Author Topic: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say  (Read 11944 times)

RainyDay

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Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« on: June 10, 2020, 08:28:25 AM »
The other day my good friend was telling me that her engagement ring was "worth" $10k.  She's been married 26 years, so it was purchased a while back!

BUT.  She doesn't like to wear it in case she loses it, so her hubby bought her a Tiffany engagement ring for "only" $250 so it "doesn't matter if she loses it." 

My eyes nearly popped out of my head, but I managed not to say a word.

What do your friends say that astound you??

Chris22

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2020, 08:49:02 AM »
The biggest thing flagging my bullshit meter is the “$250 Tiffany engagement ring.”  Yeah no. She might have some Tiffany sterling silver ring she wears (their web site starts rings at $175) but Tiffany engagement (diamond) rings start at at least 10x that if not more.

RainyDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #2 on: June 10, 2020, 08:55:37 AM »
The biggest thing flagging my bullshit meter is the “$250 Tiffany engagement ring.”  Yeah no. She might have some Tiffany sterling silver ring she wears (their web site starts rings at $175) but Tiffany engagement (diamond) rings start at at least 10x that if not more.

I had no idea!  I've never shopped there and just took her at her word.  No idea what the real truth is...I've never looked at her finger and she wasn't wearing it during the discussion. 

MudPuppy

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #3 on: June 10, 2020, 09:06:32 AM »
It might just be the type of setting rather than the origin.


A friend bought a tour bus style RV because the regular RV was “a little cramped”

AMandM

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #4 on: June 10, 2020, 10:05:10 AM »
When I lived in a small town in a moderately touristy region, I had a neighbour who bought a big new RV to go camping with. It had more mod cons than my house--literally. We didn't have a microwave, satellite TV, or clothes dryer, but it did.

The she discovered her car wasn't powerful enough to tow the RV. While she waited a year until she could afford (i.e. she could get approved for a loan to buy) an SUV, the RV sat on the campground in town all summer.

Just Joe

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #5 on: June 10, 2020, 01:19:51 PM »
I see RV trailers parked all the time. Some don't look like they've moved in ages. Were not cheap when new. Don't know why anyone would park a $45K toy in the backyard and ignore it so.

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #6 on: June 10, 2020, 01:27:59 PM »
I see RV trailers parked all the time. Some don't look like they've moved in ages. Were not cheap when new. Don't know why anyone would park a $45K toy in the backyard and ignore it so.

If you ask, they will often complain that they tried to sell it, but they couldn't get what they had put in, so they let it rot, instead! Same thing happens with boats.

LaineyAZ

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2020, 01:34:06 PM »
"There's more to life than just going to work and paying bills."  Which is what they think being Mustachian means.

Just Joe

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2020, 01:46:03 PM »
All the excuses for their purchases. They bought it - own the decision. Phones, cars, houses, etc.

Of course if they are just enthusiastic about their purchase and just want to tell you all about it - I let them with a smile.

Some of us are just like 9 year olds and proud of our toys. (me too sometimes)

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2020, 01:58:01 PM »
"There's more to life than just going to work and paying bills."  Which is what they think being Mustachian means.

All the people complaining about COVID restrictions "This isn't living!"

I mean, if you are isolated with an abuser or suffering a mental breakdown, but I only saw that phrase from middle to upper class folks who wanted to hang out at the yacht club and go out to dinner.

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Sugaree

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #10 on: June 10, 2020, 02:30:25 PM »
I see RV trailers parked all the time. Some don't look like they've moved in ages. Were not cheap when new. Don't know why anyone would park a $45K toy in the backyard and ignore it so.

In my parents case, they bought it (used, thankfully) around 2004-2005 when gas was still relatively cheap.  They managed to unload it for about what they paid for it shortly before gas hit $4/gal, but even in the $3/gal range, it was just cheaper and easier to go stay at a hotel if they wanted to go more than about 300 miles away.  Especially for weekend trips, which is what they envisioned when they bought it.

