Author Topic: Advice to your younger self  (Read 8450 times)

Rimu05

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Advice to your younger self
« on: May 25, 2017, 08:23:58 AM »
This is actually a question I ask on job interviews I go to and I find it is actually one of the more helpful questions you can ask to get good legitimate advise.

So fellow mustachians, I've mentioned previously, I am slap bang in my mid twenties and I want to ask Mustachians here, if you could give the twenty something year old you advise knowing all that you know now, what would that advise be.

It can be related to money or life in general.


zarfus

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2017, 08:27:57 AM »
Elope

plog

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2017, 08:29:13 AM »
If I know past me like I think I do, there's no way that a-hole is listening to anyone's advice.   

AriesFire

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2017, 08:43:29 AM »
I'm only 34, but these are 3 money related things I really wish I did differently in my 20s

1. Advocate for raises and switch jobs if needed- I was very underpaid in my 20s

2. Max out or vastly increase pretax retirement accounts instead of putting in the minimum for the company match

3. Don't be so scared of the stock market- I held onto up to $50k in cash for years before I was comfortable investing

There are many more!

Cwadda

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #4 on: May 25, 2017, 08:46:12 AM »
Quote
1. Advocate for raises and switch jobs if needed- I was very underpaid in my 20s
Can you expand more on this? What field were you in and what got you to finally switch?

Vindicated

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #5 on: May 25, 2017, 08:48:20 AM »
If I could talk to my 18y/o self, I'd say the following.

Military Option:
-Join the Air National Guard right out of HS, and use it's benefits to pay for your future engineering degree.
-Target Officer School for Air Force or Navy, and get in ASAP. 
-Save 70% of your income, since you live for free and eat for free on base.  Don't buy a car worth more than $10k.
-Be picky when finding a SO, but don't be heartbroken if it doesn't work out.  Another will come along.  Find this girl (shows picture of my Wife) and you'll be good to go.
-Stay in contact with your friends, and make more friends.  Make as many friends as possible, because people are lovely.
-Do your 20 years, and retire with a fat pension with more retirement funds than you'll ever need.
-Then become a teacher.

Mostly-Civilian Option:
-Join the Air National Guard right out of HS, and use it's benefits to pay for your future engineering degree.
-Get your engineering degree and get a job you can kick ass at.
-Stay in the Air National Guard for 20 years, so you get a bit of a pension later.
-Save 50%+ of your income.  Don't buy a car worth more than $10k.
-Be picky when finding a SO, but don't be heartbroken  if it doesn't work out.  Another will come along.  Find this girl (shows picture of my Wife) and you'll be good to go.
-Stay in contact with your friends, and make more friends.  Make as many friends as possible, because people are lovely.
-Save enough in investments that you can live off of a teacher's salary, then teach.

Logically, I know I should get back into the Air National Guard, because I'd only need another 14 years to receive a pension worth several thousand a month for life after age 60.  So, if I rejoined now (at age 33), I could fully exit the ANG at 47, and receive the pension at 60.

My Wife doesn't want me to though.  She's worried about me being deployed.

Elope

Also, this.

catccc

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #6 on: May 25, 2017, 08:48:34 AM »
Another vote for maxing out retirement plans.  I skimped a bit with my 401K contributions in my early 20s when there was no match.  I should have put away as much as possible, anyway.  I did max out my IRAs as soon as I started working, though.   

And keep cash savings to a minimum, invest the rest.  I'm still working on that one.

Not financially related advice:  Be comfortable with yourself, be confident, be kind, and rely on yourself for happiness.  Hoping others will bring it to you is a bad idea.  When they do (and they will if you are confident and kind), it will just be icing on the cake!

Tris Prior

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #7 on: May 25, 2017, 08:53:13 AM »
Don't go into journalism; you deserve to earn more than $20k/year (salaried with obscene unpaid OT required!) in a HCOL.

Or, go into journalism but don't get complacent and stay in a low-paying job that will overwork you to death for 5 years. Have an exit strategy.

When your commute sucks, the solution is not to move to a shittier apartment in a shitty suburb, closer to your shitty job that you hate anyway. The solution is to find a better job nearer to home.

Contribute to your damn 401k. It's great that you have a big e-fund! Much of your e-fund will still be intact when you're in your 40s! But it's not earning any interest.

