Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 8866588 times)

jprince7827

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3150 on: July 08, 2014, 06:44:57 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

peppermint

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3151 on: July 08, 2014, 06:56:42 AM »
Google maps has definitely made it much easier to sort out how to take a bus where you want to go. Once I'm at the bus stop, I also use a smartphone app called Rider that tells me when different bus lines are scheduled to arrive, taking the guess work out of waiting (caveat: Rider doesn't work everywhere). Also, if you are new to the bus route, telling the driver the intersection you want to get off at usually means he/she will stop and call it out for you so you don't miss it.

Mississippi Mudstache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3152 on: July 08, 2014, 07:52:45 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.

randymarsh

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3153 on: July 08, 2014, 08:03:37 AM »
I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Grew up/currently live in a mostly rural area. We have a couple of housing developments, but a lot of corn fields overall. Here, public transportation = poor. Me and most of of friends got cars at 16 or 17 and have been driving everywhere ever since. It's not just a "public transportation is gross/scary/etc" thing though. I'd have to drive 10 miles to get to the closet bus stop anyway.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3154 on: July 08, 2014, 08:06:56 AM »

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.

Cool story. Fits pretty well with the latest MMM post if you didn't read it already. Hopefully you are a stronger person for it. Badass indeed.
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2014/07/07/necessity-is-the-mother-of-badassity/

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3155 on: July 08, 2014, 08:23:35 AM »

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.

Cool story. Fits pretty well with the latest MMM post if you didn't read it already. Hopefully you are a stronger person for it. Badass indeed.
http://www.mrmoneymustache.com/2014/07/07/necessity-is-the-mother-of-badassity/

And the reactions you get when everyone thinks you are on drugs are usually pretty fun.

Ashyukun

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3156 on: July 08, 2014, 08:30:44 AM »

Being an office full of engineers, a higher percentage of people than most it seems bring in their meals- though I see way too many BigBucks coffee cups being carried around since we're really close to one. What amazes me is that people bring food in to the office, put it in one of the two full-size refrigerators (or into the smaller ones people have brought in)- and then apparently completely forget that it's there. Every other month, the secretary has to send out several dire threatening emails about cleaning out the fridge and ends up throwing away nearly 2 full fridges worth of food that people have just left in there- and not just take-out containers, I'm talking tupperware containers, full packs of hot dogs/brats, all kinds of dressings and sauces. All just thrown away because they were either forgotten about or the person who brought them in ignored the emails about the fridge cleanout.

It also amazes me that despite having done it for the last 9 years I've worked here that people are still amazed that I bring in the ingredients for and cook my breakfasts (essentially an omelet) in the break room every morning.

Do you have a full kitchen at work?  We only have a microwave.  I would also be amazed at someone cooking eggs in a microwave when they have a stove at home, which is a better method for cooking eggs (in my opinion).

My parents have a doohickey that you crack eggs into, then shove in the microwave. Makes perfect poached eggs, once you figure out the timing.  Though I'd rather have a plate of properly cooked scrambled eggs any day of the week.
I do love a good poached egg, but I've never seen the microwavable 'doohickey' before. 

I'm a fan of over medium or scrambled eggs.  Neither option is microwave friendly. 

Most people bring lunch where I work, but the car situation is insane.  There have been a few people that make about $60k/year purchasing luxury automobiles new this summer (BMW/Lexus).  The senior staff that make $200-250k have a wide range of cars, but nothing new (old Mercedes, Subarus, etc.).

Nope, just two microwaves. The stove obviously works better, but I don't like eating before I ride in to work on my bike so that's not really an option. I worked out long ago the time and method for cooking the eggs. 2 eggs go into my tupperware bowl, scramble them with a fork until mixed, stir in diced ham (most days, occasionally use other meat if we have leftovers that will work), veggies, and cheese, and then toss in the microwave for about 2 minutes.


seanc0x0

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3157 on: July 08, 2014, 08:47:03 AM »

My parents have a doohickey that you crack eggs into, then shove in the microwave. Makes perfect poached eggs, once you figure out the timing.  Though I'd rather have a plate of properly cooked scrambled eggs any day of the week.
I do love a good poached egg, but I've never seen the microwavable 'doohickey' before. 

I'm a fan of over medium or scrambled eggs.  Neither option is microwave friendly. 