BDWW

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #11 on: June 10, 2020, 02:57:53 PM »
I see RV trailers parked all the time. Some don't look like they've moved in ages. Were not cheap when new. Don't know why anyone would park a $45K toy in the backyard and ignore it so.

In my parents case, they bought it (used, thankfully) around 2004-2005 when gas was still relatively cheap.  They managed to unload it for about what they paid for it shortly before gas hit $4/gal, but even in the $3/gal range, it was just cheaper and easier to go stay at a hotel if they wanted to go more than about 300 miles away.  Especially for weekend trips, which is what they envisioned when they bought it.

I haven't ever seen these hotels in the woods... I must be doing something wrong.*

*with my 2004 camp trailer purchased for $4k several year ago.

MudPuppy

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #12 on: June 10, 2020, 03:08:18 PM »

Some of us are just like 9 year olds and proud of our toys. (me too sometimes)

I easily resist all toys. Pay no attention to the three large dogs behind the curtain.

Steeze

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #13 on: June 10, 2020, 03:35:39 PM »
"You can't just eat beans and rice all the time, you have to live a little, take your wife out to a nice dinner!"

"By the time you have an appetizers, entree, desert, and a few drinks, tax and tip - there is no way you are getting out of there for less than $100-200 a person"

"Of course you can never order the house wine, and any decent wine on the menu is always over a $100 a bottle"

"I didn't feel like taking the subway so I just took an Uber home instead"

"I can't afford to put anything in the 401k to get the match"

foghorn

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #14 on: June 10, 2020, 03:38:11 PM »
A depreciating assest (like a car) is somehow an investment.

Not (I mean refusing) to look at interest on a loan or upkeep costs on an item as part of the cost of owning that thing.

Convinced that some windfall is just around the corner that will solve all their money problems.

If investing, they think mutual funds are silly - just pick that one right stock. 

Somewhere along the line heard a motivational speaker state that you "should invest 15% of your income each year in yourself".  Then decding this means you should go out and buy a bunch of crap and call it "investing in myself".


Steeze

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #15 on: June 10, 2020, 03:41:49 PM »
A depreciating assest (like a car) is somehow an investment.

Not (I mean refusing) to look at interest on a loan or upkeep costs on an item as part of the cost of owning that thing.

Convinced that some windfall is just around the corner that will solve all their money problems.

If investing, they think mutual funds are silly - just pick that one right stock. 

Somewhere along the line heard a motivational speaker state that you "should invest 15% of your income each year in yourself".  Then decding this means you should go out and buy a bunch of crap and call it "investing in myself".

Wait - "invest in yourself" doesn't mean update wardrobe ?

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #16 on: June 10, 2020, 04:21:26 PM »
A depreciating assest (like a car) is somehow an investment.

Not (I mean refusing) to look at interest on a loan or upkeep costs on an item as part of the cost of owning that thing.

Convinced that some windfall is just around the corner that will solve all their money problems.

If investing, they think mutual funds are silly - just pick that one right stock. 

Somewhere along the line heard a motivational speaker state that you "should invest 15% of your income each year in yourself".  Then decding this means you should go out and buy a bunch of crap and call it "investing in myself".

Wait - "invest in yourself" doesn't mean update wardrobe ?

Nah, that's tangible. Investments are things like mani - pedis, blow outs, threading...

Sugaree

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2020, 04:28:07 AM »
I see RV trailers parked all the time. Some don't look like they've moved in ages. Were not cheap when new. Don't know why anyone would park a $45K toy in the backyard and ignore it so.

In my parents case, they bought it (used, thankfully) around 2004-2005 when gas was still relatively cheap.  They managed to unload it for about what they paid for it shortly before gas hit $4/gal, but even in the $3/gal range, it was just cheaper and easier to go stay at a hotel if they wanted to go more than about 300 miles away.  Especially for weekend trips, which is what they envisioned when they bought it.