Don't marry that dude.

nobody123

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2017, 08:56:59 AM »
1. Advocate for raises and switch jobs if needed- I was very underpaid in my 20s

This +1000.  You don't get what you deserve, you get what you negotiate.  After I left the job I had right out of college, I found out that people on my team 3 job titles below me were making only about $1500/year less than me.  They would threaten to quit every 6 months and get raises outside of the normal review cycle.  I just assumed my excellent work would be rewarded, like it was in school.  That was an expensive lesson to learn.

AriesFire

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2017, 08:59:54 AM »
Quote
1. Advocate for raises and switch jobs if needed- I was very underpaid in my 20s
Can you expand more on this? What field were you in and what got you to finally switch?

I was working in the accounting department of a mid size private company. I graduated with a finance degree in 2005 and no CPA- was just so happy to get a job that I didn't negotiate anything or really understand how much I was worth. I started in the low 30ks and didn't make much more than 3-5% raises for about 6 years or so.

Almost 12 years later, I am still with the same company, and I make almost 4 times my starting salary. I work in FP&A, actually temporarily running the department!

It was a combination of things that finally got me here, mostly very hard work and some luck - I always took on extra projects, joined all of the company development programs, and showed up to any company events where I could talk to VPs and department heads. I finally got some confidence in my abilities about 4 years ago or so, and I made it clear to my managers that I wanted and needed to advance. I just wish I had that confidence and courage to ask a bit sooner...

Dicey

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #10 on: May 25, 2017, 09:03:22 AM »
Elope
Yup. We did this almost 5 years ago and are still thrilled with the results.

When DH' s daughter got engaged, we gave them the same advice, and they took It! Woo-Hoo!! When they bought their first condo later that year, we rehabbed it for them as a wedding present. Win-win.

After "Elope" is chose your partner carefully, 'cause divorce is expensive.

Save early, save often. The earlier you invest, the fewer dollars it will take to reach your goals.

Don't be afraid of a long, cheap mortgage on a house you can afford.

homestead neohio

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #11 on: May 25, 2017, 09:06:41 AM »
Great topic.

10% in 401k is not enough for fast freedom. 
There is something called a tIRA.
You won't remember fancy vacations.  You can't even remember what you did last week.
Listen to people.  No, you are not.  Really listen to them.
Give your brother the benefit of the doubt. 

Bracken_Joy

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #12 on: May 25, 2017, 09:08:42 AM »
I'm still pretty young (28), but I do still have some advice to my younger (early 20s) self:
-The first serious relationship always lasts too long. When you see the writing on the wall, leave THEN. Don't wait another 2 goddamn years.

-Learn about tax stuff sooner.

-Go to counseling early and often when your brain needs a tuneup. Especially when it's available through student services.

One I have done, and am happy I have:
-You can't buy your health back, and it's easier to never gain the weight than it is to lose it. Always keep nutrition, sleep, and activity as priorities.

catccc

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #13 on: May 25, 2017, 09:09:13 AM »
Quote
1. Advocate for raises and switch jobs if needed- I was very underpaid in my 20s
Can you expand more on this? What field were you in and what got you to finally switch?

I also got lowballed at my first job offer.  I started working in Jan 2003 at an accounting firm.  I took and passed the CPA exam in May of the same year.  (Though the results weren't available until... August?  That seems ridiculous, but it could have been that long).  Anyway, I started that job at $36K w/ a $4K bonus.  I got a raise to $40 the next year and then I left for my second accounting job at $.  That job had offered $45 + $5K bonus, but I asked for $50K.  I should have asked for just $40K at the first job, gotten bumped to $45 a year later.  Who knows, I may have gotten an offer of $50 + $5 at the second job and asked for $55.  I later left for a significant raise at another company that brought my salary up to $70.  But the lesson is, it's never easier to get a raise than right before you start the job.  At my current position, in the last meeting with HR before they made an offer, and when it was apparent to all parties that they wanted me, the HR staff person asked "okay, so let's talk salary... $80?"  I said "I was hoping for $85."  And she simply said "Done!  Expect an offer by COB today!"  It's just so easy.  They don't care about $5K.  Perhaps I could have negotiated even beyond that, but I've always been comfortable asking for $5K off the bat.

