Author Topic: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say  (Read 11945 times)

DadJokes

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #50 on: June 18, 2020, 06:09:46 AM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

Ditto.

I'm really going to hate it when we have to return to the office full time.

NorthernMonkey

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #51 on: June 23, 2020, 08:43:02 AM »
Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

All of my boring ass meetings are now on Teams. It really makes me want to quit work for a year just so I can avoid any more Teams/webex/zoom

martyconlonontherun

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #52 on: June 23, 2020, 10:40:22 AM »
Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

All of my boring ass meetings are now on Teams. It really makes me want to quit work for a year just so I can avoid any more Teams/webex/zoom
I have a really intense boss who micromanages. Looking out the window really drains me. I see the sun and birds chirping but I'm saddled to a computer.

damyst

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #53 on: June 23, 2020, 11:03:36 PM »
[Friend who lives on the west coast. Pre-COVID]

"I really want to meet up with my friend in Berlin. I haven't seen her in 8 months! So I booked the tickets last night, and I'm going there for 4 days. The sad part is I'll have to miss two appointments with my personal trainer. I mentioned this to my therapist, and he reminded me that I also need to call up the dog walker before it's too late".

marty998

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #54 on: June 24, 2020, 06:38:56 AM »
[Friend who lives on the west coast. Pre-COVID]

"I really want to meet up with my friend in Berlin. I haven't seen her in 8 months! So I booked the tickets last night, and I'm going there for 4 days. The sad part is I'll have to miss two appointments with my personal trainer. I mentioned this to my therapist, and he reminded me that I also need to call up the dog walker before it's too late".

This hurts my brain. Who travels halfway round the world just for 4 days? You'd spend half the time in airports and on the plane?

Sugaree

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #55 on: June 24, 2020, 06:57:50 AM »
[Friend who lives on the west coast. Pre-COVID]

"I really want to meet up with my friend in Berlin. I haven't seen her in 8 months! So I booked the tickets last night, and I'm going there for 4 days. The sad part is I'll have to miss two appointments with my personal trainer. I mentioned this to my therapist, and he reminded me that I also need to call up the dog walker before it's too late".

This hurts my brain. Who travels halfway round the world just for 4 days? You'd spend half the time in airports and on the plane?


Right?  I'm trying to convince my husband that we should go on a safari (travel hacking, FTW).  The problem is that I can't see spending 2 days on a plane each way just to spend three or four days doing game drives.  So, I'm trying to work out either a few days in Zanzibar or a few days in Cairo/Luxor to make it worth our while.

cupcakery

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #56 on: June 24, 2020, 07:42:53 AM »



I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.
[/quote]

This.

martyconlonontherun

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #57 on: June 24, 2020, 08:43:11 AM »
[Friend who lives on the west coast. Pre-COVID]

"I really want to meet up with my friend in Berlin. I haven't seen her in 8 months! So I booked the tickets last night, and I'm going there for 4 days. The sad part is I'll have to miss two appointments with my personal trainer. I mentioned this to my therapist, and he reminded me that I also need to call up the dog walker before it's too late".

This hurts my brain. Who travels halfway round the world just for 4 days? You'd spend half the time in airports and on the plane?
Depends on the situation. Direct flights from major cities aren't bad and if you have points to burn, why not? I also have airline lounge passes and small enough to enjoy flights. 8 hours on a plane drinking free wine and watching movies and maybe some random reading is enjoyment to me.

damyst

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #58 on: June 24, 2020, 10:01:25 AM »
[Friend who lives on the west coast. Pre-COVID]

"I really want to meet up with my friend in Berlin. I haven't seen her in 8 months! So I booked the tickets last night, and I'm going there for 4 days. The sad part is I'll have to miss two appointments with my personal trainer. I mentioned this to my therapist, and he reminded me that I also need to call up the dog walker before it's too late".

This hurts my brain. Who travels halfway round the world just for 4 days? You'd spend half the time in airports and on the plane?