I haven't ever seen these hotels in the woods... I must be doing something wrong.*

*with my 2004 camp trailer purchased for $4k several year ago.


I didn't think people who bought the really, really big ones actually dared to take them out in the woods.

RainyDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #18 on: June 11, 2020, 06:10:27 AM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

talltexan

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #19 on: June 11, 2020, 06:17:53 AM »
"It's a once in a lifetime opportunity"

OtherJen

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #20 on: June 11, 2020, 08:18:00 AM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

MayDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #21 on: June 11, 2020, 08:36:33 AM »
I see RV trailers parked all the time. Some don't look like they've moved in ages. Were not cheap when new. Don't know why anyone would park a $45K toy in the backyard and ignore it so.

If you ask, they will often complain that they tried to sell it, but they couldn't get what they had put in, so they let it rot, instead! Same thing happens with boats.

My in laws have an RV. Well, now they have a rotten pile of trash that we'll have to deal with when they die.

2005: RV is at least a few years old, they use it maybe 1 week a year to go to a horse show.

2010: I haven't seen it used in 5 years. They swear when FIL retires they'll use it

2015: FIL retires. RV is now starting to degrade and needs work. It could still be sold for 1000$ maybe. FIL talks about fixing it or selling it but does neither.

2020: it is now a trash heap that he'll have to pay money to get rid of.

Money was never an issue. They just don't bother getting rid of anything, ever. Their unfinished basement is full of random stuff they can't be bothered to dispose of.

Chris22

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #22 on: June 11, 2020, 08:43:18 AM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.

But a lot of other people, like me, are extroverts and thrive on interaction with lots of people, so quarantine feels extremely restrictive and suffocating. It has nothing to do with “luxuries” unless you consider human interaction a luxury.

martyconlonontherun

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #23 on: June 11, 2020, 08:49:36 AM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.

But a lot of other people, like me, are extroverts and thrive on interaction with lots of people, so quarantine feels extremely restrictive and suffocating. It has nothing to do with “luxuries” unless you consider human interaction a luxury.
Yeah, quarantine sucks for a lot of people with extended families and large friend groups. Yeah, its great i see my wife and kid but it would also be great to see my parents, cousins, friends etc. I could care less about a restaurant but it would be great to host am open invite cookout.

Chris22

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #24 on: June 11, 2020, 08:59:23 AM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.

But a lot of other people, like me, are extroverts and thrive on interaction with lots of people, so quarantine feels extremely restrictive and suffocating. It has nothing to do with “luxuries” unless you consider human interaction a luxury.
Yeah, quarantine sucks for a lot of people with extended families and large friend groups. Yeah, its great i see my wife and kid but it would also be great to see my parents, cousins, friends etc. I could care less about a restaurant but it would be great to host am open invite cookout.

Yup. Almost every night and weekend in the (Normal) summer we hop on our bikes and ride to the playground/park/pool and meet up with friends. All of that is closed in IL now so no can do. We have the occasional driveway fire pit with neighbors, but not being able to see more people sucks.

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #25 on: June 11, 2020, 09:29:43 AM »
I still think there is a long way between "This sucks" and "this is not living."


SheWhoWalksAtLunch

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #26 on: June 11, 2020, 10:11:42 AM »
I still think there is a long way between "This sucks" and "this is not living."

There's also the priviledge filter to consider.  When some people are homeless or unsafe, and others are hungry, complaining about being stuck at home with your luxury goods and unintended weight gain is not a good look.
« Last Edit: June 11, 2020, 10:13:17 AM by SheWhoWalksAtLunch »

Chris22

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #27 on: June 11, 2020, 10:16:56 AM »
I still think there is a long way between "This sucks" and "this is not living."

There's also the priviledge filter to consider.  When some people are homeless or unsafe, and others are hungry, complaining about being stuck at home with your luxury goods and unintended weight gain is not a good look.

