Author Topic: weather appropriate clothing  (Read 11708 times)

taekvideo

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weather appropriate clothing
« on: October 14, 2014, 12:13:35 PM »
Just had a conversation with my roommate who wants the thermostat at 68 degrees all winter (same one who wanted ac at 68 all summer...)

Him: 64 degrees is cold as fuck dude
Me: That's why you wear a sweater instead of a tshirt
Him: I don't like to bundle up all the time [and some other mumbled stuff I didn't quite catch]
Me: Wearing weather appropriate clothing is too much of an inconvenience huh?
Him: (raised voice) Weather appropriate clothing is for outside, we're in a house!

/sigh... just thought I'd share.
Probably won't matter much since utilities are split 4 ways, but still kind of sad.

Philociraptor

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #1 on: October 14, 2014, 12:22:05 PM »
Meh, I don't find it unreasonable. We keep the AC at 80 and the heater at 68. There's 4 of us in the house though, one of which is always hot and another of which is always cold.

GuitarStv

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #2 on: October 14, 2014, 12:28:18 PM »
It is idiotic to have your house so warm in the winter that you can lounge around in shorts and a t-shirt.  It is just as bad to have your house so cold in the summer that you are comfortable wearing long pants.

gimp

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #3 on: October 14, 2014, 01:00:50 PM »
As long as my fingers don't freeze on the keyboard, I'm happy. Once that starts to happen, I turn the temperature on - can't be working with frosty fingers, can I?

GuitarStv

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #4 on: October 14, 2014, 01:03:44 PM »
As long as my fingers don't freeze on the keyboard, I'm happy. Once that starts to happen, I turn the temperature on - can't be working with frosty fingers, can I?


gimp

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #5 on: October 14, 2014, 02:06:32 PM »
I knew someone would say that. My fingertips would still freeze if it was cold enough to need gloves. A much better solution is a small space heater with a fan pointed right at me. Far cheaper than running heat. Trying to type in gloves covering my fingers would be a no-go.

ketchup

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #6 on: October 14, 2014, 02:18:50 PM »
Like I reply every time someone in the office goes around asking what everyone thinks of the current temperature (our HVAC system is a clusterfunk and constantly being fiddled with by management): As long as it's between 45 and 85 in here, I'm content.

MgoSam

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #7 on: October 14, 2014, 03:24:05 PM »
During the summer we would rarely put the AC on, otherwise it was windows or suck it up, which I am ok with. During the winter though, I want the heater to be on. My roommate/landlord pays for the utilities so naturally he has final veto, but essentially are rule is that if we are cold in bed with a heavy blanket, then the furnace needs to be on, otherwise we we will be wearing sweatshirts and pants around the place. I believe we have our thermostat set at 68 but I could be mistaken.

sheepstache

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #8 on: October 14, 2014, 03:30:33 PM »
As long as my fingers don't freeze on the keyboard, I'm happy. Once that starts to happen, I turn the temperature on - can't be working with frosty fingers, can I?



Am I the only one who finds those things completely useless? My hands don't get cold, my fingertips do. Those are even worse than bare hands because you can't curl your fingertips into your palm every minute or so to warm them back up. Maybe I just have poor circulation.

galliver

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #9 on: October 14, 2014, 03:48:57 PM »
I refuse to wear two sweaters/pants, gloves, or hat inside while I can reasonably pay a power bill to heat my house. Just not worth it. My tolerance of heat depends on what I need to do that day; I become very averse to physical activity in temps above 78 or so. So I'll throw on the AC if I need to clean or something. In IL I couldn't sleep when my AC was above 72 (even if I didn't have it on all day/evening). Now that we're in SoCal, these are all less problematic issues.

Bob W

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #10 on: October 14, 2014, 03:57:21 PM »
68 is a good winter temp.  Since you're splitting 4 ways the difference in your part of the bill would be like 6 bucks for a total of maybe 30 bucks over the course of the winter.   Hardly worth the time to discuss it.   Better to keep good relations.

So the next discussion should be "Roomate, I think your probably right, 68 is about the norm"  Leave it at that.  You don't want to be the boat rocker in a 4 roommate situation. 

farmstache

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #11 on: October 14, 2014, 04:49:43 PM »
Maybe you should let it go for peace's sake, but I'm always appalled at the temperatures you guys throw around.

I live in what is officially subtropical climate (a few miles south of the tropic), and we get "winters" with temps as low as 41 (usually at night time, but every few years we get a 41 during the day with a 34 at night). Summers go as high as 97, with again the once in a while 100-102. Now here's the shocker:

Most of our houses don't have heating/cooling. Plus we're pretty bad at building for cold weather specifically.