My old boss would do this all the time - flying from Seattle to South America, Asia, etc for an extended weekend. He loves to travel, and this way he can travel more often and to more places (I get it - travel is a huge part of my life too, although I fly much less often and stay longer). When asked if these visits don't feel really abbreviated, he laughed and said that yeah, but if he went to his boss and said that he needs more vacation time because his trips are abbreviated, it wouldn't go over well.

This was a good reminder - not that I needed one - as to why I'm not staying in corporate. There was nothing up the ladder that interested me. With every promotion, they shower you with more money and simultaneously make stricter demands on your time and energy.

AMandM

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #59 on: June 24, 2020, 11:39:45 AM »
This hurts my brain. Who travels halfway round the world just for 4 days? You'd spend half the time in airports and on the plane?

My high school Spanish teacher had a friend who worked for an airline and had a pass to fly free on any flight with available space. One day my teacher asked her friend, "What are you doing this weekend?"  "I think I'll go to Paris. I have to return a sweater."

Fishindude

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #60 on: June 24, 2020, 11:43:48 AM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #61 on: June 24, 2020, 11:55:13 AM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

Someone has bought into the the lease marketing...

Fomerly known as something

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #62 on: June 24, 2020, 07:51:33 PM »
[Friend who lives on the west coast. Pre-COVID]

"I really want to meet up with my friend in Berlin. I haven't seen her in 8 months! So I booked the tickets last night, and I'm going there for 4 days. The sad part is I'll have to miss two appointments with my personal trainer. I mentioned this to my therapist, and he reminded me that I also need to call up the dog walker before it's too late".

This hurts my brain. Who travels halfway round the world just for 4 days? You'd spend half the time in airports and on the plane?

My old boss would do this all the time - flying from Seattle to South America, Asia, etc for an extended weekend. He loves to travel, and this way he can travel more often and to more places (I get it - travel is a huge part of my life too, although I fly much less often and stay longer). When asked if these visits don't feel really abbreviated, he laughed and said that yeah, but if he went to his boss and said that he needs more vacation time because his trips are abbreviated, it wouldn't go over well.

This was a good reminder - not that I needed one - as to why I'm not staying in corporate. There was nothing up the ladder that interested me. With every promotion, they shower you with more money and simultaneously make stricter demands on your time and energy.

Iíve done a trip to Ireland where I was on the ground for 3.5 days basically.  I did it because I had a rocking fare to get there but had already used up most of my vacation time 2 months earlier on a multi week trip.  I had a good time and would do something like this again, if I can find a similar deal.  I just created a plan that was limited to fit with my limited time.

RainyDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #63 on: June 25, 2020, 11:39:31 AM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

Even if they buy a brand-new car, it would be paid off in 5 years, in most cases.  So is a 6 year old car automatically NOT decent?  What happens at the 6 year mark to make the car totally crappy? 

AerynLee

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #64 on: June 25, 2020, 12:00:53 PM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

Even if they buy a brand-new car, it would be paid off in 5 years, in most cases.  So is a 6 year old car automatically NOT decent?  What happens at the 6 year mark to make the car totally crappy?
5 years of non-existent maintenance because they "can't afford it"

markbike528CBX

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #65 on: June 25, 2020, 12:27:16 PM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

Ditto.

I'm really going to hate it when we have to return to the office full time.

I'm having such a nice apocalypse, I forget a)all the actual covid suffering, b)all the indirect covid suffering (economic, general worry tensions etc).
We are on a low-information diet, so I leave the room during any news-entertainment broadcast.

I do care (parents are aging and in high-risk categories).
So I check out: https://elm.nsupdate.info/virus/#world   to keep myself current.
It also has US-by-county info too.  So I can check out the latest local stuff myself, without having to find out how the Kardashians are emoting over the issue.
https://elm.nsupdate.info/statisticdata/uscountriesbynames/

solon

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #66 on: June 25, 2020, 03:10:37 PM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

Ditto.

I'm really going to hate it when we have to return to the office full time.

