Author Topic: Affordable Care Act Question on coverage while living in different states  (Read 1798 times)

lakeridge

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Not finding a ton of information on this and wondering how snowbirds or others that split time between states handle ACA insurance coverage?  It looks like all states will be required to have a multi-state insurance option by 2017 if nothing changes but curious as to how it works in practice and details related to cost, administrative difficulties, etc.  Wife and I are early 40's and mostly healthy except one of us has a condition that does require lifetime medication and certain doctor visits that bring our annual costs probably higher than average.  Hoping to both leave fulltime jobs in a couple years and one possible option is to fairly evenly split time between 2 states (some combination of Michigan, Oregon and Arizona is most likely at this point).  Appreciate any information or references anyone might have.

Eric

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Moving is a qualifying event.  Cancel your old insurance and purchase new insurance.  Repeat as necessary.

https://www.healthcare.gov/glossary/qualifying-life-event/


lakeridge

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I'm thinking more along the lines of 1 policy with national coverage as opposed to signing up and canceling insurance twice per year.  Even if possible it doesn't seem that would be the best or most efficient way to go.

teen persuasion

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Following - I'd like to know more.  We've had problems within a state, even, as our college kids are in a nearby city that is apparently not in our network.  Only 30-50 miles away, but not "local".  Frustrating.

Eric

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I'm thinking more along the lines of 1 policy with national coverage as opposed to signing up and canceling insurance twice per year.  Even if possible it doesn't seem that would be the best or most efficient way to go.

No, I'm sure it's not efficient.  Probably a giant pain in the ass.  I'm just not sure there are other options.  (none that I'm aware of).  So let's bump this back up and see if anyone else has ideas.

Axecleaver

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You have three options.
1. Follow Eric's advice and buy two plans depending on where you are living.
2. Buy a plan with out-of-network benefits. Use mail-order pharmacy for the drug benefits which will ship almost anywhere. The out of network benefits tend to be more expensive, but having two plans can be expensive, too, if you have to meet two annual deductibles a year.
3. Buy a plan from a larger insurer (United Healthcare, some of the bigger Blues) with a nationwide provider network. These can be hard to find, and they've been shrinking in recent years as insurance companies put more pressure on thinner provider networks to control costs.

If it were me, I'd go with option 2.

goatmom

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I imagine many people with college kids have to deal with this.  I chose the plan with out of network benefits.  Plan for most visits/procedures when you are in the home state.