skekses

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2017, 09:09:33 AM »
- Processed foods were slowly poisoning me and I had no idea until I stopped eating it and my skin/gut issues cleared up for the first time in my life.
- You don't get to change another person. Accept them as is or spend time with someone else.
- There are so many things I want to learn, I wish I hadn't spent so much time watching TV and playing video games in my younger years as I have nothing to show for that time.
- Try new experiences to figure out what you love. For example, I tried the standard exercises of running and lifting weights, hated every moment of it, and could never stick with any program so I assumed that exercise was not for me. Then I found climbing and everything changed. These days people describe me as "active" or "sporty" which amuses me because my self-image remains a bookish nerdling. 
- Most people, including professionals, are terrible with money. Think critically about all advice. :)

Lady SA

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #15 on: May 25, 2017, 09:31:43 AM »
I am also smack-dab in the middle of my 20's. But I have a few things I want to kick my younger self for:

1. Stop sticking your head in the sand about taxes and figuring out how they work.
2. You qualified for a tIRA for 2 years and didn't even open one you dummy!! Open it and max it out before you can't anymore.
3. Elope. You did a good job being frugal for your wedding, but you would be just as happy and more rich if you had eloped instead.
4. Make DH change jobs sooner, he is being severely underpaid. Get him to change jobs and he will get a 60% salary increase.
5. There will be a huge dustup with your family when someone treats you really, really poorly. Stay calm and step away from the situation. You don't need to stick around to try to fix it while you get stomped on and abused. Say "this doesn't work for me" and leave and then take a nice vacation while everyone else calms down. You will get nasty messages from various loved ones that will be like a kick in the gut. Resist the urge to reply because it just gets worse because people are mad you aren't being a doormat and it escalates beyond belief. Don't give them the opportunity to jump on you. Just stay away for a few weeks and refuse to engage until people can treat you respectfully. Even though you are young, you don't deserve to be treated that way by anyone.
6. Max out your 401k a year earlier instead of throwing money aimlessly toward low-interest debt.

katstache92

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #16 on: May 25, 2017, 10:14:23 AM »
Don't jump to a new job to join a friend.  It turns out she's not your friend and the job isn't great, she's just the favorite.  Then, don't wait around for a year to get the promotion you should have gotten the year before but HR said you didn't have enough experience to get, even though you were ready per your boss, and then you get a new boss who has a new standard for the promotion.

TLDR: Don't stay in a job that makes you miserable.

frugaliknowit

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #17 on: May 25, 2017, 10:17:34 AM »
Invest 50% (or more) of take home pay (preferably tax deferred/tax free).  If you need to, live in "someone's basement" to accomplish this.  By the time you are 40, you will be wealthy and be able to do pretty much what you want.  Do not become a "corporate slave" by succumbing to consumerism.

Dicey

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #18 on: May 25, 2017, 10:35:21 AM »
I am also smack-dab in the middle of my 20's. But I have a few things I want to kick my younger self for:

1. Stop sticking your head in the sand about taxes and figuring out how they work.
2. You qualified for a tIRA for 2 years and didn't even open one you dummy!! Open it and max it out before you can't anymore.
3. Elope. You did a good job being frugal for your wedding, but you would be just as happy and more rich if you had eloped instead.
4. Make DH change jobs sooner, he is being severely underpaid. Get him to change jobs and he will get a 60% salary increase.
5. There will be a huge dustup with your family when someone treats you really, really poorly. Stay calm and step away from the situation. You don't need to stick around to try to fix it while you get stomped on and abused. Say "this doesn't work for me" and leave and then take a nice vacation while everyone else calms down. You will get nasty messages from various loved ones that will be like a kick in the gut. Resist the urge to reply because it just gets worse because people are mad you aren't being a doormat and it escalates beyond belief. Don't give them the opportunity to jump on you. Just stay away for a few weeks and refuse to engage until people can treat you respectfully. Even though you are young, you don't deserve to be treated that way by anyone.
6. Max out your 401k a year earlier instead of throwing money aimlessly toward low-interest debt.
Wow! You sound wise beyond your years, LadyLB. Go, you!

dividendman

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2017, 10:43:25 AM »
1. Interview for new jobs every year whether you're in your dream job or a job that makes you miserable (or anywhere in between)
2. Don't buy: penny stocks, new cars, stocks on margin
3. That person over there who looks happy with fancy things isn't
4. Learn everything you can about personal finance - if you learn some things just a bit earlier it can have a HUGE impact 10 years down the line
5. Stay in control of your own accounts, money, investments, etc.
6. Your parents aren't smarter than you
7. Set goals (1 year, 5 year, 10 year)

Rubyvroom

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2017, 11:11:53 AM »
In no special order...

