Author Topic: To-Go Embarrassment  (Read 28343 times)

partgypsy

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #50 on: March 31, 2015, 12:40:06 PM »
I think there may be some confusion about what "tea" is. I'm assuming it is afternoon tea, which is closer to a meal than a drink. Everyone get their own teapot with their own selection of tea, and then there are an assortment of savory and sweet foods to eat. Think finger sandwiches, pastries, also chocolates. I went to one and while it was not cheap it was definitely not $50 and I would do it again.

http://www.washingtondukeinn.com/durham-fine-dining/afternoon-tea/

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/HighTeaHistory.htm
« Last Edit: March 31, 2015, 12:43:37 PM by partgypsy »

sheepstache

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #51 on: March 31, 2015, 12:52:56 PM »
The perspectives of people with formerly-poor relatives are really interesting. I have a friend like that too. I mean, not at this level, but she thinks some of my grocery hacks are weird.

What seems to happen is that, without any well-off people around, the poor make assumptions about how well-off people act. And they're then determined to act that way themselves. Telling them, 'No, this is how people with money act and it is partly because of this kind of behavior that they have money," doesn't seem to help much with what has, by adulthood, been a long-ingrained emotional thinking process.

For example my friend thinks that since she earns decent money, she should just be able to buy whatever groceries she feels in the mood for (but then is surprised by "how much food costs" or that other people get a lot more than she does for less money). She is actually sensible and frugal in other areas, but her family frequently had to take food hand-outs, so this area of experience is lacking for her.

Gimesalot

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #52 on: March 31, 2015, 02:04:15 PM »
I think there may be some confusion about what "tea" is. I'm assuming it is afternoon tea, which is closer to a meal than a drink. Everyone get their own teapot with their own selection of tea, and then there are an assortment of savory and sweet foods to eat. Think finger sandwiches, pastries, also chocolates. I went to one and while it was not cheap it was definitely not $50 and I would do it again.

http://www.washingtondukeinn.com/durham-fine-dining/afternoon-tea/

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/HighTeaHistory.htm

Partgypsy - you are right it was high tea but in the morning as a brunch instead of in the afternoon.

Paul der Krake

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #53 on: March 31, 2015, 02:47:40 PM »
I looked this up and apparently, taking the to-go box is less common in Europe.   I might be able to justify it there -- the restaurants there are much more likely to provide the appropriate sized portions rather than American-style "all you and your family can eat in between two buns" portion.

Yeah, that's exactly right. I've never seen a doggy bag in Europe.  Then again, I've also never had such a large portion of something in Europe that the leftovers, if any, would really warrant saving them for another meal.
In my European family, we were raised with the expectation that if food lands on your plate, you're not excused from the table until it's gone, at restaurants and at home. Doesn't matter whether you don't like spinach, a fly landed in it for a split second, or you didn't think of asking the waiter how large the dish was. No excuses.

My mother would have a field day shaming the people who toss food away at corporate events on this side of the pond.

2ndTimer

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #54 on: March 31, 2015, 02:50:11 PM »
Reading through this thread I have come up with my response should my to go box ever be questioned.  I plan to say, "My maid loves these."

Sibley

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #55 on: March 31, 2015, 03:03:35 PM »
I looked this up and apparently, taking the to-go box is less common in Europe.   I might be able to justify it there -- the restaurants there are much more likely to provide the appropriate sized portions rather than American-style "all you and your family can eat in between two buns" portion.

Yeah, that's exactly right. I've never seen a doggy bag in Europe.  Then again, I've also never had such a large portion of something in Europe that the leftovers, if any, would really warrant saving them for another meal.
In my European family, we were raised with the expectation that if food lands on your plate, you're not excused from the table until it's gone, at restaurants and at home. Doesn't matter whether you don't like spinach, a fly landed in it for a split second, or you didn't think of asking the waiter how large the dish was. No excuses.