The one-upping of misery is tiresome and tedious. Of course there are people in worse situations, but that doesn’t mean people’s situations can’t be uncomfortable. Misery isn’t a contest, are you one of those people who respond to “man I’m tired, I got 4 hours of sleep last night” with “wow, 4 hours, I only got 3!”  You can’t both be tired??? 

OtherJen

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #28 on: June 11, 2020, 11:10:32 AM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.

But a lot of other people, like me, are extroverts and thrive on interaction with lots of people, so quarantine feels extremely restrictive and suffocating. It has nothing to do with “luxuries” unless you consider human interaction a luxury.

Yes. I am far more of an extrovert than I realized, and all of my volunteer work is either impossible right now or must be done via online platforms (and I do a lot of volunteer work). So now I spend a lot of time on a screen in my 1000-square foot house or in my small yard, and only go out for groceries. I haven't seen friends in person for 3 months. It's not great for my mental health, but like @ixtap said, there's a big gap between "this sucks" and "not living."

We're Mustachians, right? Aren't we supposed to embrace discomfort? This is temporary and ultimately intended to protect the elderly and less healthy among us.

SheWhoWalksAtLunch

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #29 on: June 11, 2020, 12:41:08 PM »
I still think there is a long way between "This sucks" and "this is not living."

There's also the priviledge filter to consider.  When some people are homeless or unsafe, and others are hungry, complaining about being stuck at home with your luxury goods and unintended weight gain is not a good look.

The one-upping of misery is tiresome and tedious. Of course there are people in worse situations, but that doesn’t mean people’s situations can’t be uncomfortable. Misery isn’t a contest, are you one of those people who respond to “man I’m tired, I got 4 hours of sleep last night” with “wow, 4 hours, I only got 3!”  You can’t both be tired???

Nope, I'm not saying it’s a contest.  Both people in your example need to go home and take a nap.  I'm supporting @ixtap who I believe is saying those WHO HAVE need to be more thoughtful about complaining in front of those WHO HAVE NOT. 

Chris22

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #30 on: June 11, 2020, 12:50:43 PM »
I still think there is a long way between "This sucks" and "this is not living."

There's also the priviledge filter to consider.  When some people are homeless or unsafe, and others are hungry, complaining about being stuck at home with your luxury goods and unintended weight gain is not a good look.

The one-upping of misery is tiresome and tedious. Of course there are people in worse situations, but that doesn’t mean people’s situations can’t be uncomfortable. Misery isn’t a contest, are you one of those people who respond to “man I’m tired, I got 4 hours of sleep last night” with “wow, 4 hours, I only got 3!”  You can’t both be tired???

Nope, I'm not saying it’s a contest.  Both people in your example need to go home and take a nap.  I'm supporting @ixtap who I believe is saying those WHO HAVE need to be more thoughtful about complaining in front of those WHO HAVE NOT.

Where is the evidence they were complaining in front of someone homeless, etc? 

SheWhoWalksAtLunch

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #31 on: June 11, 2020, 01:03:25 PM »
I still think there is a long way between "This sucks" and "this is not living."

There's also the priviledge filter to consider.  When some people are homeless or unsafe, and others are hungry, complaining about being stuck at home with your luxury goods and unintended weight gain is not a good look.

The one-upping of misery is tiresome and tedious. Of course there are people in worse situations, but that doesn’t mean people’s situations can’t be uncomfortable. Misery isn’t a contest, are you one of those people who respond to “man I’m tired, I got 4 hours of sleep last night” with “wow, 4 hours, I only got 3!”  You can’t both be tired???

Nope, I'm not saying it’s a contest.  Both people in your example need to go home and take a nap.  I'm supporting @ixtap who I believe is saying those WHO HAVE need to be more thoughtful about complaining in front of those WHO HAVE NOT.