Most people bring lunch where I work, but the car situation is insane.  There have been a few people that make about $60k/year purchasing luxury automobiles new this summer (BMW/Lexus).  The senior staff that make $200-250k have a wide range of cars, but nothing new (old Mercedes, Subarus, etc.).

This is the thing they have: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2yZOJW8ph8U  It took some time to get the exact time sorted out so the yolk was right where I like it (just barely runny), but now that it's dialed in it's just a matter of putting it in the microwave for 56 seconds. We don't pierce the yolk like they do in the video though.

As far as cars at work, I work at a large university and we have everything from '90s Toyotas to the prof who parks his Porsche 911 behind the building where I work. Mostly, though, the cars are not too old, but not too new. There's not a lot of showoffs around my area (I'm in IT, but my office is in the Physics building), though if you head over to the admin or law buildings, that changes quickly!

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3158 on: July 08, 2014, 09:45:14 AM »
Also, who says hella in manhattan?

Also, who says hella outside of 1997?

Everyone I know in California.

Hella Californians.  I still gotta give them mad props for their wicked cool weather.

Gin1984

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3159 on: July 08, 2014, 10:52:00 AM »
I know this topic has been mentioned before, but I am still amazed at all my coworkers who buy Starbucks coffees, breakfast, and lunch at work every day. We have a machine the department pays for that makes all kinds of coffee, tea, cappucinos, lattes, and hot cocoa. We have a break room with 2 full sized refrigerators with freezers, a microwave, toaster oven, regular toaster, full size kitchen sink and dishwasher. My napkin calculation is they spend about 8-10% of their gross paycheck on mediocre food and coffee to enjoy at their cubicles and receptionist desks.
Several of my coworkers pay for a gym membership even though we have a spa-like on site gym that never closes. It is free to all employees and their spouses.
And, my favorite antimustachian coworker, who didn't sign up for the company-subsidized remote parking lot with shuttle bus service to the building door because "I would NEVER ride that shuttle (shudders)". Instead, this coworker parks in our building's overpriced parking garage for $10/day out of pocket, and pays $20 or more to park twice if she has an off-site meeting (that she could take the shuttle bus to). I think it costs about $60/month out of pocket to use the remote parking lot, but not sure since I use the completely free to me, company-paid bus pass.

I have recently found out that people (probably those who lived in rura or suburban areas and got cars as teenagers?) have an unreasonable fear of public buses. I do not comprehend this. If public transit takes you where you need to go, it's fantastic!

Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

You just conjured up some flashbacks from 2006. I spent the summer in Brazil, six weeks of which I was in Rio de Janeiro. I had only a tepid command of the Portuguese language, and my understanding of the bus system was even worse. I left some friends' apartment around midnight and was trying to get back to the family that I was staying with on the other side of town. I got on what I thought was my bus, and a several minutes into the ride, I noticed that the bus was getting emptier and and emptier, and no closer to my side of town. I had no idea where I was or what to do. Finally, when I was the last person left on the bus, the driver asked me where I was going. So I told him. He told me that I was on the wrong bus, and that he didn't think I wanted to go where he was going (I already didn't want to go where he had gone). So he let me out in the middle of a favela and pointed in the direction that I needed to go. I began walking, a scared shitless skinny white boy alone in the slums of Brazil at 1 AM. I just kept my chin up and kept walking past hordes of prostitutes and homeless sidewalk communities. It seemed like forever, but finally a cab passed, so I waved him down. Mercifully, he stopped and I climbed aboard. He asked where I was going and I gave him the address. Then he asked why out was out in the middle of the favela by myself in the middle of the night. I told him about getting on the wrong bus and getting lost. So he laughs and says that the reason nobody messed with me was because they probably thought I was on drugs. And that he almost didn't stop for me because he thought the same thing. Yeah, I don't like buses myself, but then again, I have lived a mostly rural life.
Sorry MM, this probably was very scary but I am giggling like mad over here.  :D

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3160 on: July 08, 2014, 11:05:40 AM »
No worries, Gin. It was scary at the time, but after I made it through unscathed, it simply became a good story to laugh about in retrospect. As Cheddar Stacker noted, it made me slightly more badass than I was before because I didn't view getting lost in say, Atlanta, with nearly as much trepidation as I would have before the incident. There are some bad parts in Atlanta, but nothing like what I saw in Rio that night :)

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3161 on: July 08, 2014, 11:36:08 AM »
Not at work, but I was having lunch with a former coworker so it's close.  I was telling him about MMM, my goal to FIRE, not carrying debt, saving massive amounts of money, etc.  At one point I mentioned that I use credit cards for almost all purchases for the rewards, but I never carry a balance.  In fact, I have no debt other than my mortgage.