My mother would have a field day shaming the people who toss food away at corporate events on this side of the pond.

I know people who were raised like that. Clean your plate, the starving children in [pick your country] would love to have your food, etc. Every one of them (my experience!) are fat, formerly fat and have had to institute a complete change way of thinking to stay healthy weight, or on-and-off fat (yo-yo dieters). Not healthy!

The problem is that as a culture, Americans don't know what a portion size is anymore. If you teach children to eat everything on their plate instead of eating until they're satisfied, you're raising someone who will have an unhealthy relationship with food, which likely means they will struggle with their weight.

Bardo

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #56 on: March 31, 2015, 03:04:17 PM »
Apart from everything else, who were they worried would be looking down on someone with a to-go box?  The minimum wage waiters? 

Kris

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #57 on: March 31, 2015, 04:10:41 PM »
Apart from everything else, who were they worried would be looking down on someone with a to-go box?  The minimum wage waiters?

Maybe, actually.  As in, they were worried they would look poor enough to be on the same social level as one of those minimum wage waiters.  We do not live in a classless society, after all.  One reason we have those low-wage jobs in the US, I would argue, is because it makes those who don't work at them feel more like they have achieved "success." 

AlexK

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #58 on: March 31, 2015, 04:30:01 PM »
My company had customers from out of town they were schmoozing. Boss asked me to go to dinner with everyone, and it was at the fanciest steakhouse in town. I ordered the biggest meal they had, 24oz steak. Brought half back home to my wife along with bread and appetizers. Wife was happy!

I'm a red panda

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #59 on: March 31, 2015, 04:54:01 PM »
I think there may be some confusion about what "tea" is. I'm assuming it is afternoon tea, which is closer to a meal than a drink. Everyone get their own teapot with their own selection of tea, and then there are an assortment of savory and sweet foods to eat. Think finger sandwiches, pastries, also chocolates. I went to one and while it was not cheap it was definitely not $50 and I would do it again.

http://www.washingtondukeinn.com/durham-fine-dining/afternoon-tea/

http://whatscookingamerica.net/History/HighTeaHistory.htm

$54 a person is expensive, even for dinner with an alcoholic drink.  Knowing what tea is (and yes, I did know that tea is more like brunch than just a cup of tea)- doesn't make it sound more reasonable.

Eric

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #60 on: March 31, 2015, 05:49:37 PM »
Reading through this thread I have come up with my response should my to go box ever be questioned.  I plan to say, "My maid loves these."

Perfect!

dragoncar

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #61 on: March 31, 2015, 06:57:40 PM »
If the server asked if you wanted the food boxed up then clearly it's not that unusual.

This was my thought. Maybe it would be weird to -ask- in a fancy place, but the server asked you.  Why would they ask if the only acceptable answer was no?


I was once in an Indian restaurant in NJ, and my dining companion told the server "we'd like the rest of this to go". He took our plates (many places box things up for you, especially more expensive places, so nothing unusual there), left, and came back with the bill- no boxes.  He apparently took that to mean "to go away" and threw our food out.  We were mostly done, so I figured no big deal, but she threw a fit and demanded they make meals to give her to go. That seemed silly.

Maybe the waiter only asked because OP looked super low-class.  I would have asked him to fetch the manager immediately, for a whipping.

It pisses me off when they take my plate and come back with a box, and then I get home and they left out something I really wanted.  Happens often enough that these days I always ask to box things myself.

Jack

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #62 on: March 31, 2015, 08:39:09 PM »
Not only do I have no problem with taking food home, but there's one restaurant I go to that has a really tasty all-you-can-eat salad, so I plan to fill up on salad and take half my entree home.

That used to be my Olive Garden strategy. Except now I pretty much never go out for pasta. I make better at home.

In my defense, I generally only go there when (a) somebody else is paying or (b) somebody I'm with is getting a free birthday meal. One of my wife's friends has the same birthday as me, so one year we went and got TWO out of three meals free...