Where is the evidence they were complaining in front of someone homeless, etc?

Upthread:
"There's more to life than just going to work and paying bills."  Which is what they think being Mustachian means.

All the people complaining about COVID restrictions "This isn't living!"

I mean, if you are isolated with an abuser or suffering a mental breakdown, but I only saw that phrase from middle to upper class folks who wanted to hang out at the yacht club and go out to dinner.

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #32 on: June 11, 2020, 01:35:00 PM »
For the record, I wasn't at all expecting comparisons to those who are worse off.

I do think that, in general, humans who are in safe conditions should be able to make the most of it for some period of time, even if it isn't their ideal. I even support people leaving their safe conditions to try to carve out something better. I don't think that is what is going to happen if we listen to those who say that they are going to congregate and those who care about public health can just stay home if they don't like it. I think that response is going to make it much worse for everyone.

Chris22

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #33 on: June 11, 2020, 01:39:24 PM »
For the record, I wasn't at all expecting comparisons to those who are worse off.

I do think that, in general, humans who are in safe conditions should be able to make the most of it for some period of time, even if it isn't their ideal. I even support people leaving their safe conditions to try to carve out something better. I don't think that is what is going to happen if we listen to those who say that they are going to congregate and those who care about public health can just stay home if they don't like it. I think that response is going to make it much worse for everyone.

But can we agree what we are doing is not indefinitely sustainable? 

And if so, by what metric will we relax?  That’s what’s frustrating is how the goalposts keep moving, first it was “flatten the curve” and now it’s...what?  Zero deaths?  A vaccine?  At some point life is going to have to go on, one way or another.

MudPuppy

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #34 on: June 11, 2020, 01:49:10 PM »
The problem with reopening too early is it re-bumps the curve. We HAD started to flatten the curve. Then many areas reopened too early. And frankly, the public shows an astonishing lack of interest in taking the precautions (masking, distancing, limiting unnecessary outings) needed to make that reopening a success.

ixtap

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #35 on: June 11, 2020, 01:51:13 PM »
For the record, I wasn't at all expecting comparisons to those who are worse off.

I do think that, in general, humans who are in safe conditions should be able to make the most of it for some period of time, even if it isn't their ideal. I even support people leaving their safe conditions to try to carve out something better. I don't think that is what is going to happen if we listen to those who say that they are going to congregate and those who care about public health can just stay home if they don't like it. I think that response is going to make it much worse for everyone.

But can we agree what we are doing is not indefinitely sustainable? 

And if so, by what metric will we relax?  That’s what’s frustrating is how the goalposts keep moving, first it was “flatten the curve” and now it’s...what?  Zero deaths?  A vaccine?  At some point life is going to have to go on, one way or another.

Life didn't stop. That is my whole point.

So from that totally different premise, the question becomes,  what does a path forward look like.

One says, we have to get back to where we were. That was life.

The other says, life is change, what changes are in store next?

Chris22

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #36 on: June 11, 2020, 02:01:32 PM »
I guess I agree with the whole “huddling in your house with only direct family” isn’t living.

Isn’t the whole MMM thing about calculating risk and not worrying about very small ones?  I would argue for a younger family in good health, sheltering in place indefinitely is a very poor calculation of risk, akin to not riding a bike because you might get hit by a car.

Avoiding elderly family members or those in poor health seems like fair aversion to risk, in contrast.

OtherJen

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #37 on: June 11, 2020, 04:24:17 PM »
I guess I agree with the whole “huddling in your house with only direct family” isn’t living.

Isn’t the whole MMM thing about calculating risk and not worrying about very small ones?  I would argue for a younger family in good health, sheltering in place indefinitely is a very poor calculation of risk, akin to not riding a bike because you might get hit by a car.

Avoiding elderly family members or those in poor health seems like fair aversion to risk, in contrast.