I'm having such a nice apocalypse, I forget a)all the actual covid suffering, b)all the indirect covid suffering (economic, general worry tensions etc).
We are on a low-information diet, so I leave the room during any news-entertainment broadcast.

I do care (parents are aging and in high-risk categories).
So I check out: https://elm.nsupdate.info/virus/#world   to keep myself current.
It also has US-by-county info too.  So I can check out the latest local stuff myself, without having to find out how the Kardashians are emoting over the issue.
https://elm.nsupdate.info/statisticdata/uscountriesbynames/

Careful... ptmoney got cancelled for saying something like this! https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/cancel-fincon/

markbike528CBX

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #67 on: June 25, 2020, 06:42:03 PM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

Ditto.

I'm really going to hate it when we have to return to the office full time.

I'm having such a nice apocalypse, I forget a)all the actual covid suffering, b)all the indirect covid suffering (economic, general worry tensions etc).
We are on a low-information diet, so I leave the room during any news-entertainment broadcast.

I do care (parents are aging and in high-risk categories).
So I check out: https://elm.nsupdate.info/virus/#world   to keep myself current.
It also has US-by-county info too.  So I can check out the latest local stuff myself, without having to find out how the Kardashians are emoting over the issue.
https://elm.nsupdate.info/statisticdata/uscountriesbynames/

Careful... ptmoney got cancelled for saying something like this! https://forum.mrmoneymustache.com/welcome-to-the-forum/cancel-fincon/
@solon thanks for the warning, but exactly what was said?   I can't find it the linked thread.  PM me if necessary.

All I said, is that my lifestyle has not been significantly, meaningfully, impacted.  I also implied that I have to remember that others are greatly impacted.

Sugaree

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #68 on: June 26, 2020, 05:19:24 AM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

Even if they buy a brand-new car, it would be paid off in 5 years, in most cases.  So is a 6 year old car automatically NOT decent?  What happens at the 6 year mark to make the car totally crappy?

I can't tell you how many people I've met that think that paying off one car is the sign that it's time to shop for a new one.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #69 on: June 26, 2020, 06:10:34 AM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

Even if they buy a brand-new car, it would be paid off in 5 years, in most cases.  So is a 6 year old car automatically NOT decent?  What happens at the 6 year mark to make the car totally crappy?

I can't tell you how many people I've met that think that paying off one car is the sign that it's time to shop for a new one.

When we had 2 cars paying off a loan was the signal to start thinking about a new car, because at that point the older car was always well over 6 years old, with a lot of mileage.  But we were were not your typical car spendypants, I think.
Life without a car loan is so much nicer, though.  My present car has been mine, all mine, for 5 years now.

rothwem

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #70 on: June 26, 2020, 06:32:17 AM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

I donít understand how people have so much extra time. I still have the same amount of work to do, I just have to do it at home. Itís a bit more flexible, but my pre-Covid situation was pretty flexible too. I also didnít have much of a commute because I planned it that way. 

It seems to me that if your pre-COVID situation was that time crunched, and your WFH situation isnít, maybe thatís a signal that you need to make some structural changes in your lifestyle.

Uturn

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #71 on: June 26, 2020, 06:58:30 AM »
Friend bragging about all the neat things his new Tesla does.  Then he says that he doesn't understand why more people don't buy a Tesla.  I said that Tesla has some great features and I hope they trickle down to the general car population soon, but there is no way I am paying that much for a car.  He laughs and say you cannot even buy a decent used car for less than $25k. 

ketchup

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #72 on: June 26, 2020, 08:05:58 AM »
Friend bragging about all the neat things his new Tesla does.  Then he says that he doesn't understand why more people don't buy a Tesla.  I said that Tesla has some great features and I hope they trickle down to the general car population soon, but there is no way I am paying that much for a car.  He laughs and say you cannot even buy a decent used car for less than $25k.
How can someone be so out of touch? Does he also think minimum wage is $45/hr?

RainyDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #73 on: June 26, 2020, 08:49:12 AM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

I donít understand how people have so much extra time. I still have the same amount of work to do, I just have to do it at home. Itís a bit more flexible, but my pre-Covid situation was pretty flexible too. I also didnít have much of a commute because I planned it that way. 