1. Bite the bullet and get your CPA right out of college because you will literally ~never~ go back to do it.
2. Don't start drinking beer. Admit it, you think beer tastes awful.
3. Refinance sooner. 6.375% was not a good interest rate.
4. Call your grandparents far more often. You miss them dearly when they're gone.
5. Take more time at your wedding to take pictures. They can't start without you.
6. Idiot. You stopped contributing to your 401K in 2008 because, "Every dollar I put in is $0.80 the next day." MAX THAT THANG.
7. Max your Roth too while you're at it. Trust me. You can afford it. You literally have no idea where your money is going.
8. Stress less. (still working on this one)

catccc

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2017, 11:18:08 AM »
- You don't get to change another person. Accept them as is or spend time with someone else.

This one is great!

GreenSheep

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2017, 12:01:11 PM »
1. Elope or have a very cheap backyard wedding with 10 guests, including your brother who is the officiant.
2. Sure, travel to other countries and enjoy them, but also go see the things in your own country that people fly from across the world to see.
3. Realize you're worth more than most people want to pay you, and look for the jobs that pay better.
4. Spend time with your parents. They're not going to be around forever. (I cried when my aunt told me this about my grandparents, who had died by that time, and I now make a point of going to see my parents a lot more often.)
5. Don't worry about what people think of you. There's no need to be an asshole, but realize that you can't please everyone.
6. All the MMM financial stuff.
7. Stop looking for perfection and date that guy whose teeth aren't 100% straight. The rest of him is pretty darn awesome, teeth are fixable, and he makes a great husband.
8. If you don't know what you're talking about, or don't have anything useful to say, shut up already. Silence looks a lot smarter than babbling.

MNBen

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2017, 12:22:51 PM »
5. Don't worry about what people think of you.

I vowed I'd read these all before responding and this was going to be what I added, until it appeared in the last one, but I will still elaborate as it fits many others.

I left my first job and was truly heartbroken in the decision.  I felt awful leaving them after what they'd done for me (or so I thought).  I left and it was basically 'good riddance' and I never heard from them again.  That really opened my eyes to a lot of things.   I left them to go independent (IT consulting), so learning not to care what other people think helped a lot during the IT downturn I was let go many times due to budget cuts... and even not budget cuts, I was at once job for maybe a week and the boss walked out, said "goodbye, see you tomorrow" and then I got a phone call from my rep who told me I was done.  I really stopped caring what people think, because of all the jobs and places I've been, I've realized there are less than 5 people that I still keep in touch with today.  Those are the true friends.  The rest were just nice because we had to be, which is fine.

So I feel I need to add something to this list, so I'll give this....

1.  Never fill your office/cube with more than a pen/pencil.  Makes it a lot easier to pack up when you or they decide it's time to leave!


SimpleCycle

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #24 on: May 25, 2017, 01:58:26 PM »
1. You have so much TIME in your early 20s, make good use of it.

2.  The struggles of your mid and late 20s will turn into your greatest asset.  Hang in there.

3. Keep all your budget spreadsheets, they are fascinating and help clarify your money values.

4. Spending money for emotional reasons rarely has the desired result.

AZDude

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #25 on: May 26, 2017, 07:50:42 PM »
1) Negotiate your salary.
2) Do not lease that car!!!
3) Have respect for yourself both in and out of the workplace. Say no more often and don't put up with crap from SO.
4) Travel more while you have the time.
5) Forget the long term plan, it changes too often to bother.

surfhb

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2017, 08:16:24 PM »
Save  More $

Travel

Take care of your body and Mind

Dump these toxic people you call friends

Duke03

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2017, 08:30:01 PM »
It's already been stated in this thread, but I'd strongly advise my younger self to not be affraid of the stock market.  In my early 20's I had over 75k in a checking account because I thought it was cool and made me feel rich.  If that money was in the stock market I'd really have been rich by my late 20's.