I've never had AC in my house (except for a single unit at my parent's office when they started working from home), and never had any central heating. What we do is use portable fans for when it's too hot (in addition to wearing just shorts and tank tops inside the house, but I've been known to waltz around in a bikini on extreme heat), or small heaters for when it's too cold (in addition to at least one sweater, but when it gets to 45 outside, and you're like 55 inside, you might want to put on some extra clothing). This way each one handles their own temperature, plus you practice your temp tolerance and grow your badassity muscle over the years.

68 is too damn hot for winters. People in Rio de Janeiro put their ACs at 62 in summer. I'm cold sensitive, but I can still deal with 62 just fine, wearing a very light sweater. I would say if you want to be mustachian, keep it at 60. For my SO, this means only wearing pants and a sweater. For me, sometimes it'll mean wearing something a little warmer, like the summer sweater I bought in Toronto. I'm sure someone who bikes in winter can weather that just fine. My finnish friend says he wears a tshirt with temps as low as 50 inside the house.

That said, 68 is too damn cold for summers. That's the temp I use in the car for 2 minutes when I want to cool it down quickly. The regular would be 75-79, but I even think that's still very comfortable. I'm probably sitting under 86 degrees with a fan while my SO does his routine workout. Yesterday we went to sleep and it was around 93 inside the house. I took a 30 second cold shower just to get a little wet and air dried (naturally). Comfy for bed after that! This isn't really "oh I love this temperature" comfortable, but honestly it's pretty okay and why would you waste resources and badassity potential on AC?

I congratulate everyone who can go even one degree further on their comfort zone, but I still think you-all could do better... All that AC and heating has made your frugality muscles very flabby! :)

Zamboni

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #12 on: October 14, 2014, 09:40:45 PM »
Don't be a thermostat Nazi, now or in the future when you have a family.  Most people are comfortable in normal business attire at around 68; just leave it at that and keep the peace with your friends and future spouse and children.

I grew up in a house with thermostat wars.  No worth it.

taekvideo

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #13 on: October 14, 2014, 10:48:19 PM »
If it wasn't clear that was the end of the conversation. I didn't bother forcing the issue in summer either.  I just think it's pathetic that he finds 2 degrees in either direction of perfect room temperature unbearable.

GuitarStv

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #14 on: October 15, 2014, 06:26:27 AM »
As long as my fingers don't freeze on the keyboard, I'm happy. Once that starts to happen, I turn the temperature on - can't be working with frosty fingers, can I?



Am I the only one who finds those things completely useless? My hands don't get cold, my fingertips do. Those are even worse than bare hands because you can't curl your fingertips into your palm every minute or so to warm them back up. Maybe I just have poor circulation.

My extremities never get cold as long as my core is kept warm.  I've played guitar on stage when temperatures outside were about ten degrees without loss of dexterity . . . so I can't really relate to this 'freezing fingers' thing that people are describing.  :P

Last winter when biking to work at -30 in the polar vortex thingie that was going on I had cold feet and hands for the first time in a really long time.  Tried warmer gloves and heavier boots to no avail . . . it turned out adding another couple layers over my chest made the hands and feet warmer.  Maybe you guys just need to put on another sweater to keep those fingers typing?
« Last Edit: October 15, 2014, 06:34:19 AM by GuitarStv »

rocksinmyhead

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #15 on: October 15, 2014, 07:01:41 AM »
As long as my fingers don't freeze on the keyboard, I'm happy. Once that starts to happen, I turn the temperature on - can't be working with frosty fingers, can I?



Am I the only one who finds those things completely useless? My hands don't get cold, my fingertips do. Those are even worse than bare hands because you can't curl your fingertips into your palm every minute or so to warm them back up. Maybe I just have poor circulation.

My extremities never get cold as long as my core is kept warm.  I've played guitar on stage when temperatures outside were about ten degrees without loss of dexterity . . . so I can't really relate to this 'freezing fingers' thing that people are describing.  :P

oh man I'm so jealous. I'm totally a cold hands person. when I come in after being outside for a while in the winter (yes with gloves), it takes me a good 10 minutes to be able to functionally do anything! cold hands are definitely the limiting factor on what indoor temperature I can tolerate and still function (around 60F).

VirginiaBob

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2014, 07:02:52 AM »
Set the Tstat to 64 degrees.  Give him the options of running a space heater with a meter on it.  Divide up the utility bills as follows:

His costs:  25% of usage + what is added with the space heater meter/Total usage x total bill
Your costs:  Remaining devided by 3.