As for Olive Garden, they'll just straight up give you a second entree to take home.

kathrynd

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #63 on: March 31, 2015, 09:29:32 PM »
I'm totally classless.    We split dinner portions on a frequent basis.   We have brought along food to feed the kids,  brought our own wine,  always get a to go.   Hell,  around here people are offended if you don't want to take the left overs. 

But I gotta say,  even with the bourbon that $54 for "A Tea"  would be over my head.   I'd be thinking to myself  "I just paid $54 for tea and a roll.  What the hell do I do next?!"

(Full Discloser -  I buy 100 tea bags for $1.50 that last me for 3 months, so $54 worth of tea last me for 9 years or 6,500 cups of tea)

We do this a lot too.
I'm a small eater, and my husband wouldn't even miss the mount of food I would have taken.
On the occasions we do want to order something different, I will order the part I really want..such as fish, without the chips.

Shamantha

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #64 on: April 01, 2015, 04:59:53 AM »
I looked this up and apparently, taking the to-go box is less common in Europe.   I might be able to justify it there -- the restaurants there are much more likely to provide the appropriate sized portions rather than American-style "all you and your family can eat in between two buns" portion.

Yeah, that's exactly right. I've never seen a doggy bag in Europe.  Then again, I've also never had such a large portion of something in Europe that the leftovers, if any, would really warrant saving them for another meal.
I fully recognise this! In The Netherlands it is not done (as in: frowned upon but also: not common). There are only a very few restaurant types that serve large portions (Chinese-Indonesian) but even then when eating in the portions are reasonable. In most restaurants the portion sizes are such that you can have a starter, main course and desert and finish it all without a problem. My first time in the USA I could not even finish my starter...

For Chinese-Indonesion food to-go the portions are huge though, and people often order only for half of the people present, and still have plenty of food for everyone.

Le Poisson

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #65 on: April 01, 2015, 08:52:30 AM »
I'm totally classless.    We split dinner portions on a frequent basis.   We have brought along food to feed the kids,  brought our own wine,  always get a to go.   Hell,  around here people are offended if you don't want to take the left overs. 

But I gotta say,  even with the bourbon that $54 for "A Tea"  would be over my head.   I'd be thinking to myself  "I just paid $54 for tea and a roll.  What the hell do I do next?!"

(Full Discloser -  I buy 100 tea bags for $1.50 that last me for 3 months, so $54 worth of tea last me for 9 years or 6,500 cups of tea)

In the rare event that we go out for a family meal, we order for the adults and ask for empty plates to share with the kids. I guess we too have no class.

We do this a lot too.
I'm a small eater, and my husband wouldn't even miss the mount of food I would have taken.
On the occasions we do want to order something different, I will order the part I really want..such as fish, without the chips.

WerKater

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #66 on: April 01, 2015, 12:54:05 PM »
I looked this up and apparently, taking the to-go box is less common in Europe.   I might be able to justify it there -- the restaurants there are much more likely to provide the appropriate sized portions rather than American-style "all you and your family can eat in between two buns" portion.

Yeah, that's exactly right. I've never seen a doggy bag in Europe.  Then again, I've also never had such a large portion of something in Europe that the leftovers, if any, would really warrant saving them for another meal.
I fully recognise this! In The Netherlands it is not done (as in: frowned upon but also: not common). There are only a very few restaurant types that serve large portions (Chinese-Indonesian) but even then when eating in the portions are reasonable. In most restaurants the portion sizes are such that you can have a starter, main course and desert and finish it all without a problem. My first time in the USA I could not even finish my starter...
It might depend on the country then. In Germany (at least restaurants that I would go to) we would take leftovers home all the time if the portion was large and nobody would bat an eye. If a waiter or anyone else would have tried to stop me, I would probably have discussed this in detail with him. These days we don't eat out much, but when we did, I even used to take other people's leftovers.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2015, 12:57:16 PM by WerKater »

Cookie78

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #67 on: April 01, 2015, 01:32:20 PM »
Reading through this thread I have come up with my response should my to go box ever be questioned.  I plan to say, "My maid loves these."