It seems to me that if your pre-COVID situation was that time crunched, and your WFH situation isnít, maybe thatís a signal that you need to make some structural changes in your lifestyle.

You're absolutely right, which is why my priority for the past 6 months (ever since I started reading this blog) was to find a job either close to home or with telework options, which my current job didn't have until COVID.  But now the extra time comes from not commuting, so I have almost an extra 2 hours per day.  Plus I can leave my keyboard to start a load of laundry or whatever.  It's nice that your job allowed a lot of flexibility, but mine did not. 

CupcakeGuru

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #74 on: June 26, 2020, 09:20:17 AM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 09:22:51 AM by CupcakeGuru »

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #75 on: June 26, 2020, 09:43:16 AM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.

The thing with the sports that have travel teams for elementary school-aged kids is that the competition for scholarships is very intense. For some sports it might not exist.

A more intelligent alternative, if sports scholarships are the goal, would be to start the kid in golf, tennis, or some other sport that has less of an initial investment, fewer travel teams, and little to no media attention. Basketball, football, and other high-profile team sports would be out but other less expensive options would be viable. Of course the kid would have to enjoy the sport and spend time with it, and he or she would have to genuinely feel a strong competitive drive. That, together with some experience and solid basics, should be enough to get the kid onto a high school team and into the running.

But even then, a scholarship is not guaranteed (much less to a school the kid would like to attend).

Sugaree

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #76 on: June 26, 2020, 10:46:41 AM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.

The thing with the sports that have travel teams for elementary school-aged kids is that the competition for scholarships is very intense. For some sports it might not exist.

A more intelligent alternative, if sports scholarships are the goal, would be to start the kid in golf, tennis, or some other sport that has less of an initial investment, fewer travel teams, and little to no media attention. Basketball, football, and other high-profile team sports would be out but other less expensive options would be viable. Of course the kid would have to enjoy the sport and spend time with it, and he or she would have to genuinely feel a strong competitive drive. That, together with some experience and solid basics, should be enough to get the kid onto a high school team and into the running.

But even then, a scholarship is not guaranteed (much less to a school the kid would like to attend).


I played tennis throughout HS.  I can say that there is a ton of competition from foreign players for tennis scholarships.  Even the best players from the junior tournament circuit I participated in often ended up having to go the CC route for a tennis scholarship.

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #77 on: June 26, 2020, 11:08:00 AM »
I have a niece in travel cheer. That is, they aren't cheering for anything, ever, they just travel around competing. I find it ironically depressing.

The nice thing about travel sports is that far more kids can participate than would be able to in the traditional system. The down side to that is, it is more about buying your way onto the team.

Their family usually pays for it, at least in part, by working the concessions at an affiliated venue. The fact that the venue probably won't open this year, the fact that they probably won't be allowed to travel this year, the fact that the sole breadwinner was furloughed at the time the gym reopened, has not put a damper on paying for the training itself.

Uturn

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #78 on: June 26, 2020, 11:20:37 AM »
Friend bragging about all the neat things his new Tesla does.  Then he says that he doesn't understand why more people don't buy a Tesla.  I said that Tesla has some great features and I hope they trickle down to the general car population soon, but there is no way I am paying that much for a car.  He laughs and say you cannot even buy a decent used car for less than $25k.
How can someone be so out of touch? Does he also think minimum wage is $45/hr?

I have never asked, because it's really none of my business, but I suspect he has a trust fund or other such income.  Even with very loose lending standards, the math doesn't work between his salary and things he owns.

CupcakeGuru

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #79 on: June 26, 2020, 01:53:39 PM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.

The thing with the sports that have travel teams for elementary school-aged kids is that the competition for scholarships is very intense. For some sports it might not exist.