Your welcome.

senecando

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2014, 09:11:40 AM »
My extremities never get cold as long as my core is kept warm.  I've played guitar on stage when temperatures outside were about ten degrees without loss of dexterity . . . so I can't really relate to this 'freezing fingers' thing that people are describing.  :P

Well, you are a Guitar-Stove.

galliver

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2014, 09:18:26 AM »
As long as my fingers don't freeze on the keyboard, I'm happy. Once that starts to happen, I turn the temperature on - can't be working with frosty fingers, can I?



Am I the only one who finds those things completely useless? My hands don't get cold, my fingertips do. Those are even worse than bare hands because you can't curl your fingertips into your palm every minute or so to warm them back up. Maybe I just have poor circulation.

My extremities never get cold as long as my core is kept warm.  I've played guitar on stage when temperatures outside were about ten degrees without loss of dexterity . . . so I can't really relate to this 'freezing fingers' thing that people are describing.  :P

Last winter when biking to work at -30 in the polar vortex thingie that was going on I had cold feet and hands for the first time in a really long time.  Tried warmer gloves and heavier boots to no avail . . . it turned out adding another couple layers over my chest made the hands and feet warmer.  Maybe you guys just need to put on another sweater to keep those fingers typing?
You should be aware that women are genetically predisposed to suffer cold extremities (in order to keep the core warmer). May not want to flaunt your superpower to any lady you want sticking around. ;)

My fingers and toes are definitely first to freeze...

eyePod

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2014, 09:33:14 AM »
Get him a pair of these:


http://handerpants.com/

sheepstache

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #20 on: October 16, 2014, 02:29:53 PM »
As long as my fingers don't freeze on the keyboard, I'm happy. Once that starts to happen, I turn the temperature on - can't be working with frosty fingers, can I?



Am I the only one who finds those things completely useless? My hands don't get cold, my fingertips do. Those are even worse than bare hands because you can't curl your fingertips into your palm every minute or so to warm them back up. Maybe I just have poor circulation.

My extremities never get cold as long as my core is kept warm.  I've played guitar on stage when temperatures outside were about ten degrees without loss of dexterity . . . so I can't really relate to this 'freezing fingers' thing that people are describing.  :P

oh man I'm so jealous. I'm totally a cold hands person. when I come in after being outside for a while in the winter (yes with gloves), it takes me a good 10 minutes to be able to functionally do anything! cold hands are definitely the limiting factor on what indoor temperature I can tolerate and still function (around 60F).

You should be aware that women are genetically predisposed to suffer cold extremities (in order to keep the core warmer). May not want to flaunt your superpower to any lady you want sticking around. ;)

Thank you, Galliver, for the reminder that we can at least feel superior about being less likely to die of hypothermia.

Yeah I think the 'I can stand the cold / heat / fasting,' etc., can confuse virtue with physiology. I never mind the heat but I'm a whiny baby about cold, so I don't chalk up my heat tolerance to will power, I recognize that's just how my body is. That's why the OP's story is so funny to me, because the roommate also can't go above 68 either!

I was going to say the difference is sitting vs. moving around. The picture shows someone sitting at a keyboard and my temp swings a lot depending whether I'm moving around or sitting, must be a metabolic thing.  But then I remember I need gloves even when shoveling snow which I can strip down to a flannel shirt for. So, yes, while I do feel very jealous of people who can stay warm, info like guitarstv's helps me realize there's a limit to what I can do about it if I've wrapped my core up so much that I'm sweating.

Well, you are a Guitar-Stove.

HA

galliver

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #21 on: October 16, 2014, 02:38:49 PM »
You should be aware that women are genetically predisposed to suffer cold extremities (in order to keep the core warmer). May not want to flaunt your superpower to any lady you want sticking around. ;)

Thank you, Galliver, for the reminder that we can at least feel superior about being less likely to die of hypothermia.

Yeah I think the 'I can stand the cold / heat / fasting,' etc., can confuse virtue with physiology. I never mind the heat but I'm a whiny baby about cold, so I don't chalk up my heat tolerance to will power, I recognize that's just how my body is. That's why the OP's story is so funny to me, because the roommate also can't go above 68 either!

I was going to say the difference is sitting vs. moving around. The picture shows someone sitting at a keyboard and my temp swings a lot depending whether I'm moving around or sitting, must be a metabolic thing.  But then I remember I need gloves even when shoveling snow which I can strip down to a flannel shirt for. So, yes, while I do feel very jealous of people who can stay warm, info like guitarstv's helps me realize there's a limit to what I can do about it if I've wrapped my core up so much that I'm sweating.