Love it!


shelivesthedream

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #68 on: April 02, 2015, 02:32:00 AM »
Yeah, this "doggy bag" (what a disgusting phrase!) thing really does not happen in a England, and I find it kind of gross. Do correct me if I am wrong, but my mental picture is of half eaten food (as in, a burger with bites taken out of it) all mixed up together in a box and getting cold and congealed on the way home. I am a big fan of intentional leftovers at home, but only of appropriate foods (e.g. curry, salads, pasta).

But, by and large, our restaurant portions are totally reasonably sized for a moderately hungry person. I'm a small eater and usually cannot manage three courses... So I just don't order that much food! And it is more than I would cook at home but that's fine, because we don't go out as a substitute for cooking - we go out to socialise or to make an occasion of it.

I would think it 'classless' to ask for a "doggy bag" in England because it is not part of our culture, and unless it was a Chinese/Indian that also does takeaway they probably wouldn't know what to do! But clearly it's different in America and the waiters did actually ask, so it was obviously expected at that particular place.

JennieOG

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #69 on: April 02, 2015, 04:04:24 AM »
First of all, I kind of love going to tea, it's fun to sit and try the finger foods and drink tea and talk. I did it when I studied in England a lot, I like the scones, the clotted cream, the chicken curry salad, all of it. I took my best girlfriend to the Drake Hotel in Chicago for tea for her birthday and it was totally overpriced and awesome and I loved it.  I liked the cheesy water fountain and the harpist. We spent hours talking and it was worth every penny. So, I am overall frugal, but sometimes I don't care and just do what I want!

But, I gotta say, I'd be the first to snatch up the leftovers, I would have told the other girls they were all silly, and when the other one asked me for the leftovers the didn't have the balls to grab, I'd have been like, you are super nervy to ask me for the leftovers when you just publicly pooh-poohed taking them!

Merrie

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #70 on: April 02, 2015, 04:54:43 AM »
I spent a month in London, UK when I was in school, and I do seem to remember to-go boxes not being as big a thing there, though I do remember getting one on at least a couple of occasions. But then my husband flew over for a few days, and we went to this fish and chips restaurant where we were served this huge portion, and we asked for a to-go box and were told they didn't do that. So we wrapped it up in a bunch of paper napkins and carried it out in our hands, and snacked on it later that night in our hotel room.

Polaria

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #71 on: April 02, 2015, 05:21:41 AM »
I have seen people taking a doggy bag a couple of times in the UK, but that's far from the norm.

I have older relatives who used to take meat leftovers at the restaurant to give them to their dog back home.

Wasting perfectly edible food is "class-less".

dragoncar

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #72 on: April 02, 2015, 05:39:36 AM »
I have seen people taking a doggy bag a couple of times in the UK, but that's far from the norm.

I have older relatives who used to take meat leftovers at the restaurant to give them to their dog back home.

Wasting perfectly edible food is "class-less".

I usually ask for my tea bag to go.  That thing can be used 2-3x

darkadams00

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #73 on: April 02, 2015, 06:43:24 AM »
To-go has never been a problem for the wife and me, but we took an alternative tack. We don't really care for leftovers from some restaurants because we don't like them after rewarming (pasta and seafood mostly). So over the course of 2-3 years, we identified a few dishes at our favorite 5-6 restaurants that we like that happen to be proportioned exceptionally large as well. The order goes something like "We'll have the xxxx for an appetizer and yyyy with two plates.... Tea (for her). Water (for me)." We receive the food on one or more dishes and serve ourselves, just like we would at home.