Him: I'm the same way.  I don't have any debt.
Me: (a little surprised) Really?  That's awesome.
Him: Well, except my student loans. 
Me: Oh.
Him: And of course my car.
Me: ....

Daisy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3162 on: July 08, 2014, 11:48:43 AM »
No worries, Gin. It was scary at the time, but after I made it through unscathed, it simply became a good story to laugh about in retrospect. As Cheddar Stacker noted, it made me slightly more badass than I was before because I didn't view getting lost in say, Atlanta, with nearly as much trepidation as I would have before the incident. There are some bad parts in Atlanta, but nothing like what I saw in Rio that night :)

Some of my best travel stories involve public transportation mishaps.

Like the time I was in a small town in Italy. We decided to take an early morning hike into the mountains on the day we were leaving. After the hike, we got on the bus to take us back to our hotel where our packed bags were. It was a beautifully crafted plan where the bus would take us to the hotel, we'd go back into the center of town to take a ferry to the neighboring town with a train station, where we would then get to Rome and take a fast train to Venice. Didn't happen quite that way...

Apparently the bus routes in this town don't go in circles as the bus dropped us off in the middle of town and we had to get off. We had to run through town about 5 miles (I may be exaggerating) back to the hotel. On the run back, we saw our hotel manager in town and told him we had to check out. So he also went back to the hotel to help us. Before he got there, we got to our villa, had to McGyver our way into the room to get our luggage, he finally came to help, we ran back into town (5 miles?Probably more like 2...) again with our luggage, but we missed the ferry. So we had to run back out back to where our hotel was to catch the out of town bus to take us to the other town with the train station. Did I mention this town was on a cliff? We missed that train. We ended up taking an overnight slow train from Rome to Venice, in which we were awoken at about midnight that our train was going to split in two at the next stop and the part of the train we were on wasn't going to Venice. So we had to move all of our stuff again. Also, a friend lost their passport during all of this turmoil.

We did end up in Venice early the next morning - totally exhausted. But it's one of my favorite stories. My nieces tell me I have the craziest stories...
« Last Edit: July 08, 2014, 11:53:14 AM by Daisy »

galliver

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3163 on: July 08, 2014, 12:10:15 PM »
Galliver, I actually did have such a fear. I grew up on an estate(it had a name) out in the country where it took half an hour to get anywhere. I'd never even ridden a public bus until I first got to UVa. Once there, I was too afraid to ride them because every time I tried one, I'd end up in a part of campus I didn't recognize because I couldn't figure out the routes. Eventually I just took to walking because I enjoyed it more, and I knew I wouldn't get lost.

I was finally forced to confront my bus-fear when I came to Chicago. I had no choice. The first few experiments were rough, shall we say, but thanks to Google I was able to map out my routes in advance and eventually I learned how it all works. That fear is real though - it's the fear of getting onto a dirty moving object and not having the ability to get off until it's taken you to a very bad place. In Chicago, this can happen really easily.

That is a reasonable fear. But you can combat it by educating yourself about the transit system--what the routes are, when they are active, etc. Then by keeping track once you get on the bus and making sure you know where it is and where it's going (it's easier than ever with a smartphone but you can also do it with a map). Finally, by having cab fare in your pocket and a charged cell phone (previously: change for a pay phone). I think what I was really getting at is that people are afraid of using the system because they have never been introduced to it, and that's a shame/I don't understand never encountering this in your life.

Grew up/currently live in a mostly rural area. We have a couple of housing developments, but a lot of corn fields overall. Here, public transportation = poor. Me and most of of friends got cars at 16 or 17 and have been driving everywhere ever since. It's not just a "public transportation is gross/scary/etc" thing though. I'd have to drive 10 miles to get to the closet bus stop anyway.

...and that's different. If it's not available is not the same thing as if it's there and you think it's gross/scary/etc so you don't use it, even though it's $72/year and takes you everywhere (<-- my town) and has super-nice drivers and is generally very clean. Also you should visit a city and ride some buses, for the experience. :)

Travis

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3164 on: July 08, 2014, 12:24:06 PM »
Also, who says hella in manhattan?

Also, who says hella outside of 1997?

Everyone I know in California.

Hella Californians.  I still gotta give them mad props for their wicked cool weather.