Kl285528

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #28 on: May 27, 2017, 06:56:18 AM »
I could write a book.
I'll just give a few that are currently top of mind.
1. Take half the time that you spent going out to bars and clubs, and practice guitar. You would have been playing in public 20 years sooner.
2. Don't confuse normal misery during 1st semester of law school with "oh, shit, I have really made a mistake coming here". Quickly acknowledge the fact that you really DID make a mistake to go to law school, quit and regroup. Your future self will be much happier.
3. Being analytical is a blessing and a curse. Start training yourself to make quicker decisions on small items. You'll gain self confidence.
4. Yes, my friend, there is more than one person you could marry. Nothing wrong with that. There is NO PERFECT of anything, and that is ok.

I better stop before this turns into a real confessional.

Hargrove

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2017, 03:08:39 PM »
Don't change anything!

Who would I be if I changed something?

Current me would be dead. O_o

EscapeVelocity2020

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2017, 04:06:17 PM »
This one's simple, sell all of that tech stock in March 2000 and don't look back.  Don't buy on the dip, don't even give in to the temptation to short.  Wait a while, be introspective (maybe even interview Tokyo Joe and Henry Blodget on some new-fangled blog thing), and then deploy all of that capital a little more wisely in to index funds, small caps, international, and emerging markets.  Retire at 30 (in 2003) and become a "full time" blogger.  Get even more rich and famous by selling my house and going to cash in 2008 (true story, but didn't have a blog).  The rest I wouldn't change, living in Norway and Dubai, watching my 2009 investments go down and then up, and up, and up...  Life has been pretty much awesome from mid-2009 onwards, but thanks for the chance to optimize a little.  I could've been about 2x better-off and more comfortable ER-ing had I played those early cards a bit better or known what I know now about the market steadily going up for the better part of a decade so far - that has been very unexpected giving my early investing career watching bubbles seriously pop every 5 - 7 years...
« Last Edit: May 27, 2017, 05:39:51 PM by EscapeVelocity2020 »

sequoia

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2017, 05:08:55 PM »
Spend all of my money on stocks and rental properties.

milliemchi

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2017, 07:44:34 PM »
Other people are not as smart, honest, caring, good friends, non-judgmental, rational, atheist,  non-consumerist, self-controlled, humorous, and interested in learning and/or personal development as you are. Do not assume. Observe. Listen. When unsure, assume otherwise. People are different from you, even the people you date or are friends with.

If you have a choice of two equally good emigration options, pick the one where your husband will get the work permit sooner.

If your baby's delivery took three days, and you ended up in the OR, and you're in the hospital for another three and you pass out and they won't let you go home, and you haven't slept in six nights and seven days, you cannot care for that baby on your own. Find help. Also, don't let people who never cared for kids come to 'help'.

Stripping paint is a painfully slow and time consuming process.

You can break up with people. You'll live, and so will they. On a related note, people don't change (because they are different from you).

These are where I should have known better, and I didn't. Other stuff mostly went as well as could be expected.
Some more good advice...

Yes, it is a good idea to dump all the extra money into your 401k. (I honestly thought I was doing something dumb, but I couldn't figure out anything else to do with the money.)

Yes, you should avoid investing in annuities. (I just decided to skip what I didn't understand.)

Stock market investing is actually very, very simple. Here, read this book...

Yes, always choose the classes with more math. (I only did this because my mom said to do it.)

Read a book by Susan Forward, any one. Also, read 'Anger Management for Dummies'.

You can stop being friends with people. That way you make room for new friends.

Don't be socially self-conscious. Other people are also still figuring it out.

You are the expert on your own work. Nobody knows as much as you do. Don't fear questions.

If you talk to others, you will find shared struggles.

If you think you need to see a psychiatrist, you probably do. If you are offered drugs multiple times, you probably should take them.

redbird

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2017, 09:12:11 PM »
Invest in the stock market sooner. That's the only thing I can think of. I was more than easily able to get into Vanguard's Admiral Shares by the time I got into investing. I had 6 figures sitting in low interest bank accounts for way too long.