We've done this so long, we don't even think about it anymore. But we've had a few friends comment on it when we were out together, sometimes with "That's a good idea," sometimes with "I could never do that." Maybe it's just another version of frugal that looks low brow or like penny-pinching senior citizens. I would say in my social circles, opinions about this are a toss-up. Almost every person who has ever mentioned it negatively uses social appearances as the motivator/excuse.

benjenn

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #74 on: April 02, 2015, 06:58:26 AM »
This all reminds me of a dinner I was at about 18 years ago in Washington, D.C. on a business trip.  I was in a newly promoted position and this was my first such trip with the CEO.  Joining us at a very expensive dinner that evening was our highly-paid attorney (not on staff) and his wife - both of whom are about 25 years older than me (I was early 30s at that time so they had to be late 50s but seemed older to me then than they do now in their 70s... LOL). 

The dinner itself was very nice but I was stunned that it ended up costing about $100 per person.  I remember thinking to myself that I could feed my family of four for a month on what that one dinner cost.  There were plenty of leftovers but we were in DC, staying at a swanky hotel without any kind of kitchen facilities in the rooms.  The attorney's wife nicely asked the waiter for a to-go box, which was provided.

Once she had the boxes, she proceeded to pack it full of everything left on the table.  Including the bread and all the sugar packets.  I almost laughed out loud.  I remember thinking then "oh... so that's why they have so much money... they don't spend it (we always paid for their dinners and the trip) and then they take all the freebies they can get."

I had someone else tell me they had seen him (the attorney) pocket an almost-new container of flavored coffee creamer at a meeting one time.  When someone raised an eyebrow at that, he said he wanted his wife to give it a try to see if it was something she would want to buy.  :)  They told me the story because EVERYONE in our organization knows and sees this kind of thing from them all the time.  It's something we all laugh about.

So, at least some wealthy people have no problem with getting something to-go.  :)

rockstache

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #75 on: April 02, 2015, 08:34:17 AM »
the boys were getting Hangry,

Haha! I am so stealing that term. This is me exactly, if I don't eat on a rigorous schedule. My sugar drops (or something, no doctor has been able to figure it out) and I can't focus or make a decision - including on what to eat. I don't speak much, because I can't say anything nice, and Dh knows to get me to food asap. Now that I am used to it though, I always carry a snack with me just in case.

kathrynd

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #76 on: April 02, 2015, 08:36:34 AM »
when we travel, I take all the tea, coffee, sugar from the motel room....love it

rocksinmyhead

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #77 on: April 02, 2015, 08:55:15 AM »
Interesting.  You know, my first thought was that there's probably a link between her embarrassment at asking for the scones (not wanting to look weird/poor in front of others) and her brokeness, which might be partly a result of buying things she can't afford because she doesn't want to look poor in front of others.

totally agree, and I think people have mentioned similar ideas here before (I know have). it's a lot easier to do stuff that might be seen as "cheap" when YOU know that you aren't actually poor. it's also easier if you really are middle/upper class, i.e. aren't worrying about trying to "fake it" or having someone identify that you are from a lower class background.

MgoSam

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #78 on: April 02, 2015, 09:26:42 AM »
Does the 'embarrassment' change based on venues? For instance, if you have leftovers at Applebees is it any more acceptable than a place like Morton's? I noticed that this place serves sandwiches and scones with your tea, which implies that it isn't a la carte, so maybe that could be why people don't think it is proper to take them to go? I know that many people don't take bread/breadsticks that are served to them when they dine out, could this be akin to that?

Either way I have no complaints about taking bread or scones because I know that they will be tossed.

netskyblue

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #79 on: April 02, 2015, 10:17:03 AM »
Most American restaurants serve portion sizes that are too big for a small person (and some big people!) to possibly finish.  Usually I cut my whatever-it-is in half, and I eat half and take half home.  So, no, I'm not packing home a half-chewed hamburger.  (I wouldn't go to a restaurant for a hamburger, though.  I don't order sandwiches at restaurants, I order entrees.)

