Author Topic: The Delusion of Young Lawyers  (Read 25490 times)

anonlawyer

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The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« on: September 24, 2012, 10:40:26 PM »
As a lawyer myself, I often read forums that deal with attorney life.  Here is a gem of a thread I thought you'd appreciate:

http://autoadmit.com/thread.php?thread_id=2061031&mc=62&forum_id=2#21650722

It shows the absolute delusional mindset of today's big firm associates.  A lot of my friends are like some of the clueless posters. 


sol

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #1 on: September 24, 2012, 11:13:04 PM »
A choice excerpt:

Quote
Date: September 24th, 2012 9:10 PM
Author: .,.,....,.,..,.,:,,:,...,:::,....,,:,.,.:...,:.::

That's about $300k take home annually

You'll want to put $100k in savings each year to have any chance of a good retirement

$100k on mortgage, property tax, maintenance, landscaping, cleaning for a $1.5M house. You won't have a palace for that in any high col area, just a decent 5000sqft+ place

$50k on two decent $100kish cars. $25k if you want to drive low-end luxury vehicles

That leaves $50k for all other expenses: food, clothing, insurance, vacations, private school for the kids. It's barely enough without kids, and not nearly enough with kids

$500k isn't enough to live large

Saving mom

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #2 on: September 25, 2012, 05:28:09 AM »
I worked with people that think along these lines. Talk about how it's so hard to save and in my head I am screaming "it's easy if you don't buy the estate with a tennis court in the best school district and yet still send your kids to private school". I have friends who are spending about $45K per year just on private school tuition and they don't live in New York or similarly high COL areas.

Irishmam

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #3 on: September 25, 2012, 05:57:06 AM »
Private school is not just for those who think they are rich. We pay because our local schools are failing the children, safety is a major concern with high volume narcotics, fights, etc. Private school is something we budget for and we cut back in other areas to prioritize this.
With regards to the OP, yes, these people are in cuckoo-land!! While many of us dream about income like that, that is something we won't see in this lifetime, so we will make the best of the hand we are dealt and enjoy ourselves along the way!

bo_knows

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #4 on: September 25, 2012, 06:31:15 AM »
Good christ.  If I was grossing $300k, I'm pretty sure I'd retire in 2 years.  I wonder if there are many of the mustachian mindset in the law/medical field.  I mean, if they were, they could retire in short fashion after paying off their ridiculous student loans (if they had them).

spider1204

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #5 on: September 25, 2012, 07:19:48 AM »
There's definitely at least one, but he's basically retired before even passing the bar exam.
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Angelfishtitan

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #6 on: September 25, 2012, 07:48:19 AM »
@sol: It just breaks my heart to see these lawyers suffer. 5000 sq ft barely gives you enough room to not rub elbows in your four person family. At least it keeps the cleaning costs down, those maids aren't cheap! I don't understand how real people can even think this way, bleh!

$100K/year on cars?!? Dear god, I don't even know how one could go through luxury cars that quickly. If you are spending a third of your salary on cars, no matter what level of income your are in, something needs to change.

There is only a couple things that I could see someone in a position of a lawyer spending large amounts of money on. One is clothes solely due to the whole nature of impressing people in a job like that, not necessarily the highest end clothes, but suits and such none the less. Sad that it matters, but in does in today's society. Still, we are only talking maybe like five times what a normal person spends at most. Other than that it is not very easy to find decent stuff that compares with the highest end stuff that a normal Joe would never be able to tell the difference.

As far as private school, it can be a good investment, but there are a ton of factors that would need to line up first. Is your school district really as bad as you think it is? Why do you live where you do and not somewhere with a better public school system? Is the money you save living where you are more than you have to spend on private school? I think a lot of people over estimate how bad public schools are, and how much a child's sucess really depends almost as much on the parents as the school system they are in.

AmbystomaOpacum

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #7 on: September 25, 2012, 08:07:55 AM »
A choice excerpt:

Quote
Date: September 24th, 2012 9:10 PM
Author: .,.,....,.,..,.,:,,:,...,:::,....,,:,.,.:...,:.::

That's about $300k take home annually

You'll want to put $100k in savings each year to have any chance of a good retirement

$100k on mortgage, property tax, maintenance, landscaping, cleaning for a $1.5M house. You won't have a palace for that in any high col area, just a decent 5000sqft+ place

$50k on two decent $100kish cars. $25k if you want to drive low-end luxury vehicles

That leaves $50k for all other expenses: food, clothing, insurance, vacations, private school for the kids. It's barely enough without kids, and not nearly enough with kids

$500k isn't enough to live large

This seems pretty likely a joke.

arebelspy

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #8 on: September 25, 2012, 08:16:44 AM »
This seems pretty likely a joke.