A more intelligent alternative, if sports scholarships are the goal, would be to start the kid in golf, tennis, or some other sport that has less of an initial investment, fewer travel teams, and little to no media attention. Basketball, football, and other high-profile team sports would be out but other less expensive options would be viable. Of course the kid would have to enjoy the sport and spend time with it, and he or she would have to genuinely feel a strong competitive drive. That, together with some experience and solid basics, should be enough to get the kid onto a high school team and into the running.

But even then, a scholarship is not guaranteed (much less to a school the kid would like to attend).


I played tennis throughout HS.  I can say that there is a ton of competition from foreign players for tennis scholarships.  Even the best players from the junior tournament circuit I participated in often ended up having to go the CC route for a tennis scholarship.

So my friend asked me to help out calculating what the spend would be if the kids did travel teams. So I did the math for my friend.

Kid 1 - 6th grade. Team estimates that each trip will be @$150 all in (hotel, food, gas, etc) and there will be about 10 trips per year
$3000 per year x 6 years = $18,000
10 trips per year @$150 each x 6 years = $9,000
Total $27,000
That's just for 1 kid

SwordGuy

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #80 on: June 26, 2020, 07:21:02 PM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.

The thing with the sports that have travel teams for elementary school-aged kids is that the competition for scholarships is very intense. For some sports it might not exist.

A more intelligent alternative, if sports scholarships are the goal, would be to start the kid in golf, tennis, or some other sport that has less of an initial investment, fewer travel teams, and little to no media attention. Basketball, football, and other high-profile team sports would be out but other less expensive options would be viable. Of course the kid would have to enjoy the sport and spend time with it, and he or she would have to genuinely feel a strong competitive drive. That, together with some experience and solid basics, should be enough to get the kid onto a high school team and into the running.

But even then, a scholarship is not guaranteed (much less to a school the kid would like to attend).


I played tennis throughout HS.  I can say that there is a ton of competition from foreign players for tennis scholarships.  Even the best players from the junior tournament circuit I participated in often ended up having to go the CC route for a tennis scholarship.

So my friend asked me to help out calculating what the spend would be if the kids did travel teams. So I did the math for my friend.

Kid 1 - 6th grade. Team estimates that each trip will be @$150 all in (hotel, food, gas, etc) and there will be about 10 trips per year
$3000 per year x 6 years = $18,000
10 trips per year @$150 each x 6 years = $9,000
Total $27,000
That's just for 1 kid

You can get a college education in NC for less than that if you live in commuting distance from 5 different universities, and for maybe $10,000 more if you need to get room and board at them.

NorthernMonkey

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #81 on: June 27, 2020, 05:22:39 AM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

Even if they buy a brand-new car, it would be paid off in 5 years, in most cases.  So is a 6 year old car automatically NOT decent?  What happens at the 6 year mark to make the car totally crappy?

My Leaf is 5 years old now, and I've had it for 1 year. It feels almost brand new to me. All the bits work, not like my last 14 year old car where loads of bits didnt work, and there were more dents than bits without dents
I can't tell you how many people I've met that think that paying off one car is the sign that it's time to shop for a new one.

DadJokes

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #82 on: June 27, 2020, 09:05:54 AM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!

I donít understand how people have so much extra time. I still have the same amount of work to do, I just have to do it at home. Itís a bit more flexible, but my pre-Covid situation was pretty flexible too. I also didnít have much of a commute because I planned it that way. 

It seems to me that if your pre-COVID situation was that time crunched, and your WFH situation isnít, maybe thatís a signal that you need to make some structural changes in your lifestyle.

I disagree.

I work in the city, and my wife works near where we live. As a result, I have a long commute. There aren't jobs for what I do in the small town we live in, and my wife loves where she works. Moving closer to my job adds to her commute an equal amount of time.

Even if we both worked in the city, I wouldn't want to live there, for a couple main reasons:

1. Increased cost of housing in the city far outweighs cost savings of reduced commute.

2. Being around that many people is stressful to me. The pandemic and protests are good examples of why I want nothing to do with living in a city.

Outside of the pandemic, that's worth giving up ~8 hours per week.