Well, it's also a reminder that, biologically, we're designed to be babymakers first and all else second :( But also extra bodyfat+ core-centric heat management = better survival? maybe.

sheepstache

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #22 on: October 16, 2014, 03:24:09 PM »
You should be aware that women are genetically predisposed to suffer cold extremities (in order to keep the core warmer). May not want to flaunt your superpower to any lady you want sticking around. ;)

Thank you, Galliver, for the reminder that we can at least feel superior about being less likely to die of hypothermia.

Yeah I think the 'I can stand the cold / heat / fasting,' etc., can confuse virtue with physiology. I never mind the heat but I'm a whiny baby about cold, so I don't chalk up my heat tolerance to will power, I recognize that's just how my body is. That's why the OP's story is so funny to me, because the roommate also can't go above 68 either!

I was going to say the difference is sitting vs. moving around. The picture shows someone sitting at a keyboard and my temp swings a lot depending whether I'm moving around or sitting, must be a metabolic thing.  But then I remember I need gloves even when shoveling snow which I can strip down to a flannel shirt for. So, yes, while I do feel very jealous of people who can stay warm, info like guitarstv's helps me realize there's a limit to what I can do about it if I've wrapped my core up so much that I'm sweating.

Well, it's also a reminder that, biologically, we're designed to be babymakers first and all else second :( But also extra bodyfat+ core-centric heat management = better survival? maybe.

Or that we're so cognitively gifted we can get by without a few fingers and toes.

No, seriously, not speculation on my part, my understanding is actually that men are in more danger from the cold. I haven't looked into it extensively though. (And I do mean, "in more danger from," not "more likely to die from." Women's number one defense against hypothermia is that they are less likely to go out in the freezing fucking cold; but under similar conditions it seems they also fare better.)
http://scuba-doc.com/coldjolie.html

Runge

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #23 on: October 16, 2014, 03:34:19 PM »
OP, you could always just hack into the thermostat and have it read a higher temperature in the winter than it actually is, and cooler in the summer. That way you could trick his brain into thinking 65 feels like 68 in the winter and 72 feels like 68 in the summer.

Although if he found out, it likely wouldn't turn out that great...

galliver

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #24 on: October 16, 2014, 03:52:44 PM »
You should be aware that women are genetically predisposed to suffer cold extremities (in order to keep the core warmer). May not want to flaunt your superpower to any lady you want sticking around. ;)

Thank you, Galliver, for the reminder that we can at least feel superior about being less likely to die of hypothermia.

Yeah I think the 'I can stand the cold / heat / fasting,' etc., can confuse virtue with physiology. I never mind the heat but I'm a whiny baby about cold, so I don't chalk up my heat tolerance to will power, I recognize that's just how my body is. That's why the OP's story is so funny to me, because the roommate also can't go above 68 either!

I was going to say the difference is sitting vs. moving around. The picture shows someone sitting at a keyboard and my temp swings a lot depending whether I'm moving around or sitting, must be a metabolic thing.  But then I remember I need gloves even when shoveling snow which I can strip down to a flannel shirt for. So, yes, while I do feel very jealous of people who can stay warm, info like guitarstv's helps me realize there's a limit to what I can do about it if I've wrapped my core up so much that I'm sweating.

Well, it's also a reminder that, biologically, we're designed to be babymakers first and all else second :( But also extra bodyfat+ core-centric heat management = better survival? maybe.

Or that we're so cognitively gifted we can get by without a few fingers and toes.

No, seriously, not speculation on my part, my understanding is actually that men are in more danger from the cold. I haven't looked into it extensively though. (And I do mean, "in more danger from," not "more likely to die from." Women's number one defense against hypothermia is that they are less likely to go out in the freezing fucking cold; but under similar conditions it seems they also fare better.)
http://scuba-doc.com/coldjolie.html

Fact-scinating! :)

RetiredAt63

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2014, 08:05:51 AM »
My extremities never get cold as long as my core is kept warm.  I've played guitar on stage when temperatures outside were about ten degrees without loss of dexterity . . . so I can't really relate to this 'freezing fingers' thing that people are describing.  :P

Don't Canadians always play guitar/keyboard/drums in the snow?  ;-)  It is our native habitat, after all - mon pays, c'est l'hiver.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xE8d-SIIDK4

Cinder

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #26 on: October 22, 2014, 07:07:15 AM »
It is idiotic to have your house so warm in the winter that you can lounge around in shorts and a t-shirt.  It is just as bad to have your house so cold in the summer that you are comfortable wearing long pants.

Sadly, in my house I keep the bedroom thermostat at 70 when we're not there and 74 when we are, and my wife is still freezing, doesn't matter how many layers she has on.