I'm guessing you don't know many high wager earners.

I'm betting that post was sincere.
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kkbmustang

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #9 on: September 25, 2012, 08:20:04 AM »
I'm an ex-biglaw lawyer. I worked in a firm with more than 600 lawyers in it, in a big downtown high rise. Pretty sure this poster wasn't joking. To say it was hard being around so many arrogant assholes with God complexes would be the understatement of the century. Thus, the "ex" part referenced above.

WaxOnWaxOff

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #10 on: September 25, 2012, 08:28:38 AM »
I agree with arebelspy and kkbmustang. As a recovering lawyer myself, I recognize many of my ex-colleagues in that post.

At my first job, one of the partners told me, "Don't bother trying to save any money your first year of practice. You'll have a lot of pent-up wants: new car, a nicer place, nice vacations, a new stereo system, better clothes." I'm glad I didn't listen to him.

I know I'm not as Mustachian as some people here (I do have a few luxury items I adore), but one of the reasons I'm in a good financial position now is because I focused my spending on what *I* love, not on what other people think I should have. And boy, did people have opinions, from where I should live to what car I should drive to where I should travel for vacations. I'm so glad I work with down-to-earth, normal people now.

tooqk4u22

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #11 on: September 25, 2012, 08:42:37 AM »
At my first job, one of the partners told me, "Don't bother trying to save any money your first year of practice. You'll have a lot of pent-up wants: new car, a nicer place, nice vacations, a new stereo system, better clothes." I'm glad I didn't listen to him.


Whenever we interview someone for a sales/production type of role and we narrow it down to a couple of qualified candidates it is almost always best to go with the person with the best clothes, luxury items, trip discussions, etc. because those are the people that NEED to produce to keep the hamster wheel going.....these people make my goal easier.

spider1204

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #12 on: September 25, 2012, 09:38:32 AM »
Quote
Quote
At my first job, one of the partners told me, "Don't bother trying to save any money your first year of practice. You'll have a lot of pent-up wants: new car, a nicer place, nice vacations, a new stereo system, better clothes." I'm glad I didn't listen to him.

Whenever we interview someone for a sales/production type of role and we narrow it down to a couple of qualified candidates it is almost always best to go with the person with the best clothes, luxury items, trip discussions, etc. because those are the people that NEED to produce to keep the hamster wheel going.....these people make my goal easier.

This is is probably why it's important to keep up appearances to get jobs or promotions, yet most people have no idea that this is why they are being judged on their appearances.

bo_knows

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #13 on: September 25, 2012, 09:47:30 AM »
At my first job, one of the partners told me, "Don't bother trying to save any money your first year of practice. You'll have a lot of pent-up wants: new car, a nicer place, nice vacations, a new stereo system, better clothes." I'm glad I didn't listen to him.


Whenever we interview someone for a sales/production type of role and we narrow it down to a couple of qualified candidates it is almost always best to go with the person with the best clothes, luxury items, trip discussions, etc. because those are the people that NEED to produce to keep the hamster wheel going.....these people make my goal easier.

For some reason, this makes me very sad.

totoro

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #14 on: September 25, 2012, 10:14:54 AM »
I'm a lawyer and my life is nothing like that.   I'm a sole practicioner working p-t in a social justice field.  I work 10-20 hours a week right now, mostly flat fee, and make a good living.  I run up against big firm lawyers sometimes.  I think they get trapped in the billable hours required to support overhead, partners and their salaries in the traditional law firm structure.  Yes, there is ego too, but, really, it is just culture that values overworking, kind of like a warrior mentality.  I have never seen the appeal, but I do believe a law career can be a great thing for work/life balance if you think outside the box.

Jamesqf

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #15 on: September 25, 2012, 12:47:04 PM »
...one of the reasons I'm in a good financial position now is because I focused my spending on what *I* love, not on what other people think I should have.