I typically eat the side dishes (most restaurants give 1-2 sides) and half, or less, of the meat at the restaurant.  I don't typically take home side dishes, unless it's something cut-able, like a baked potato that you can cut in half. 

If I were served a portion typical to what I can eat in one sitting, I'd think that was a stingy-ass restaurant, and probably never go back.  Or else it better only cost $5-$6.

Guses

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #80 on: April 02, 2015, 10:27:48 AM »
This thread sorta reminds me of an episode of Extreme Cheapskate where the guy would go to a restaurant, order nothing and ask other patrons for their leftovers.

That is crossing the line in my opinion! :)

I have no qualms about taking the food that I already paid for and bringing it home.

MgoSam

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #81 on: April 02, 2015, 11:38:38 AM »
This thread sorta reminds me of an episode of Extreme Cheapskate where the guy would go to a restaurant, order nothing and ask other patrons for their leftovers.

That is crossing the line in my opinion! :)

I have no qualms about taking the food that I already paid for and bringing it home.

Agreed and honestly I believe that the restaurant should ask that individual to leave as that would be trespassing. One of the differences in eating in at a restaurant is the ambiance of it and I know that I would be annoyed if someone was panhandling while I was eating.

Miamoo

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #82 on: April 02, 2015, 12:34:02 PM »
From Sibley . . .

"The problem is that as a culture, Americans don't know what a portion size is anymore. If you teach children to eat everything on their plate instead of eating until they're satisfied, you're raising someone who will have an unhealthy relationship with food, which likely means they will struggle with their weight."

Perhaps.  We were taught to clean our plates as children - or else!  And my husband and I have never been overweight.

Kids and grandkids now were not brought up that way (Mom/Grammie always finished their plates - still not overweight).  Now . . . all 4 kids have weight issues and one out of the 9 g'kids is quite overweight.  No idea why.  Unless it's the type of food they're eating now that they're out of the house and away from me - The Food Nazi.

carozy

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #83 on: April 02, 2015, 12:40:23 PM »
I used to be a server, for different restaurants, including one fine dining.  It never crossed my mind that someone was being cheap when they wanted their food wrapped up.  On the contrary, the chef and I would take it as a compliment that the food was that delicious, the person wanted to take it home, too.

I've never had a problem taking yummy food leftovers home.  Honestly the only time I don't is when they don't have a container (which has happened, sadly, occasionally), or when I just don't like the food.

I love getting extra meals out of restaurant food.

justajane

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #84 on: April 02, 2015, 12:50:39 PM »
I studied abroad in Germany in university, and even as poor college students, it was unheard of to get leftover food to go in a restaurant. One time I went out with some friends to a pizza place. We had half a pizza left over, and I brought up taking it home for later. They were clearly uncomfortable with this option, and instead of offending, I just let it go. But the waste really bothered me. I mean cold pizza anyone? Although I have to admit that actual Italian, brick oven pizza probably wouldn't taste good unless it was reheated.

I still get a chuckle when I think about a thread I read on here about how some fraternity brothers would dumpster dive at Little Ceasar's for the "hot and ready" pizzas that got tossed at the end of the night. I wonder what your class conscious friends would think about that!

shelivesthedream

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #85 on: April 02, 2015, 02:35:36 PM »
If I were served a portion typical to what I can eat in one sitting, I'd think that was a stingy-ass restaurant, and probably never go back.  Or else it better only cost $5-$6.

And that, right there, is why y'all are so crazy in America :P

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #86 on: April 02, 2015, 03:45:33 PM »
Wait a minute.  That's $54 for tea and scones?  That doesn't come with bourbon or anything?

It's New Orleans; there was a cocktail before the tea.

When I first started reading this thread, I chuckled to myself about this experience, happening in a culture probably a thousand miles away from me. Imagine my utter surprise when I read that this occurred in my own fair city!

Daleth

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #87 on: April 02, 2015, 03:51:20 PM »
I have absolutely no shame in asking for to-go containers for food. Otherwise you know the food is just going to be thrown out.