Except it wasn't indefinitely. It's been at most 3 months, and that phase has ended or is ending in most places. I don't know where you live, but here, huddling in our houses seemed like a really smart idea when the hospitals were at capacity and the morgues and funeral homes were overloaded. That's no longer the case, so we have readjusted.

talltexan

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #38 on: June 12, 2020, 09:46:49 AM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.

But a lot of other people, like me, are extroverts and thrive on interaction with lots of people, so quarantine feels extremely restrictive and suffocating. It has nothing to do with “luxuries” unless you consider human interaction a luxury.

@Chris22 , I don't know if you've seen the other posts where this is discussed, but the INTJ type (under Myers-Briggs) is by far the modal type for MMM forum participants.

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #39 on: June 12, 2020, 01:13:17 PM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.

But a lot of other people, like me, are extroverts and thrive on interaction with lots of people, so quarantine feels extremely restrictive and suffocating. It has nothing to do with “luxuries” unless you consider human interaction a luxury.

@Chris22 , I don't know if you've seen the other posts where this is discussed, but the INTJ type (under Myers-Briggs) is by far the modal type for MMM forum participants.

One of the rare situations in which we're the majority.

I almost feel like exploiting or dominating somebody now. But that would require effort, so I won't.

Gremlin

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #40 on: June 12, 2020, 11:29:58 PM »

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.


OT but related to this comment.

I have two junior teenage Gremlins.  Master Gremlin is the hardest of hardcore introverts.  Little Miss Gremlin, on the other hand, is our out there extrovert.  Funnily enough, it was my introvert son who most desperately wanted to get back to face-to-face learning at school, whilst my extrovert daughter could have stayed at home forever.  She found she still had full access to all her friends all the time through video calls and social media and was just as connected as ever.  In comparison, Master Gremlin really felt the pangs of loneliness as the one-on-one social connection of just "being" with another introverted friend or two had been taken away.  Social media and video calls were no substitute for him and just sitting there on a video call in silence was a driver of awkwardness rather than just an experience you can have when you're there in real life.  So I agree that your comment is true in a sense, but really interesting to observe how that played out for the younger generation.

Fomerly known as something

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #41 on: June 14, 2020, 06:12:41 AM »
I guess I agree with the whole “huddling in your house with only direct family” isn’t living.

Isn’t the whole MMM thing about calculating risk and not worrying about very small ones?  I would argue for a younger family in good health, sheltering in place indefinitely is a very poor calculation of risk, akin to not riding a bike because you might get hit by a car.

Avoiding elderly family members or those in poor health seems like fair aversion to risk, in contrast.

Except it wasn't indefinitely. It's been at most 3 months, and that phase has ended or is ending in most places. I don't know where you live, but here, huddling in our houses seemed like a really smart idea when the hospitals were at capacity and the morgues and funeral homes were overloaded. That's no longer the case, so we have readjusted.

And it’s not about individuals health, it’s about public health.  Currently as my state open, my county is the one being watch most closely, not because we have the highest infection rate, but because we are seeing the highest rate of ICU use.  It’s about the ability to treat the public as a whole, not individuals.

AnnaGrowsAMustache

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #42 on: June 14, 2020, 12:55:56 PM »
I still think there is a long way between "This sucks" and "this is not living."

There's also the priviledge filter to consider.  When some people are homeless or unsafe, and others are hungry, complaining about being stuck at home with your luxury goods and unintended weight gain is not a good look.

The one-upping of misery is tiresome and tedious. Of course there are people in worse situations, but that doesn’t mean people’s situations can’t be uncomfortable. Misery isn’t a contest, are you one of those people who respond to “man I’m tired, I got 4 hours of sleep last night” with “wow, 4 hours, I only got 3!”  You can’t both be tired???

Agreed. Misery isn't relative, people respond in different ways to the same stimulus and all responses are valid.

On the other hand, some people could afford a little perspective from time to time!