Abooki

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #34 on: May 27, 2017, 09:36:00 PM »
I am just 27 (28 this year but I have some advice for younger 20s self)
1. Take that full ride scholarship. You don't need to study out of state
2. Take time to date yourself
3. Don't compare yourself to anyone else.
4. Discover MMM and take it all in.
5. Good friends doesn't equal drinking buddies.  And remember you like board games anyways.
6. Invest invest invest! Invest your money and in good friendships.
7. Live life frugally it brings so much happiness. 
8. Get roommates princess!!! 


lemonde

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #35 on: May 27, 2017, 10:29:24 PM »
Don't change anything!

Who would I be if I changed something?

Current me would be dead. O_o

It's like the Butterfly Effect!

Seriously, I'd just say count more blessings.

better late

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #36 on: May 27, 2017, 10:53:22 PM »
1) stop buying breakfast every morning and lunch every afternoon. And snacks. Your husband owns a restaurant, you doorknob. Packing these meals would cost almost nothing.

2) take that professional exam or go back to school at night. Up your skill set.

marble_faun

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #37 on: May 27, 2017, 11:18:26 PM »
Well, my Past Self had to learn various life-lessons for me to be in the good position I am in now! :-)

So I might not change a thing.

sequoia

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #38 on: May 28, 2017, 04:22:46 AM »
Elope

Also, this.

^ this and use the money to buy more stocks and/rental properties. I can not believe we spent all of those money in one night (self punching).
« Last Edit: May 28, 2017, 04:24:29 AM by sequoia »

Reynolds531

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #39 on: May 28, 2017, 03:12:05 PM »
One house and one wife!

2microsNH

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #40 on: May 29, 2017, 05:53:50 AM »
Abooki, me too: Take the full-ride and don't insist on studying at the better school in the cooler town. This would have saved me $25K in student loans, which I just paid off at 47.
Also, as others have said, don't marry that person, and negotiate a higher salary at the outset.
 
« Last Edit: May 29, 2017, 05:55:44 AM by 2microsNH »

khangaroo

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #41 on: May 29, 2017, 08:45:48 AM »
College was a major fulcrum in my life so this advice mostly pertains to that.

1. Control/monitor the amount of students you take out.
2. Don't have a baby at 20.
3. Don't start playing DotA
4. Don't go to college with a girlfriend, be single. They're all The One until they're not.
5. Enjoy, maximize, and cherish the college experience. It's the greatest thing you only want to do once.

makinbutter

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #42 on: May 29, 2017, 08:48:18 AM »
Love this thread.

For all the young'uns out there (mid 30s millenial grandpa checking in here)...

1) Don't get married young, even when she says "I'm ready at age 23, and if you don't propose, I'm going to move on with my life."  Ultimatums don't work.  For anyone.  Ever.  Give her a hug and let her go and embrace the rest of your uncertain life with a smile on your face.

2) Related to #1 above, why did you spend $25k on a single, 8 hour wedding?  That shit cost you fifty dollars... a minute. 

3) Be braver, amigo.  Take some chances, even if you lose a bunch of dough, you'll be rich beyond measure in experiences and memories.

4) Buy more rental properties!  Get that landlord money.

5) Check this thread in 20 more years to see how stuff turned out :)

makinbutter

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #43 on: May 29, 2017, 08:49:33 AM »
College was a major fulcrum in my life so this advice mostly pertains to that.

1. Control/monitor the amount of students you take out.
2. Don't have a baby at 20.
3. Don't start playing DotA
4. Don't go to college with a girlfriend, be single. They're all The One until they're not.
5. Enjoy, maximize, and cherish the college experience. It's the greatest thing you only want to do once.


Re: #1 above... are we talking... assassin for hire?  You dated a lot of students?  Or, the most boring option, student LOANS?  Please please please let it be assassin-for-hire-who-takes-out-students

PDXTabs

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #44 on: May 29, 2017, 08:54:23 AM »
Max out my 401(k) every single year.

khangaroo

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #45 on: May 29, 2017, 11:30:12 PM »
College was a major fulcrum in my life so this advice mostly pertains to that.