Exactly!  I'd even go further: a lot of that stuff other people think I should have is stuff I want very much NOT to have in my life. 

jp

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #16 on: September 26, 2012, 10:53:13 AM »
I am a lawyer.  People are stupid sometimes, regardless of their jobs.  These lawyers are just stupid.  They do not represent the field as a whole. 

igthebold

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #17 on: September 26, 2012, 11:00:55 AM »
I am a lawyer.  People are stupid sometimes, regardless of their jobs.  These lawyers are just stupid.  They do not represent the field as a whole.

Their stupidity merely evinces itself in a more extreme way than the stupidity of a programmer would (3000sf house, BMW, bacon-of-the-month club, ThinkGeek toys). The underlying principle is the same, I agree.

jp

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #18 on: September 26, 2012, 11:22:49 AM »
Their stupidity merely evinces itself in a more extreme way than the stupidity of a programmer would (3000sf house, BMW, bacon-of-the-month club, ThinkGeek toys). The underlying principle is the same, I agree.

I have seen people of all walks of life get caught up in really bizarre obsessions.  Speaking of programmers, I know one that basically spent his entire non-working life playing World of Warcraft... his wife temporarily left him, his kids were in trouble a school, and he nearly lost his job (because he was barely sleeping).  Stupid.  Caught up in something he felt was important .... these lawyers are the same.  They are caught up in a weird obsession with luxury spending.   

TwoWheels

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #19 on: September 26, 2012, 11:34:58 AM »
The first post made me laugh the hardest:

Quote
At $250K my life is a bit better than it was as a law clerk making $50K. I have a nicer apartment with in unit w/d, hardwood floors and lots of sunlight. I have an audi. I eat at fancy restaurants once a week. I buy more expensive clothing, and buy it more frequently. But my life does not feel that much greater.

Does it get way better at $500K?

"Guys, lately I've been buying more and more stuff. But I'm still not happier. What's wrong? Should I buy more stuff?" I pity this person.

Jamesqf

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #20 on: September 26, 2012, 12:20:38 PM »
I am a lawyer.  People are stupid sometimes, regardless of their jobs.  These lawyers are just stupid.  They do not represent the field as a whole.

I don't know about that.  Seems a perfect fit to the only young lawyer I know, who recently married the daughter of friends of mine.  So it's "Oh, we're going to have our wedding in Puerto Vallarta (or some such Mexican resort), so I'm sure you won't mind spending $X thousands to travel there for a week..."

jp

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #21 on: September 26, 2012, 12:52:05 PM »
I am a lawyer.  People are stupid sometimes, regardless of their jobs.  These lawyers are just stupid.  They do not represent the field as a whole.

I don't know about that.  Seems a perfect fit to the only young lawyer I know, who recently married the daughter of friends of mine.  So it's "Oh, we're going to have our wedding in Puerto Vallarta (or some such Mexican resort), so I'm sure you won't mind spending $X thousands to travel there for a week..."


Well there you have it. 

If one, then all.



TLV

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2012, 01:01:47 PM »
When I saw this thread title, I thought it would be in reference to all the law school students who take on 6-figure debt and then don't end up with a big-law salary to match it.

palvar

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #23 on: September 26, 2012, 02:33:53 PM »
Are they calling each other "breh"?  This has got to be a joke.

Jamesqf

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #24 on: September 26, 2012, 04:32:04 PM »
Well there you have it. 

If one, then all.

Not just one.  One more added to the already considerable count represented by that site :-)  Not all, but most?

jp

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #25 on: September 27, 2012, 07:55:51 AM »
Well there you have it. 

If one, then all.

Not just one.  One more added to the already considerable count represented by that site :-)  Not all, but most?

I really don't think the mindset is any more prevalent in the young lawyer crowd than any other young professional crowd.  Maybe it is more noticeable because there are a lot of lawyers, and they also sometimes have enough money to do some damage.  In all reality, most of the lawyers I know are pretty down to earth in terms of their spending vs. income.  If anything, having seen lives collapse and being supposed counselors, they are more conservative overall than other groups in terms of spending in my experience.  That said, I live in Indiana, not NYC. 

Doctors, now those are some spendy folks.  Never ever seen a doctor in an even moderately spendy lifestyle... always extravagant. 

grantmeaname

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #26 on: September 27, 2012, 10:39:53 AM »
Other than that James guy, you mean.