MudPuppy

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #83 on: June 27, 2020, 11:31:57 AM »
I agree with @DadJokes. The actual city I live near is traffic crowded and frankly has grown too fast for the past 5-8 years to be appealing to me as a home. I could theoretically take a commuter train into it if I worked there, but then I would still have to drive to the station and walk to the place I worked. The public transit in that city is not good at all. My house costs half to 1/3 what a similar property in the city would, and my commute is only 30-45 minutes depending on time of day and which campus I am working at.

Gremlin

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #84 on: June 27, 2020, 05:36:33 PM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.

There's also a dirty little secret in this space.

Not all kids in all the "travel teams" are paying the $$$$.  There's every chance the absolute best talent - ie the ones who are ultimately most likely to get those aforementioned golden ticket scholarships - are on a free ride, even at this stage of their career.  Lots of others get spun a story that being on such teams is the path to a scholarship.  It's not false.  It's just not quite the way it's portrayed.

RainyDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #85 on: June 29, 2020, 08:25:46 AM »
I work in the city, and my wife works near where we live. As a result, I have a long commute. There aren't jobs for what I do in the small town we live in, and my wife loves where she works. Moving closer to my job adds to her commute an equal amount of time.

Even if we both worked in the city, I wouldn't want to live there, for a couple main reasons:

1. Increased cost of housing in the city far outweighs cost savings of reduced commute.

2. Being around that many people is stressful to me. The pandemic and protests are good examples of why I want nothing to do with living in a city.

Outside of the pandemic, that's worth giving up ~8 hours per week.

Same.  I could never live in a city -- I hate crowds and buildings.  I love to garden and do yard work, and we live walking distance to a 600 acre park with 12 miles of hiking trails. 

Just Joe

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #86 on: June 30, 2020, 11:28:17 AM »
Same here. We went the small town route and made career choices to fit places (this place) that we like to live. I'm sure we've earned less than we would in the big city but I'm sure we're ahead on the long game. We did the big city thing earlier in life. Neat places to visit, not interested in living there anymore for reasons that DadJokes detailed among others.

ColoAndy

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #87 on: July 01, 2020, 01:14:28 PM »
"It's only $355 per month" says the guy who just leased a 2020 Dodge Ram to go along with the leased vehicles he got for his wife and son.  Daughter gets her vehicle in January.  4 lease payments. 4 of them.

bbqbonelesswing

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #88 on: July 01, 2020, 01:36:28 PM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.

My parents fell for this scheme with my younger sister, who played travel soccer. After spending thousands of dollars and every weekend on soccer, the scholarships that my sister actually landed didn't even cover that much, and they had to take out loans for the rest of her tuition. They would have been better off saving throughout the years and cutting a check for college. Selling people on the scholarship idea really gets a lot of them hooked.


Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #89 on: July 01, 2020, 02:06:29 PM »
Friend of mine ....... "I figure you're always gonna have a car payment.   Just no way around it if you want to drive anything decent."

Even if they buy a brand-new car, it would be paid off in 5 years, in most cases.  So is a 6 year old car automatically NOT decent?  What happens at the 6 year mark to make the car totally crappy?

I can't tell you how many people I've met that think that paying off one car is the sign that it's time to shop for a new one.

I think this line of "logic" flummoxes me more than probably any other spendy one. Why is this? When you own something outright, what makes that the time to go into debt again? I've never gotten a straight answer except one time, and they said that they wanted to get another car payment before they started spending the money they were spending on a car on other things and wouldn't have it to spend on a car payment.

Just Joe

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #90 on: July 01, 2020, 02:45:29 PM »
'Cause the old car will start breaking down just about the same time it is paid off dontcha know?

Yeah, pretty common logic among some people we know. Also, the folks that replace cars every two to three years for reasons. Always different reasons, but reasons. ;)

We keep cars forever (like 20 years forever) and I really like not having a payment. Sure, we'll have a few repairs but it never amounts to much because we DIY everything.

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #91 on: July 02, 2020, 05:56:52 AM »
'Cause the old car will start breaking down just about the same time it is paid off dontcha know?