Sugaree

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #43 on: June 15, 2020, 05:58:12 AM »
I guess I agree with the whole “huddling in your house with only direct family” isn’t living.

Isn’t the whole MMM thing about calculating risk and not worrying about very small ones?  I would argue for a younger family in good health, sheltering in place indefinitely is a very poor calculation of risk, akin to not riding a bike because you might get hit by a car.

Avoiding elderly family members or those in poor health seems like fair aversion to risk, in contrast.

Except it wasn't indefinitely. It's been at most 3 months, and that phase has ended or is ending in most places. I don't know where you live, but here, huddling in our houses seemed like a really smart idea when the hospitals were at capacity and the morgues and funeral homes were overloaded. That's no longer the case, so we have readjusted.

And it’s not about individuals health, it’s about public health.  Currently as my state open, my county is the one being watch most closely, not because we have the highest infection rate, but because we are seeing the highest rate of ICU use.  It’s about the ability to treat the public as a whole, not individuals.

I live in the bible belt, where one would think that "Love Thy Neighbor" would kind of be a big thing.  But yet everyone bitches about wearing a mask. 

AMandM

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #44 on: June 15, 2020, 07:46:58 AM »
Back on topic:

"I'm tired of this" said while throwing away something nearly unused.

solon

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #45 on: June 15, 2020, 09:37:46 AM »
"I'm tired of this" said while throwing away something nearly unused.

It must not be sparking joy any more.

Sun Hat

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #46 on: June 17, 2020, 01:21:32 PM »
@Chris22 , I don't know if you've seen the other posts where this is discussed, but the INTJ type (under Myers-Briggs) is by far the modal type for MMM forum participants.

One of the rare situations in which we're the majority.

I almost feel like exploiting or dominating somebody now. But that would require effort, so I won't.

You crack me up!


Just Joe

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #47 on: June 17, 2020, 01:31:29 PM »

I'm sorry that cooking in your newly remodeled kitchen and hanging out with your family is so miserable.

Best quote ever.  I live in a HCOL area and hear constant complaints about how hard it is to be at home.  From people in luxury 4000 sq ft houses on 5 acres.  You're home with the family you supposedly love!  With every amenity known to man!

Yes. If you are this miserable when your distractions are stripped away from the luxurious life you've created, maybe it's time to take a close look at your life and make some changes.

A lot of MMMers are hardcore introverts so quarantine is a gift to them.

But a lot of other people, like me, are extroverts and thrive on interaction with lots of people, so quarantine feels extremely restrictive and suffocating. It has nothing to do with “luxuries” unless you consider human interaction a luxury.

I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

facepalm

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #48 on: June 18, 2020, 04:20:05 AM »
Co-worker: "We're buying a new RV because we want to save money on our travelling expenses."

Me: (lying through my teeth) That's awesome!

RainyDay

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Re: Things your anti-Mustachian friends say
« Reply #49 on: June 18, 2020, 05:27:47 AM »
I hate to say this when so many people have been sick and died - but this has been the best spring of my adult life. Never before have I had this much time to enjoy being at home and outside. Spring is usually so busy its over before I notice.

I start most morns with coffee or ice water as the mood strikes me - and sitting on the front porch while the dog patrols the yard for things to bark at. Time with the family. Time for tinkering. Its brought us closer. Espeically our kids. Even work has been better in some ways. WFH and more autonomy to get done whatever needs doing.

Yeah I get it, lots of unhappy people out there and I want to virus to end too. We have family and friends we have not visited in person since Christmas. We'd love to get out of town too.

Same here.  I feel awful because there's a lot of suffering out there right now, but this has been the best spring of my life, too.  I'm an introvert, had a loooong commute, and lots of boring-ass meetings.  Now I get to be home, commute down the hallway, and 80% of those useless meetings have been cancelled.  Plus I can go outside for short periods of time to enjoy the day, take walks, and have SO MUCH MORE TIME.  I feel semi-retired!