There are people who are ashamed of asking for to-go? WTF? I have seriously never met anyone like this or heard of it. Such incredible foolishness.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #88 on: April 02, 2015, 03:54:10 PM »
Wait a minute.  That's $54 for tea and scones?  That doesn't come with bourbon or anything?

Maybe tea, scones, bourbon and a lap dance?
Or tea, scones, a twelve-pack of Newcastle Brown and a box set of the entire Beatles catalogue?
Tea, scones, a jug of hard cider, a fancy hardback edition of all the Harry Potter books, and a box set of all the Harry Potter movies? I would at least think about paying $54 for that.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #89 on: April 02, 2015, 03:55:04 PM »
$54 for tea and scones and people think it would be classless not to leave food?!  Seriously?  At that price for tea I would try to walk out with the butter and jam!

And the teapot, and at least a couple of cups.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #90 on: April 02, 2015, 06:08:46 PM »
A friend (overweight) and I went out for lunch for chinese one day.

She ordered the regular portion size, and I got the lunch special size...which is about 1/2 the size.

She ate all hers, and I didn't even eat half, which I took home for my husband to have for his lunch.


Portion size is way out of hand at a restaurant.
A news show did state once, that food was the least expensive component of a restaurant.
Thus serving  large portions, is what draws patrons in, instead of reducing portions and reducing the price.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #91 on: April 02, 2015, 06:25:42 PM »
Back in grade nine I heard this story from a teacher who had previously lived in Canada's Northwest Territory (Far North above the Arctic Circle). In the smallish town where she lived there was an old guy who'd go into the diner and ask for a cup of hot water. He'd then squirt in a ketchup pack to make 'tomato soup'. This happened every day at lunch. Other patrons would buy him a cup of coffee or a piece of pie. It was common for some patrons to ask for 'doggy bag' for their own leftovers and then give them to the old man. The teacher noted that the old guy hardly ever left his daily visit to the diner without one or two doggy bags of the other people's leftovers. When the old guy died everyone in town was surprised to learn the old guy had left an estate of several million dollars!

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #92 on: April 02, 2015, 06:39:28 PM »
Back in grade nine I heard this story from a teacher who had previously lived in Canada's Northwest Territory (Far North above the Arctic Circle). In the smallish town where she lived there was an old guy who'd go into the diner and ask for a cup of hot water. He'd then squirt in a ketchup pack to make 'tomato soup'. This happened every day at lunch. Other patrons would buy him a cup of coffee or a piece of pie. It was common for some patrons to ask for 'doggy bag' for their own leftovers and then give them to the old man. The teacher noted that the old guy hardly ever left his daily visit to the diner without one or two doggy bags of the other people's leftovers. When the old guy died everyone in town was surprised to learn the old guy had left an estate of several million dollars!

A similar thing happened where I live in Nova Scotia.
This 'bum' would scrounge food and looked and smelled pretty bad.
A local mechanic was always nice to him, and when the old guy died he left everything to the mechanic..a sizable piece of land and over $100k .

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #93 on: April 02, 2015, 07:21:46 PM »
I have to admit, I don't like it when it seems someone is taking advantage of someone else.  For instance, if I'm paying for the whole bill, don't choose the most expensive, biggest portion and then expect to take it home.  We can see you leeches a mile away and it's usually the last time you'll be invited if we can help it.  Order what you would order if you were paying and then we won't hold a grudge if you take the leftovers.   Also, please don't volunteer to take my leftovers too -- that's just hoggy. 

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #94 on: April 02, 2015, 09:51:04 PM »
I scored quite a few leftovers from a recent work lunch.

Some out of town colleagues came for a visit and insisted on going out to lunch every day. It was all on their travel expense tab, so I went along with it.