Yeah, pretty common logic among some people we know. Also, the folks that replace cars every two to three years for reasons. Always different reasons, but reasons. ;)

We keep cars forever (like 20 years forever) and I really like not having a payment. Sure, we'll have a few repairs but it never amounts to much because we DIY everything.

You're right. It is very common which makes it even more depressing to me. I guess in fairness the guy who said that to me deserves some credit because he was being intellectually honest. He knew his family would hedonically adapt to the greater amount of disposable income, so he wanted to avoid that from happening. I have and continue to make many financial mistakes, but thankfully cars is something we have done reasonably well with.

DadJokes

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #92 on: July 02, 2020, 06:21:41 AM »
I recently had dinner with an old friend. She says that her family can't afford college for the kids, its just too expensive. 5 minutes later talking about putting 2 of her kids on travel sports teams. "But it's only $3000 per year each. They could probably get a college scholarship." I asked how much it would be all in. She didn't even calculate all the money to be spent on gas, hotels, food etc.

My parents fell for this scheme with my younger sister, who played travel soccer. After spending thousands of dollars and every weekend on soccer, the scholarships that my sister actually landed didn't even cover that much, and they had to take out loans for the rest of her tuition. They would have been better off saving throughout the years and cutting a check for college. Selling people on the scholarship idea really gets a lot of them hooked.

I heard a related story on a podcast recently (Stacking Benjamins).

Pre-teen son is supposed to try out for traveling soccer team. However, he stays the night with friends the night before, doesn't sleep, and is miserable the day of tryouts. Dad decides not to take him to tryouts because the kid doesn't want to go.

That evening, dad gets a message on the answering machine (paraphrasing): "Hey So-and-So, we really liked what we saw out of Jr. at the tryout today and wanted to offer him a spot on the team."

WerKater

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #93 on: July 02, 2020, 07:33:04 AM »
'Cause the old car will start breaking down just about the same time it is paid off dontcha know?

Yeah, pretty common logic among some people we know. Also, the folks that replace cars every two to three years for reasons. Always different reasons, but reasons. ;)

We keep cars forever (like 20 years forever) and I really like not having a payment. Sure, we'll have a few repairs but it never amounts to much because we DIY everything.
Even if you don't do much yourself (because you have two left hands, like me), some repairs are still way the fuck cheaper than buying a stupid new clown car all the time. Especially if we are talking about 6-8 year old cars.

Wolfpack Mustachian

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #94 on: July 02, 2020, 11:24:38 AM »
'Cause the old car will start breaking down just about the same time it is paid off dontcha know?

Yeah, pretty common logic among some people we know. Also, the folks that replace cars every two to three years for reasons. Always different reasons, but reasons. ;)

We keep cars forever (like 20 years forever) and I really like not having a payment. Sure, we'll have a few repairs but it never amounts to much because we DIY everything.
Even if you don't do much yourself (because you have two left hands, like me), some repairs are still way the fuck cheaper than buying a stupid new clown car all the time. Especially if we are talking about 6-8 year old cars.

This is very true. Or buy a reasonable used car of a brand that tends to be higher quality. I've spent <4k on a Honda van and about 6k on a Prius, for example, both of which are lasting me well despite being pretty old. I say this because sometimes I see this on the other end - i.e. people willing to spend 3K or so to fix a vehicle, when they could get a solid used one with much less miles than they had on the one they are fixing for not much more (and they have the money to spend, so it's not a matter of I just don't have 500 bucks more or whatever). It's always a trade off, but I think it comes down to people thinking that spending 4k or less means you have to get a piece of crap. Trying to get a car for 500 bucks, yeah, probably junk, but there's a huge range of cars that are affordable and will last. You don't have to buy a 2 year old used car for 15,000 or whatever.