I keep the rest of the house at somewhere between 65~70, it's hard to tell with the pesky bimetal thermostats in the rest of the house.  It also is baseboard electric radiated heat everywhere, not sure if the type of heating makes a big difference in how it is felt.

I roam around the house in my boxers, and she has many layers on and still has icicle fingers.   There really isn't a good solution.  I wonder if battery powered heated gloves would be cheaper?

GuitarStv

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #27 on: October 22, 2014, 08:28:10 AM »
Is your wife skinny and petite?  Female, skinny, and short has always seemed to be the physiological profile of people who are least comfy with cooler temperatures to me.  Can you fatten her up somehow?

Cinder

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #28 on: October 22, 2014, 12:06:35 PM »
Yep, skinny, petite, not much meat to her, and she has a fast metabolism.  Eats a pretty decent amount of food. 

I on the other hand have been maintaining 155~158 (down from 210 two years ago) and I am more prone to getting cold, but it doesn't take long for me to get back up to comfortable.

I honestly want to look into heated undergarments for her.. Layers of wool and she's still cold. 

Philociraptor

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #29 on: October 22, 2014, 12:33:44 PM »
Tell her to do a dozen push-ups, those always warm me up when my office gets too cold (most days, I'm on the north side and so that AC runs all day because the manager is on the south side where the sun hits).

taekvideo

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #30 on: October 27, 2014, 11:34:33 PM »
Yeah I think the 'I can stand the cold / heat / fasting,' etc., can confuse virtue with physiology. I never mind the heat but I'm a whiny baby about cold, so I don't chalk up my heat tolerance to will power, I recognize that's just how my body is. That's why the OP's story is so funny to me, because the roommate also can't go above 68 either!

I was going to say the difference is sitting vs. moving around. The picture shows someone sitting at a keyboard and my temp swings a lot depending whether I'm moving around or sitting, must be a metabolic thing.  But then I remember I need gloves even when shoveling snow which I can strip down to a flannel shirt for. So, yes, while I do feel very jealous of people who can stay warm, info like guitarstv's helps me realize there's a limit to what I can do about it if I've wrapped my core up so much that I'm sweating.

Yeah that's true, I'm more heat-sensitive... my comfortable range is 55-75 or so (I could tolerate a wider range but wouldn't be happy about it ^^)... and my mom is more like 75 - 85.. much different lol.  When I visit I'm sometimes using a fan while she's covered with blankets.

Apples

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #31 on: October 28, 2014, 06:48:22 AM »
We keep our house at 67 during the day in winter and 64 at night, which is chilly enough that I always need to wear two layers.  In fact, I need to go buy some more layers for this winter b/c most of what I have is that cheap stuff you buy in h.s./college that isn't actually warm.  But if I sit down (watch TV w/ DH, read a book, etc.), I HAVE to be under a blanket.  My nose is always cold at that temperature.  Meanwhile, my husband is perfectly comfortable.  And I'm at the very top of a healthy weight range, so I have plenty of meat on my bones.  Meanwhile in the summer I can handle the house being 75-80 and still sleep with a blanket on; my husband can't sleep unless the A/C is set to 75 or even 72 at times.  And we both work outside, so we adjust to temperatures over time.  I do think it has to do with being in a house.  If it's 20 and windy outside, I really don't want to come home to leave everything on buy my outermost layers and in an hour be chilly again.  And if I'm sweaty at 90 outside, 80 inside feels ok, but for him he doesn't cool down enough to get good sleep.

Dr. A

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #32 on: October 31, 2014, 07:33:57 AM »
Tell her to do a dozen push-ups, those always warm me up when my office gets too cold (most days, I'm on the north side and so that AC runs all day because the manager is on the south side where the sun hits).

But, for everyone's benefit, please start recording video before you tell your wife to stop whining and just do a dozen push ups!

Philociraptor

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #33 on: October 31, 2014, 07:58:32 AM »
Tell her to do a dozen push-ups, those always warm me up when my office gets too cold (most days, I'm on the north side and so that AC runs all day because the manager is on the south side where the sun hits).

But, for everyone's benefit, please start recording video before you tell your wife to stop whining and just do a dozen push ups!
Hey, it's not unreasonable. My wife would definitely do it, though she'd probably punch me in the throat for the suggestion first.

GuitarStv

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #34 on: October 31, 2014, 08:24:56 AM »
In that case, I'd suggest donning a bevor first.

robotclown

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Re: weather appropriate clothing
« Reply #35 on: November 01, 2014, 09:19:05 AM »
I found the solution a while ago: zippered coat.

Cold?        Zip the coat.
Warmer?  Unzip the coat.
Warm?     Take off the coat.