WaxOnWaxOff

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #27 on: September 27, 2012, 11:02:55 AM »
Talked to one of my ex-colleagues (who's still in BigLaw). He said, and I quote, "$1 million isn't that much for a house. The mortgage payment is what, only $5000?"

Yeah, we have very different definitions of the word "only."

kkbmustang

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #28 on: September 27, 2012, 03:24:28 PM »
WaxOnWaxOff-  Takes me back to the days I try to forget.

dragoncar

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #29 on: September 27, 2012, 07:25:43 PM »
At my first job, one of the partners told me, "Don't bother trying to save any money your first year of practice. You'll have a lot of pent-up wants: new car, a nicer place, nice vacations, a new stereo system, better clothes." I'm glad I didn't listen to him.


That's how they get you into the golden handcuffs.  Otherwise they spend 2 or 3 years training you, and you leave because you've already saved enough to retire in the country.

Sparky

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #30 on: September 28, 2012, 07:13:45 AM »
100k in cars per year? Must include your personal driver

pinkysmith

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #31 on: September 28, 2012, 07:50:42 AM »
I'd be wary of taking anything on that site seriously. It is fairly notorious for its racist, misogynistic posters and elaborate flame-posts.

I'm in biglaw now (and yes, I'm posting from work!) and while I would characterize many of my coworkers as being somewhat out of touch, I've thankfully never met a young associate who rises to the level of douche-baggery evidenced by that thread.

I have, however, had partners tell me in all seriousness that $15M "isn't that much money" while referring to a colleague at the firm who happened to win the lottery. I responded with dumbstruck silence.

Stacey

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #32 on: September 28, 2012, 09:41:58 AM »
At my first job, one of the partners told me, "Don't bother trying to save any money your first year of practice. You'll have a lot of pent-up wants: new car, a nicer place, nice vacations, a new stereo system, better clothes." I'm glad I didn't listen to him.


That's how they get you into the golden handcuffs.  Otherwise they spend 2 or 3 years training you, and you leave because you've already saved enough to retire in the country.

Dragoncar hit the nail on the head.  I'm in biglaw (for now) and I can't tell you the amount of times folks have inquired into when and where I'm purchasing a house.  And when others around me buy a (much larger than necessary) home or a second home, I've had the same inquiring folks tell me how happy they are because now they know that person will be around for a long time.  They've given up asking me - perhaps they've realized I'm a lost cause.  :)

WaxOnWaxOff

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #33 on: September 28, 2012, 11:21:22 AM »
The golden handcuff craziness isn't limited to law firms. When I was in-house, my boss told me that I should buy a Mercedes or an Audi. Why? Because the CEO had a Mercedes and an Audi. Um, dude, I work in a satellite office. How the hell would the CEO know what I drive in the first place?

grantmeaname

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #34 on: September 28, 2012, 04:07:25 PM »
Accounting smut rag Going Concern had a ball-and-chain article along this theme the other day.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2012, 06:55:35 AM by grantmeaname »

arebelspy

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #35 on: September 29, 2012, 10:10:28 PM »
It seems like these guys are pretty funny.  You all should lighten up.

I don't think they were trying to be funny, so it's not a matter of us "lightening up" - it's a matter of us chuckling sadly at how they're striving for happiness.

See:

The first post made me laugh the hardest:

Quote
At $250K my life is a bit better than it was as a law clerk making $50K. I have a nicer apartment with in unit w/d, hardwood floors and lots of sunlight. I have an audi. I eat at fancy restaurants once a week. I buy more expensive clothing, and buy it more frequently. But my life does not feel that much greater.

Does it get way better at $500K?

"Guys, lately I've been buying more and more stuff. But I'm still not happier. What's wrong? Should I buy more stuff?" I pity this person.

EDIT: Nevermind, dude was a troll.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2012, 10:15:12 PM by arebelspy »
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Self-employed-swami

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #36 on: October 12, 2012, 03:33:36 AM »
Well there you have it. 

If one, then all.

Not just one.  One more added to the already considerable count represented by that site :-)  Not all, but most?

I really don't think the mindset is any more prevalent in the young lawyer crowd than any other young professional crowd.  Maybe it is more noticeable because there are a lot of lawyers, and they also sometimes have enough money to do some damage.  In all reality, most of the lawyers I know are pretty down to earth in terms of their spending vs. income.  If anything, having seen lives collapse and being supposed counselors, they are more conservative overall than other groups in terms of spending in my experience.  That said, I live in Indiana, not NYC. 

