailing boat and cruise - either a very slow circumnavigation or even just bobbing around in the med or Caribbean.

Sailing is the whole reason I came to FIRE - to be honest if we were going to be living in one place I probably would bother as I could be quite happy with a part time job or lifestyle business, with much less time and effort needed upfront. So to my mind FIRE is a very natural fit to sailing or other slow travel. In fact the first time I ever came across a notion of anything like FIRE was the book 'voyaging on a small income' by Annie Hill. Her approach is very ERE afloat so rather more austere than I want but the example was inspiring and lit the touch paper.

Would love to hear more about your plans and what you've done so far too get there!
« Last Edit: May 02, 2016, 01:59:53 AM by Doubleh »

muckety_muck

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It would be our dream to do exactly what you say - be a liveaboard, spend a year traveling, unschooling, etc. Not sure how we're going to make it happen (trying to reach our net worth goal first, then make plans for what life will look like as FIREes) but it likely won't materialize until 2022. I think the only way I would truly feel comfortable is to start slow (spend a few weeks during the summer traveling in groups with people of a like mind) then meet people at several ports and always know somebody in case of an emergency... since it's so "foreign" to just get up and go to a new place every week or so compared to our normal everyday life experience at the moment.

Looking forward to hearing about your journey to reach this goal! good luck  and will be following... :)

Dusty Dog Ranch

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I was going to recommend Sailing Totem but you already know about that! DH and I went to college with Behan, and it's been pretty fun to watch their adventures. Have you contacted Totem directly? They are very enthusiastic about sharing what they've learned along the way, and have also done at least one post on the financial aspect of their life on the water. Do you have their cruising with kids book?

BigBangWeary

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Dusty Dog Ranch, small world. Yes, I have spoken to Behan by email and have the book Voyaging with Kids that she co-authored. She is a wealth of information. I really admire their accomplishments. Not many long-term cruisers make 8+ years with 3 kids. Well, that's not true. Just few have the time to write about it.

I know that Andy from 59 degrees north Podcast is a fan of Mr Money Mustache and there are a few others like Sailing Simplicity etc. who talk about budgeting.

I think most of the 'Go Simple, Go Small, Go Now' types who do this take a sabbatical or throw caution to the wind and plan to work later in life to make up the lost income. I feel we are different. Our plan is to save hard now and use income from our investments to pay our way. We want to cast off when we are about 40 with kids who will be 5 and 7 by then. Problem might be finding a bluewater boat that doesn't eat the nest egg.

In an ideal world we would start in the Bahamas/Caribbean for a season or two to feel out the life and boat and then make our way through Panama, and do the Puddle Jump. Australia might be the end point, but we dream of doing a full circumnavigation very slowly like Totem.

Muckety_muck it sounds like you have similar aspirations. We have been lucky to have the opportunity to travel a lot (50 countries), even with our kids, and I have to say the world is more hospitable, safe, and easier to navigate than most people think. That said, I would definitely look to be spending months if not years in places. The idea of rushing this to get back to a job, or because we were running low on a sailing kitty is exactly what we hope to avoid. I think it is safer and more fun that way.

Oh, check out Erik Hemingway and his Family Adventure Podcast for some other like-minded cruising families.

Fair winds


BigBangWeary

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Doubleh I will definitely try to get my hands on that book. What are you living/sailing on?

Le Dérisoire

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This is our plan too. We could leave now financially speaking (old boat, low COL countries), but we would rather wait until the kids are actually born and at least 3 years old. The advantage of waiting is that we could have a much nicer boat in 5-6 years and not be restricted to low COL countries. We will be 34-35 years old at that point.

Do you bareboat charter in the meantime or have your own boat? I think owning a boat is a waste if you are working full time, especially since the season here is only 4 months. And bareboat charter is so expensive, even if you go to Lake Champlain or somewhere close. There is a sailing club in my city, but they mostly do day trips and regatta and the owner of the boat is almost always the skipper. What do you guys do to get more experience?

Doubleh

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Sounds like your plans are very similar to ours indeed. And yes I read Behan's voyaging with kids book too, fantastic read with great info. Agree with you about age targets as well, of course this will vary by individual kids. Our eldest is now 3 and I think would be just about old enough to consider taking away long term, although many I have spoken to cite 5 to 7 as a minimum age while others will circumnavigate with a newborn.

The boat we're on now is an English narrow boat style widebeam, basically a steel tube 65' by 12' beam so plenty of space and pretty much as big as a regular 2 bed apartment here in London. Before kids we lived and sailed on a rival 38 heavily built bluewater cruiser. We originally planned to save up just enough and go on the sail now worry later plan you mention, but found after our trial summer sail that we hated the feeling of spending down savings and didn't want to risk waiting too late for kids so decided to get FI first instead.

@ Le Derisoire, for getting sailing practice we sail a lot less now we have a small child, but have taken her out a few times including a week flotilla charter in Greece at 2.5 years old which she loved. Agree that it makes no sense monerarily to own a boat unless you are living on it! Bareboat charter is great but flotillas it club sails are also a great opportunity. Previously we've both done RYA courses and sailed with clubs and on friends boats. I've got some fantastic experience as volunteer crew on a charity boat that provides experiences for underprivileged kids, and also crewed on the ARC on a friend's boat. Once you start to get into sailing opportunities seem to present themselves. If you live anywhere near a sailing club then crewing on round the cans races is a great way to start building experience and meeting like minded individuals.

BigBangWeary

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Re: Any Mustachian Cruising/Bluewater Sailors, Sailing Families or Wannabes?
« Reply #9 on: October 18, 2016, 04:32:00 AM »
Sorry, I was away from MMM. I think we will likely wait until our kids are in the 9-11 range. We want them to remember the adventure, and this will also give us a bigger cruising kitty and boat (Lagoon 440 please ... we can dream). Plus more time to do courses/training.

I think clubs, courses, and friends boats will be the route for us until we are very close to undoing the lines. The cost of bare-boat charters just doesn't seem worth it for us after airfare, etc. Not right now anyways. But as we get closer, then yes.


Johnny Aloha

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Re: Any Mustachian Cruising/Bluewater Sailors, Sailing Families or Wannabes?
« Reply #10 on: October 18, 2016, 04:47:53 AM »
We are onboard (nice pun huh) with this plan too.  In fact, I've become slightly more obsessed the past few months after helping a friend deliver his Jeanneau 54DS from Croatia to Gibraltar.  Wow, that was an amazing boat!

I think most of the 'Go Simple, Go Small, Go Now' types who do this take a sabbatical or throw caution to the wind and plan to work later in life to make up the lost income. I feel we are different. Our plan is to save hard now and use income from our investments to pay our way. We want to cast off when we are about 40 with kids who will be 5 and 7 by then.

This quote also sums up my thoughts ... and our kids are a few years away from really enjoying it.

We don't have circumnavigation dreams, mostly just Great Lakes and east coast cruising with the requisite Caribbean cruise.  But who knows, that may change!

BigBangWeary

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Re: Any Mustachian Cruising/Bluewater Sailors, Sailing Families or Wannabes?
« Reply #11 on: October 19, 2016, 12:48:55 AM »
I see the benefits of both camps (go now, save and go later) and obviously our opinions keep changing as we learn more and develop our strategies. We are pushing out the ages to go mainly based on our hopes that our children will remember more. But there is always that danger of never getting off the dock ...

Oh, the 54DS is a beautiful boat. And Croatia ... one of my favorite spots. Still a bit of a underrated gem.