1. Control/monitor the amount of students you take out.
2. Don't have a baby at 20.
3. Don't start playing DotA
4. Don't go to college with a girlfriend, be single. They're all The One until they're not.
5. Enjoy, maximize, and cherish the college experience. It's the greatest thing you only want to do once.


Re: #1 above... are we talking... assassin for hire?  You dated a lot of students?  Or, the most boring option, student LOANS?  Please please please let it be assassin-for-hire-who-takes-out-students

Let's just say that as soon as you miss your first student loan payment, Sallie Mae calls me...

DieHard_772

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #46 on: May 29, 2017, 11:53:29 PM »
--don't be scared of money... Instead, LEARN about it.
--drop out of that school... Right... Now. You are going to anyway, it's only a question of time.
--go get some paid gigs. You rock as a piano player, stop being afraid, and get out there.
--ask for what you want. Be willing to look bad in front of others in the name of going after what you want.
--being nice to others at your own expense really sucks. You gotta look out for number one, if you are not happy, what's the point?
--tell other people what you think more. Secrecy is over rated. Honesty is the best policy. What's the worst that can happen? They don't like what you say, and don't talk to you after that. Which is their loss
--get Out Of Your Head.  Life happens in the moment, come join the party, stop living inside your head
--trust your dreams. They won't fail you

WSUCoug1994

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #47 on: May 30, 2017, 02:55:53 PM »
- F**K the Jones'
- People don't change
- quality is more than quantity with friends/family
- Travel more - a lot more
- Take better care of your body
- Your dad is right - particularly about money
- Call your parents

RelaxationSpecialist

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #48 on: May 31, 2017, 08:26:17 AM »
"High five younger self! You crushed it by taking the risk, dropping out of school at 21, to live your dream at the beach 3000 miles away from anyone you know! You married "The ONE" at the end of your first date and 11 months later gave birth to an amazing son! You were broke as a joke for a looooonnnggg time, but it taught you that all that you need is all that you got. Don't worry about the money thing. At 40 years old you meet the other two "The ONE's" in your life, Dave Ramsey and Mr Money Mustache. By 43 you are debt free, the mortgage is two years from being paid off and you are adding to your investments in solid chunks. You did GREAT younger me!!! You took your own road and it has kept you happy for 22 years!"

:)

Edit :: TLDR - No Regrets!! YEOW!!
« Last Edit: May 31, 2017, 08:28:02 AM by traceyloveschad »

Jrr85

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Re: Advice to your younger self
« Reply #49 on: May 31, 2017, 10:18:06 AM »
(1) Stop worrying.  Unless you have a health event (which you can't control anyway, so no sense in worrying about it), you're worst case scenario is pretty good, so live in the moment a little more without worrying about the future.
(2) Stay in shape.  It's so easy for you compared to other people.  Just don't put on the extra weight to begin with and always exercise.  Don't spend 10 years out of shape and then spend three months eating reasonably, not even really dieting, and drop 20 pounds.  You could have just eat and drink reasonably to begin with and be in better shape those entire ten years.
(3) Be way more open to moving for your career.  Don't be locked into an area with very few large employers that can pay you. 
(4) Spend more time thinking about what makes you happy.  Don't dive into your career and think that a prestigious career and money is the goal.  Figure out what you want the money for and what the best way to get it is.
(5) Take more risks.  The top 5% of pay for most professions is plenty good enough, and will be easy enough for you to get to, so don't think you have to pick a high paying profession.  You have more options than CPA/LLM/MD/PE.
(6) With the exception of travel, keep your college lifestyle.  Keep your college lifestyle.  Keep your college lifestyle.  Keep your college lifestyle.  Seriously, keep your college lifestyle.  You loved college.  Why would you pick up a taste for $100 restaurant meals, expensive wine/scotch, etc.  You don't want to wake up after ten years and realize that you could have had another $300k in retirement accounts relatively painlessly. 
(7) Following #6, max out your 401k and roth every single year.  You make enough money that you should easily be able to do that and save outside of retirement accounts too.
(8) Travel.  This is the only thing you should probably spend more money on than you did.  You can take ten days off for real travel.  Don't rush over seas trips in order to only take five days off of work.   
(9) Don't be in a hurry to buy a home.  Rent is not throwing money away.