Doctors, now those are some spendy folks.  Never ever seen a doctor in an even moderately spendy lifestyle... always extravagant.

I'm a young working professional (geologist), and I know LOADS of others I work with that make six-figure incomes, and buy loads of ridiculous things on credit, so it isn't a laywers-only syndrome.  I need a reliable 4x4 truck for my job (I work on the rigs, but please spare me the lecture on how I'm ruining the earth, because I'm here to make sure things are done correctly with as minimal damage to the environment, until we finally solve the energy dilemma) and I drive about 30,000km a year (all paid for by my clients, with a good return to me on my $15,500 vehicle investment).  People bug me about my truck, all the while, driving their newest $80,000 dodge ram 3500's bought on credit.  I bought my truck used 2 years ago (it's a 2006 Toyota Tundra that had 145,000km on it when I bought it; I paid cash).  I'll drive it until the wheels fall off, and they can't be welded back on, while some of the people around me purchase new trucks every second year. 

Anyway, if I'm making my point at all, there are loads of people who make fantastical incomes (some of the people I know make $300,000/year) and spend it all on materialistic crap.  Meanwhile, I try to evaluate each decision based on it's financial return to me.  I get paid $1.15/km (and I spend about $0.22/km combined between gas and insurance, which I have a lot of as a requirement of driving around expensive drilling rigs). Anyway, it's a sweet return on my investment, and that's before I even do any real work.

There are lots of financially-wise lawyers out there as well.  I know a second year whatchamacallit that lives in a one bedroom apartment within walking distance to his job, along with his wife. 

I also remember being a student who felt RICH earning $1,000 a month, which easily paid my rent, food, and phone, and left me plenty of beer money to spare.  I guess that might be the $50,000 versus $250,000 equivalent he was talking about originally.

Meh, now I'm just rambling...

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #37 on: October 12, 2012, 11:47:35 AM »
I bought my truck used 2 years ago (it's a 2006 Toyota Tundra that had 145,000km on it when I bought it; I paid cash).  I'll drive it until the wheels fall off, and they can't be welded back on...

That may be a while.  I'm still driving (and hauling loads of firewood, hay, etc) my '88 Toyota 4x4.

jp

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #38 on: October 12, 2012, 12:25:39 PM »
Just as an off-topic aside... I have a story to tell.  I had an interview last week (I am a gainfully employed lawyer, but always keep options open), and as has become my practice, I just tell the truth "Office Space" style in interviews.  Either they think "damn this guy is actively trying not to get this job"  or the they think "well that's just a straight shooter with upper management written all over him." 

So when asked about where I see my career in 10 years, I responded "uh, not working.  I won't be working anymore in 10 years."  Both the 49 year old boss man (I know because he told me) and the late 50's / early 60's COO (I am guessing here), were highly amused by this.  They laughed, prodded, and asked how exactly do I plan on doing that... well, you better share your secrets, etc.  During the rest of the chit-chat, I mentally judged him as he told me about his "servants" (yes, he actually said the word servants) and nannies (multiple, apparently), wild year long vacations to exotic lands for his family wherein he actually flew out every single weekend to visit them, etc.  I noticed 4 matching Mercedes' in the parking lot which I assume were firm cars (probably leases).  I left with a very strong and palpable feeling that I never want to be like that guy (although, he was a hella nice guy)... he honestly was completely unable to connect the dots between spending and FI.  Though, I think for him, he would work no matter what, and really didn't see FI as a means to do more living and less earning (pretty sure earning was the fun for him).   

For what it is worth, when asked how I planned to do it I only responded "require less".  He did enthusiastically offer me the job, which I declined.  But even being there in the very fancy office made me realize how my dented minivan would stand out in the parking lot, and made me see how a lawyer could feel certain pressure to conform in that setting (though I personally didn't feel it).

BUt it was all a very interesting experience and really got to put my independent thinking and autonomy genes to the test.   

Self-employed-swami

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #39 on: October 12, 2012, 01:16:24 PM »
I bought my truck used 2 years ago (it's a 2006 Toyota Tundra that had 145,000km on it when I bought it; I paid cash).  I'll drive it until the wheels fall off, and they can't be welded back on...