I only hear that from New Englanders.

fartface

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3165 on: July 08, 2014, 03:45:05 PM »
Ok, I can't STAND it anymore...so I'm glad this forum exists. I have a co-worker who, personally, I enjoy very much. We are about the same age, have the same number of kids, drive the same 2005 mini-van, do the same job, and generally have a lot in common....EXCEPT...her extreme debt - which SHE constantly brings up ,and it drives me NUTS. I want to face punch her so many times it's not even funny.

Last week after a two-day convention downtown, this CW – Melissa - and I stopped at a nearby bar afterwards for a drink. She showed me her professionally painted nails, new salon haircut and highlights, her latest (deeply discounted to $200) boots, etc. She looked great – and I “oohed and aahed” over everything for her benefit. She whipped out her Iphone 5s and texted her 12 and 14 year old kids on their Iphones and then ordered a $7 drink. I found out my beer was $4 and said we should go somewhere else. She said, “We’re only staying for two – would be a pain to walk next door to another bar just to save a dollar.” For the record, the bar next door (see drankbank.com) was offering $2.50 happy hour pints! Sigh, I went along with it because I’m an accommodating friend, and unlike Melissa, I rarely go out - - even for happy hour specials. It had been months since I actually bought myself two beers a bar.

Going on 20 years of frugal-assity, I can afford the $10 tab (w/tip). I was wearing comfortable walking shoes because I rode the bus into the city for the convention from my suburban park-and-ride both days. My clothes – likely no match for Melissa’s - are comfortable, professional, and clean though definitely not designer or new.

By the time our second round of drinks had arrived, I’d known more about Melissa’s ongoing troubles with finances than I cared to. I cringed inwardly to find out, she’s got tens of thousands in credit card debt. “My husband needs a second job” she said. I listened patiently for a while but eventually said, “Maybe you shouldn’t spend so much money?” followed by silence. “Nope, I really don’t spend that much, my husband just needs to earn more…”

I have no words. I’ve worked with Melissa three years now. As our friendship has grown, so has my knowledge of her finances. And by the way, I never bring up the subject of money; she’s always the first to mention her dire financial straits to me...

I try to help - not lecture - but when I do attempt suggestions…she ends up debating and defending her spending to me.   

We once compared our monthly expenses (bored at work I guess). I busted out my monthly budget on a spreadsheet. Some examples:

Me: Utilities (gas and electric): $150. She spends double. By the way we both own four bedroom homes, similar square footage. Mine will be paid for in 2 years, she just re-financed for another 30 years....

Me: Cable and Internet $100/month (yeah - that might deserve a backhand)
Her: $200+/month (Face Punch for sure). Her punk 14 year old son who tells her she's a bitch just HAS to have HBO and the Sunday football package. Which reminds me, she "surprised" her husband and son w/50 yard line football tickets last winter after crying about not being able to qualify for a HELOC because she doesn't have enough equity in the home she's owned for 15 years. Ug.

She struts into meetings w/freshly manicured fingernails, clutching a Starbucks most mornings. Then cries at lunch about her debt. She once asked me for a $20 loan on a Thursday (next day was payday) because she had to get to the bank that afternoon to avoid being overdrawn til payday. WTF.

Clothing. Don't get me started. She nearly gagged when I told her I got my bathing suit this year from Goodwill. It still had tags on it (from Target) and I got it for less than $5. She was repulsed. Then promptly gushed about three new pairs of skorts for her upcoming family Disney World trip (so she could get in and out of the roller coasters of course). I asked how much for each pair. "ONly $30 plus tax - EACH!" OK, so $100 for three pair of shorts for a vacation you certainly can't afford? Maddening.

Now all summer long she's been posting "Brunch w/the hubby" and later that day "Dinner w/Awesome friends at such and such a place" all over facebook. Are you kidding me? Sometimes I see photos of her flaming Hawaiin foo-foo drinks (likely $12 each) when she ventures out to these restaurants she absolutely cannot afford. And today she had a fun post on facebook asking all of us if we could recommend any good contractors...she wants a new patio poured...aaaaaggghhh.

Forgot one more: went back and trolled her FB page.

CW: Enjoying summer and Usher! 
Commenter: Where are you sitting?
CW: Lawn (sad face). Spent too much on Section 2 at Lady Gaga last week. Had to be economical.

EXACT WORDS - Couldn't make this shit up if I tried!!!
 