One day we went to a Middle Eastern place. About 15 of us working on this project got invited to the lunch on the company's tab. One of my out-of-town colleagues went beserk ordering appetizers such as falafel and eggplant dip...more than enough servings for the whole table. I had already planned to order one of the delicious platters and take half home.

So there was a ton of appetizer leftovers since everyone had ordered a main dish. I kept eyeing them and thinking they would make great leftovers that could last me about 3 days. I happened to mention this to the coworker that had ordered the humungous amount of appetizers. He said I should take it home, but my boss next to me gave me the evil eye as if I was trying to take advantage of the situation. Well, I ignored him and went ahead and asked for them to be boxed up.

I had delicious food for the rest of the week.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #95 on: April 02, 2015, 09:54:00 PM »
I usually only can eat a half rack of ribs, but when I go out to eat will usually order the full rack which is only a couple of dollars more than the half rack and box it home.

I've also wanted to take my own to-go containers to avoid all of that styrofoam waste, but I haven't mustered up the courage to do that yet. I guess I've thought others would think it's weird.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #96 on: April 03, 2015, 11:25:52 AM »
Are you kidding me?  Every year at my wife's work holiday party, there is an enormous amount of food left over, and every year, we take it, because nobody else will!  It's fucking paid for and is destined for the garbage can otherwise!  In past years, I've taken home 5-6lbs. of sirloin, but this year was the best -- took home about 40 mini-lobster rolls; took the lobster salad out of the rolls when we got home, and it was easily like 3 quarts, which would be something like $100 or more worth of lobster salad at the local market (I ate lobster salad and eggs for breakfast for like 4 days, and put if over salad greens for a few lunches).  Hell yes I'm taking that shit home (and I make more than enough money to buy my own).  It's fucking WASTEFUL to let that food get thrown away, and I HATE WASTE!

I'll bet the kitchen staff/serving staff was bummed.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #97 on: April 03, 2015, 12:45:30 PM »
To-go has never been a problem for the wife and me, but we took an alternative tack. We don't really care for leftovers from some restaurants because we don't like them after rewarming (pasta and seafood mostly). So over the course of 2-3 years, we identified a few dishes at our favorite 5-6 restaurants that we like that happen to be proportioned exceptionally large as well. The order goes something like "We'll have the xxxx for an appetizer and yyyy with two plates.... Tea (for her). Water (for me)." We receive the food on one or more dishes and serve ourselves, just like we would at home.

We've done this so long, we don't even think about it anymore. But we've had a few friends comment on it when we were out together, sometimes with "That's a good idea," sometimes with "I could never do that." Maybe it's just another version of frugal that looks low brow or like penny-pinching senior citizens. I would say in my social circles, opinions about this are a toss-up. Almost every person who has ever mentioned it negatively uses social appearances as the motivator/excuse.


My wife and I do this often too.

Especially since most meals at restaurants are basically enough for two people anyways. An appetizer and meal is almost always more than sufficient.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #98 on: April 03, 2015, 12:52:19 PM »
I was always told that it's rude to not take the left overs if offered, because it signals that you did not care for the food.

If the waiter asks you if you want to take the leftovers to go and you say "No" - you can expect the next question to be concern that you didn't like the scones.

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Re: To-Go Embarrassment
« Reply #99 on: April 03, 2015, 01:48:28 PM »
Back in grade nine I heard this story from a teacher who had previously lived in Canada's Northwest Territory (Far North above the Arctic Circle). In the smallish town where she lived there was an old guy who'd go into the diner and ask for a cup of hot water. He'd then squirt in a ketchup pack to make 'tomato soup'. This happened every day at lunch. Other patrons would buy him a cup of coffee or a piece of pie. It was common for some patrons to ask for 'doggy bag' for their own leftovers and then give them to the old man. The teacher noted that the old guy hardly ever left his daily visit to the diner without one or two doggy bags of the other people's leftovers. When the old guy died everyone in town was surprised to learn the old guy had left an estate of several million dollars!
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