Author Topic: 9 to 5 Motivation w/o Debt  (Read 1333 times)

wombat9

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9 to 5 Motivation w/o Debt
« on: December 12, 2017, 08:25:34 PM »
I worked hard and was pretty successful at my 9-5 job for 8 years despite it not being the most personally satisfying. In 2016 my wife and I were able to buy a 4 unit MFH in an A+ neighborhood.  Ever since the purchase, I have not been able to shake the feeling that I'm wasting my time at work.  The three units cover 100% of property expenses and we have no debt.  Great situation to be in, but also killing my motivation (13h days w/commute).  We have no kids, a healthy reserve fund for the property, and large HSA for unexpected medical expenses.

Have other people encountered similar dilemmas?
 
I think the right answer is to stay the course and work 3 more years then try a career change.  On the other hand, I know that it's in my nature to always work so I'd just be throwing away another 3 years to have a little bit bigger nest egg.

Any recommendations for books, pods, courses would be helpful.

Classical_Liberal

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Re: 9 to 5 Motivation w/o Debt
« Reply #1 on: December 12, 2017, 09:41:09 PM »
Any recommendations for books, pods, courses would be helpful.

The classics are the best, Your Money or Your Life.

tl;dr version: If inflows >= outflows, you get to choose what to do with your life.

Have other people encountered similar dilemmas?

Yes, the marginal utility of each new dollar saved decreases after the basics of shelter, food, and transportation are covered for life with a reasonable (80-90%, statistically that's a much greater chance than living to 80) degree of certainty.  The more I dislike activities required to earn that dollar, the less likely it is I do them going forward once the above conditions are met.

IMO, this thought process requires a true personal definition of "enough", risk tolerance*, and a decision about whether or not one intends on continuing to provide value to society in more enjoyable activities (this will likely, eventually, build more wealth).  Edit: figuring out these things are much more difficult/time consuming than saving money, again IMO

(*) This is, in turn, highly dependent on ones ability to overcome obstacles and personal skill set.

Maybe some books on the above mentioned thought process will help too?
« Last Edit: December 12, 2017, 09:56:31 PM by Classical_Liberal »

wombat9

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Re: 9 to 5 Motivation w/o Debt
« Reply #2 on: December 12, 2017, 10:52:58 PM »
There are a lot of "Your Life or Your Money" titles at my library.  Are you recommending the author Vicki Robin?

We are way past the point of decline in marginal utility of dollars earned.  Finding those personal definitions is a whole different can of worms - trying to avoid calling it what it probably is...identity crisis.  Along those same lines, I think I can provide more value to society doing different work for less money.

Malkynn - Anything over 3 years and we'd have to move, so 3 is the max. 


Classical_Liberal

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Re: 9 to 5 Motivation w/o Debt
« Reply #3 on: December 13, 2017, 12:13:17 AM »
There are a lot of "Your Life or Your Money" titles at my library.  Are you recommending the author Vicki Robin?

Yes, but its Your Money or Your Life.  Much of it will be old news to you as it's designed to convince people to invest vs spend and chose "life".  The important parts for you may be the concepts of "enough" and flows; income or otherwise which covers all your needs.  That is if you haven't spent much time thinking about capital (financial or otherwise) in such ways before.  Others here in the FI world may take on a different tact, wondering about specific financials as they tend to be/think like engineers.  This book has that component, but also focuses on the more important points you make below.
Finding those personal definitions is a whole different can of worms - trying to avoid calling it what it probably is...identity crisis.

Right!

  Along those same lines, I think I can provide more value to society doing different work for less money.
I've thought the same way before as well, recently though I wonder if we are wrong; particularly when you think of capital in terms of things other than just financial.  Its the holidays, so  It's a Wonderful Life;  George Baily didn't have enough money, but he didn't need it either.  He provided a ton of value to his community and it paid dividends in unexpected ways.

The main point of my comments being, if you are in a net neutral or positive situation regarding your needs, you can provide value however you want, without compensation being considered.  However, be prepared to be compensated if you are providing value.  It'll probably happen.


soccerluvof4

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Re: 9 to 5 Motivation w/o Debt
« Reply #4 on: December 13, 2017, 03:29:24 AM »
I think the easy answer is dont wait 3 more years to make the career change. Start looking now. You know you have something secure so it makes it a lot easier to look.