 
 
« Last Edit: July 08, 2014, 04:10:46 PM by fartface »

shotgunwilly

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3166 on: July 08, 2014, 04:01:47 PM »
Ok, I can't STAND it anymore...so I'm glad this forum exists. I have a co-worker who, personally, I enjoy very much. We are about the same age, have the same number of kids, drive the same 2005 mini-van, do the same job, and generally have a lot in common....EXCEPT...her extreme debt - which SHE constantly brings up ,and it drives me NUTS. I want to face punch her so many times it's not even funny.................

This type of person is up there at the top of my list of my least favorite people in the world.  I would do everything I could to get someone like this out of my life.

Daisy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3167 on: July 08, 2014, 04:22:27 PM »
Going on 20 years of frugal-assity, I can afford the $10 tab (w/tip). I was wearing comfortable walking shoes because I rode the bus into the city for the convention from my suburban park-and-ride both days. My clothes – likely no match for Melissa’s - are comfortable, professional, and clean though definitely not designer or new.

Oh yeah...I know one, or two, or maybe ten people like that at work and friends. They are mega-spending and then parallely (may have made that word up) complaining about their debt and costs. There are too many stories to recount...

What caught my attention about your post was the comfortable walking shoes. I've had two women in my office refuse to walk to lunch across the street because they were wearing very pricey uncomfortable shoes. One decided to drive instead to a lunch. Another refused to go once and ate at the local (bad) cafeteria instead of joining us. One recently decided to bring in some comfortable mocassins for these invitations to walk since she knows I refuse to get in a car to drive across the street for lunch. She wears the uncomfortable shoes while at work. She tried to convince her other friend to do the same. I guess it's progress....

The Hamster

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3168 on: July 08, 2014, 08:46:53 PM »
Ok, I can't STAND it anymore...so I'm glad this forum exists.
....
EXACT WORDS - Couldn't make this shit up if I tried!!!

OMG!!!  I would be seriously telling her next time she whinges about her debt to STFU about it unless she is specifically asking you for your help on how to start controlling her spending.  In a nice way of course.  Or maybe you could leave some financial counsellor's business cards on her desk as a hint.

I have a lovely friend who isn't nearly as bad as that, but still spends way too much money on what I consider to be a total waste such as concerts, live music, nights out drinking etc etc but at least she doesn't whinge about her debt to me.

Kactus

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3169 on: July 08, 2014, 09:09:10 PM »
Quote
Bus discussions

Do people really just jump on buses at random and then wonder why they don't get to their destination? Because that's what I'm getting from the above discussion O_o

I live in a sprawling city that is more than 40km from edge to edge, buses go in all directions (both linear and ring routes), subtle differences in bus numbers can have the bus go right past where you want to go, or leave you with a 20 min walk at the end, though they generally won't take you to completely the wrong end of town without being a completely different number. Most bus stops have a sign saying where the buses go, larger bus stops will even have a brief map. Even before I had access to the internet there was the bus timetable phone number, or paper timetables. Also bus drivers are often happy to have you stop them and ask where their bus is going (and as someone mentioned earlier, point out your stop for you). I've also had a few bus drivers willing to go the extra mile by letting me on the bus for free when the bus in front of them declined to stop to pick me up, or when I had no money as a regular bus patron and they knew I'd pay them back tomorrow.

I can understand the fear of not knowing where to get off the bus if you are going to an unfamiliar area or if the bus stops on a street you don't recognise. I used to study a map in those instances and memorise or note down the sidestreet before the stop I wanted, and the walk from the bus to my destination. And I knew how to place a collect call if I didn't have 50c on me for a payphone and needed my mum to rescue me. And I can understand not wanting to take public transport if you easily fall asleep and go waay past your stop. But a fear of getting on the wrong bus? Do you regularly make (non-trivial) decisions in your life with no prior information?

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3170 on: July 08, 2014, 10:31:45 PM »
Quote
Bus discussions

Do people really just jump on buses at random and then wonder why they don't get to their destination? Because that's what I'm getting from the above discussion O_o

I live in a sprawling city that is more than 40km from edge to edge, buses go in all directions (both linear and ring routes), subtle differences in bus numbers can have the bus go right past where you want to go, or leave you with a 20 min walk at the end, though they generally won't take you to completely the wrong end of town without being a completely different number. Most bus stops have a sign saying where the buses go, larger bus stops will even have a brief map. Even before I had access to the internet there was the bus timetable phone number, or paper timetables. Also bus drivers are often happy to have you stop them and ask where their bus is going (and as someone mentioned earlier, point out your stop for you). I've also had a few bus drivers willing to go the extra mile by letting me on the bus for free when the bus in front of them declined to stop to pick me up, or when I had no money as a regular bus patron and they knew I'd pay them back tomorrow.