Cassie

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #95 on: July 02, 2020, 11:58:06 AM »
We bought a used motor home in 2007. A year later gas prices went up and RV parks kept getting more expensive. We used it to camp with friends until retiring in 2012 and planning to travel for a year. A month was all we could stand. It was 27 ft and had no popouts.  We took it out on 3 one month trips. The rest of the time it sat. Finally I convinced my husband to sell it as all our friends quit camping and it was just sitting there. We paid 14k and sold for 5.5k. 

talltexan

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #96 on: July 02, 2020, 12:36:13 PM »
I have a niece in travel cheer. That is, they aren't cheering for anything, ever, they just travel around competing. I find it ironically depressing.

The nice thing about travel sports is that far more kids can participate than would be able to in the traditional system. The down side to that is, it is more about buying your way onto the team.

Their family usually pays for it, at least in part, by working the concessions at an affiliated venue. The fact that the venue probably won't open this year, the fact that they probably won't be allowed to travel this year, the fact that the sole breadwinner was furloughed at the time the gym reopened, has not put a damper on paying for the training itself.

@ixtap , I actually think it's good for "cheer" to elevate it to the central sport, rather than making it a side-event at football or basketball games. Recognizing the athletes in their own right seems positive.

RainyDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #97 on: July 02, 2020, 01:05:20 PM »
More things my anti-Mustachian friends have said:

"You don't have an InstaPot??  We have TWO and are getting a third!"

It's a family of 4 so maybe they need two, but three??  I don't know, I can't fathom having more than one of any appliance. 

clarkfan1979

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #98 on: July 02, 2020, 03:40:52 PM »
My in-laws are really starting to piss me off. Over the past 6-12 months they have been giving my wife (their daughter) a really hard sell to buy a new car because her car is more than 10 years old. She has a 2007 Honda CRV with 150,000 miles. She bought it new in 2008 and has taken really good care of it. My wife stuck up for herself and has simply said multiple times, "I don't want a car payment" 

Her parents are 65 years old and would like to retire, but can't because they do not have enough money. Maybe part of the problem is that they have 3 car payments? They have a 2015 Dodge diesel truck ($55,000), 2018 Honda Pilot ($30,000) and 2020 Jeep Rubicon ($40,000). Working has been really hard on their health over the past 2 years. They work at a grocery store as a stocking manager and check-out clerk.

Father in law works 48 hours/week. Mother in law works 40 hours/week. They both get 4 weeks of paid vacation, so their total hours/week average around 81 hours/week. Their combined annual income is probably around 90,000/year.

We make around the same amount (90,000/year), but we work half as much because we value our health and time and not new cars. I average 25 hours/week of work and my wife averages 15 hours/week. This is 40 hours/week total combined.

I really do not care how they live their life. I strongly believe in, "To each their own." However, I am dumbfounded that they feel the need to tell us how to live our lives and their path is the better way. In my opinion, their life sucks.

Wrenchturner

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #99 on: July 03, 2020, 12:14:57 AM »
My in-laws are really starting to piss me off. Over the past 6-12 months they have been giving my wife (their daughter) a really hard sell to buy a new car because her car is more than 10 years old. She has a 2007 Honda CRV with 150,000 miles. She bought it new in 2008 and has taken really good care of it. My wife stuck up for herself and has simply said multiple times, "I don't want a car payment" 

Her parents are 65 years old and would like to retire, but can't because they do not have enough money. Maybe part of the problem is that they have 3 car payments? They have a 2015 Dodge diesel truck ($55,000), 2018 Honda Pilot ($30,000) and 2020 Jeep Rubicon ($40,000). Working has been really hard on their health over the past 2 years. They work at a grocery store as a stocking manager and check-out clerk.

Father in law works 48 hours/week. Mother in law works 40 hours/week. They both get 4 weeks of paid vacation, so their total hours/week average around 81 hours/week. Their combined annual income is probably around 90,000/year.

We make around the same amount (90,000/year), but we work half as much because we value our health and time and not new cars. I average 25 hours/week of work and my wife averages 15 hours/week. This is 40 hours/week total combined.

I really do not care how they live their life. I strongly believe in, "To each their own." However, I am dumbfounded that they feel the need to tell us how to live our lives and their path is the better way. In my opinion, their life sucks.

I am feeling equally angered and saddened by your story.