Author Topic: Why are business majors likely to be financial trainwrecks?  (Read 22795 times)

RetiredAt63

  • Senior Mustachian
  • ********
  • Posts: 11698
  • Location: Eastern Ontario, Canada
Re: Why are business majors likely to be financial trainwrecks?
« Reply #100 on: June 18, 2017, 05:42:23 PM »

Maybe society needs to spend more time on finding what makes meaning in their life and how to balance it with everything thrown at them.

Sue Finley is still working at 80, and when I look at her job history I understand exactly why.  I would be too if I were her.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-himi-finley-20170605-htmlstory.html

clarkfan1979

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1919
  • Age: 40
  • Location: Pueblo, CO
Re: Why are business majors likely to be financial trainwrecks?
« Reply #101 on: June 24, 2017, 10:31:51 AM »
A general BA in Business is not a very rigorous degree. More specialized business degrees like Marketing or Finance are going to be more rigorous with higher paying jobs when done.

Acastus

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 368
  • Age: 58
Re: Why are business majors likely to be financial trainwrecks?
« Reply #102 on: June 24, 2017, 12:10:22 PM »
An MBA teaches you how to manipulate people and how money sloshes around a company and the economy. There are very few technical skills required to get the degree. Some schools force you, or give you the option, to also learn some accounting, operations, logistics, or statistics.

eddie

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 49
Re: Why are business majors likely to be financial trainwrecks?
« Reply #103 on: July 02, 2017, 08:37:24 AM »
My university made all the business majors take a class called Personal Financial Management.  It was an awesome class, the professor wanted to make it a mandatory class for the entire university, but had only succeeded in making it mandatory for business majors.  He created the curriculum and it included everything from balancing a checkbook, to insurance, investments, retirement accounts, time value of $.  Towards the end of the semester we had to write a paper on what we planned to do after college.  It had to include a detailed budget with housing costs, insurance quotes, line items for all the typical monthly expenses, expected salary after graduation, expected salary growth.  We also had to describe the qualities we were looking for in a potential spouse, how many kids we planned to have and when.  I still have the paper around somewhere, 15 years later.