That may be a while.  I'm still driving (and hauling loads of firewood, hay, etc) my '88 Toyota 4x4.

I am a diehard Toyota fan.  My When my husband and I were in university (6 years ago), my Mom gave us her old car (1987 Camry station wagon).  It had ~430,000 km on it.  We drove it for 2 years, until it started to randomly accelerate on it's own, and my Dad couldn't fix it. He sold it to someone who could for $300, and found someone selling a 1986 Tercel station wagon ($600).  That was the most badass car ever, and we drove it until it blew a rod in the engine the following year.

I have 208,000km on my truck right now, and she's just getting broken in!

CNM

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #40 on: October 12, 2012, 03:34:20 PM »
I'm a lawyer and, like said up thread, this attitude is not the norm in my profession and especially not at my small firm.  However, it seems to me that this attitude of acquisition may be particularly bad with lawyers because (1) many lawyers hate their jobs so they practice shopping therapy; (2) socially, people expect lawyers to earn and, in turn, spend a lot; and (3) lifestyle creep/keeping up appearances with your lawyer peers.  I can't imagine that it's really any different than any other high earning profession.
« Last Edit: October 12, 2012, 03:36:39 PM by CNM »

Paul der Krake

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #41 on: October 12, 2012, 08:25:05 PM »
Plea to the lawyers of this thread: commentary on the series 'Suits' on USA? I have started watching it recently and would love someone in BigLaw to criticise/acclaim it.

Thanks!

kkbmustang

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #42 on: October 12, 2012, 08:57:59 PM »
Never heard of it. When is it on?

Adventine

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #43 on: October 12, 2012, 09:17:10 PM »
Plea to the lawyers of this thread: commentary on the series 'Suits' on USA? I have started watching it recently and would love someone in BigLaw to criticise/acclaim it.

Thanks!

Yeah, actual lawyers - how many Harvey Spencers do you know in real life?

Paul der Krake

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #44 on: October 12, 2012, 09:39:34 PM »
@kkbmustang: they are taking a break right now but the show returns in January. Season 1 is already out on DVD and there are a couple episodes online ( http://www.usanetwork.com/videos/Suits/Full%20Episodes ).

In a nutshell, it's about this gifted college dropout who fakes his way through a top-tier NYC firm and how he struggles to learn the ropes of a high pressure environment at a firm that only employs Harvard Law graduates. There other main characters are two competing uber-alpha-male (both very unmustachian), their black female boss (!), and a sexy paralegal who resents her inability to take standardized tests and go to law school.

Damn this sounds weird. Anyway, I find it very enjoyable to watch as an outsider, but then my knowledge of the law is abysmal.

Jack

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #45 on: October 13, 2012, 08:27:41 AM »
Damn this sounds weird. Anyway, I find it very enjoyable to watch as an outsider, but then my knowledge of the law is abysmal.

I think USA puts mind control waves in their shows 'cause IMO they're all good. Not good enough to keep me from cancelling DirecTV recently, mind you, but good enough to wait for the season to end first.

kkbmustang

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #46 on: October 13, 2012, 01:11:38 PM »
So, I watched half of an episode. Entertaining, yes. Realistically reflecting day to day law firm life? No.

TomTX

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Re: The Delusion of Young Lawyers
« Reply #47 on: October 14, 2012, 07:20:47 AM »
Well there you have it. 

If one, then all.

Not just one.  One more added to the already considerable count represented by that site :-)  Not all, but most?

I really don't think the mindset is any more prevalent in the young lawyer crowd than any other young professional crowd.  Maybe it is more noticeable because there are a lot of lawyers, and they also sometimes have enough money to do some damage.  In all reality, most of the lawyers I know are pretty down to earth in terms of their spending vs. income.  If anything, having seen lives collapse and being supposed counselors, they are more conservative overall than other groups in terms of spending in my experience.  That said, I live in Indiana, not NYC. 

Doctors, now those are some spendy folks.  Never ever seen a doctor in an even moderately spendy lifestyle... always extravagant.

When my brother graduated college with a finance degree and went to work for Arthur Anderson - that's how he lived. Earn more/spend more. Worked for him until AA imploded. He still hasn't learned. He bounces from 6-figure job (and the first digit isn't a 1) to no job, and keeps up the lifestyle.  Has tons of debt.