Author Topic: The BMW College Graduate Special  (Read 3269 times)

jprince7827

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The BMW College Graduate Special
« on: December 04, 2014, 11:30:26 AM »
So, this happened:

http://www.bmwusa.com/Standard/Content/SalesandPrograms/CollegeGraduateProgram.aspx

Like the Tobacco Companies - get 'em young.

gimp

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Re: The BMW College Graduate Special
« Reply #1 on: December 04, 2014, 11:48:39 AM »
As is pretty much always the case with posted discounts for cars, you'll still get a better deal by going into a random dealership with the invoice amount and offering $500 over that. Much better than a thousand off MSRP.

jprince7827

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SporeSpawn

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Re: The BMW College Graduate Special
« Reply #3 on: December 04, 2014, 01:53:03 PM »
I'm not sure I understand BMW's slogan on that page.

"Graduate to a car that puts you in the driver's seat."

Is it suggesting I've been letting someone else drive this whole time? Maybe. I mean, these are college grads, so BMW might be saying, "Hey, you're on your own now kiddo. Time to ditch Mom's SUV and get behind the wheel." But that's a bit of a presumption, right? I mean, most people attending college are over 16, so wouldn't the vast majority of those willing to get a car already have one? Or suggesting the concept of "ownership." After all, won't a lot of grads still be driving the hand-me-down sedan Dad traded up from, or the reliable Junker bought with the cash from the penny jar just to get them out of high school? Most won't really feel like that is "their" car, so maybe they're suggesting that by being the one who signs up for this car, I'm really "in the driver's seat" now. No more familial obligations. Just me and the road! Also, how is the BMW itself going to put me in the driver's seat? Physically. Yikes! That's scary.

And... "graduate?" As in "complete a course of training?" Jesus, you mean I need to do a TEST to get this car? How pretentious. I'm paying you. Give me the car. Or, wait, maybe they're using "graduate" to convey the sense of "changing gradually along a scale" with the suggestion being along an upwards path. If this is so, that's presume a bit. What makes the BMW a graduation from my current vehicle/means of travel? You're assuming a lot BMW! You should be selling me on this BMW, not insulting my choice of motorized locomotion.

Ok ok, joking aside, as has been said, it's classic, standard incentive. There's an incentive for every occasion, if it'll get you to sign. I guarantee you I could find a company or dealer willing to knock $1,000 off MSRP if I told them it was my birthday... provided I agree to sign that 10 year lease to celebrate.

mydogismyheart

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Re: The BMW College Graduate Special
« Reply #4 on: December 04, 2014, 01:56:07 PM »
I used this to my advantage once (back when I was younger and in the habit of buying new cars).  I went with my dad who is a hardcore negotiator to a Jeep Dealership (they offer the same deal).  We negotiated and negotiated until we were unable to get them to budge anymore.  Then, just before we signed the paperwork, we pulled out the $1,000 for recent grad advertisement and I showed them my new shiny degree.  They were forced to give it to me.

Not sure if buying a new car as a recent grad was a good thing or not, BUT at least I tried to get them back!

gimp

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Re: The BMW College Graduate Special
« Reply #5 on: December 04, 2014, 03:57:57 PM »
mydogismyheart: Really! That's fascinating. They must get reimbursed by the company, then? Otherwise no way in hell that they'd agree. (Unless of course they were still making profit. Which is a weird thing for dealers - they can sell cars at cost or even below cost and still make money due to incentives by the manufacturer.)

Chranstronaut

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Re: The BMW College Graduate Special
« Reply #6 on: December 04, 2014, 04:09:52 PM »
...Which is a weird thing for dealers - they can sell cars at cost or even below cost and still make money due to incentives by the manufacturer.)

Yup, super weird.  It's in your favor to negotiate at the end of the month as they will go lower if they still need to fill their quota to the manufacturer.

gimp

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Re: The BMW College Graduate Special
« Reply #7 on: December 04, 2014, 04:21:53 PM »
Yup. And at the end of the quarter, especially if they have to pay taxes on any cars currently sitting in their lot. Especially if that coincides with the end of the year... say, Dec 27th... when they've all got quotas to meet or sales numbers to fill or competitions to win... Especially if the car isn't flashy, or extremely in demand... Especially if you're willing to take the previous year model (eg 2014 model at the end of 2014, instead of the new 2015 models already released)... Especially if you're willing to take the show model that's been up on the ramps, or one that's been test-driven for a few hundred miles... I've seen brand new cars sold for $5k under $20k invoice in those conditions, when everyone was desperate to get it the fuck out of the lot. Though that's a bit of an exception. But absolutely, you can get them to agree to five hundred or even a thousand under invoice if they're a bit desperate for numbers or turnover. Not that I advocate buying a new car, but $5k off invoice for a relatively inexpensive new car isn't terrible.

Used cars bought at auction or wholesale are a different game entirely. Researching price paid is much more difficult, and they don't get dealer incentives to move cars, though they still occasionally will let a used car go at a loss under some of the aforementioned conditions. If you can get a used car for under what a dealer paid for it at auction, and there's nothing fucked with the car itself, that's usually a pretty damn good deal, often cheaper than craigslist or ebay by a significant margin, since dealerships are pretty good at not losing money. Too bad many used car dealerships are entirely, or at least partially employ scumbags, both salesmen and mechanics.