I can understand the fear of not knowing where to get off the bus if you are going to an unfamiliar area or if the bus stops on a street you don't recognise. I used to study a map in those instances and memorise or note down the sidestreet before the stop I wanted, and the walk from the bus to my destination. And I knew how to place a collect call if I didn't have 50c on me for a payphone and needed my mum to rescue me. And I can understand not wanting to take public transport if you easily fall asleep and go waay past your stop. But a fear of getting on the wrong bus? Do you regularly make (non-trivial) decisions in your life with no prior information?

Eh I grew up in very low density suburbs, and I wasn't ascared of the bus until I actually rode the busses in the big city.  I had previously had fine experiences.  I still ride them, but I have to be wary.  Even recently, I followed online transit directions and ended up with the operator stopping in a pretty bad neighborhood and just leaving the bus in the middle of the road.  Luckily the one other person ok the bus was a regular who knew that there was some ongoing service diversion which required transfering to a different shuttle, which was absolutely the most run down bus I've ever seen in the US.  I did make it out alive , but it took far longer than I had planned.

nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3171 on: July 08, 2014, 10:51:12 PM »
Quote
Bus discussions

Do people really just jump on buses at random and then wonder why they don't get to their destination? Because that's what I'm getting from the above discussion O_o

I live in a sprawling city that is more than 40km from edge to edge, buses go in all directions (both linear and ring routes), subtle differences in bus numbers can have the bus go right past where you want to go, or leave you with a 20 min walk at the end, though they generally won't take you to completely the wrong end of town without being a completely different number. Most bus stops have a sign saying where the buses go, larger bus stops will even have a brief map. Even before I had access to the internet there was the bus timetable phone number, or paper timetables. Also bus drivers are often happy to have you stop them and ask where their bus is going (and as someone mentioned earlier, point out your stop for you). I've also had a few bus drivers willing to go the extra mile by letting me on the bus for free when the bus in front of them declined to stop to pick me up, or when I had no money as a regular bus patron and they knew I'd pay them back tomorrow.

I can understand the fear of not knowing where to get off the bus if you are going to an unfamiliar area or if the bus stops on a street you don't recognise. I used to study a map in those instances and memorise or note down the sidestreet before the stop I wanted, and the walk from the bus to my destination. And I knew how to place a collect call if I didn't have 50c on me for a payphone and needed my mum to rescue me. And I can understand not wanting to take public transport if you easily fall asleep and go waay past your stop. But a fear of getting on the wrong bus? Do you regularly make (non-trivial) decisions in your life with no prior information?

I live in Korea, and I definitely have the bus-fear. I double-, triple-, quadruple-, a zajillionuple-check that I know the right bus number and always have the stop name written in Korean when I make any trip. It's a little ridiculous how crippled I feel, but I absolutely do not have the hang of it yet. Actually, I've *still* gotten off at the wrong stop a couple times despite my preparation because 1) my English-ears didn't understand the announcer said "Next stop is ____", so I had to walk a bit to get to my stop and 2) I didn't realize that the stop name had varying numbers corresponding to different bus stops MILES apart (took a taxi for that fuck-up).

I have to take a bus to a concert tomorrow night, and I'm already stressing about it! Time to hit the maps and study the street views until I feel comfortable...

I think the solution would be to take the bus more frequently, but I don't because I'm such a baby and can walk most places I need to go to. Might be nice to explore my city a bit more, though.

johnintaiwan

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3172 on: July 09, 2014, 06:51:21 AM »

What caught my attention about your post was the comfortable walking shoes. I've had two women in my office refuse to walk to lunch across the street because they were wearing very pricey uncomfortable shoes. One decided to drive instead to a lunch. Another refused to go once and ate at the local (bad) cafeteria instead of joining us. One recently decided to bring in some comfortable mocassins for these invitations to walk since she knows I refuse to get in a car to drive across the street for lunch. She wears the uncomfortable shoes while at work. She tried to convince her other friend to do the same. I guess it's progress....

I have never understood why anyone would ever buy uncomfortable shoes on purpose. I also have no sympathy for people who wear them. When i was single, many a date ended when I refused to listen to someone whine about their shoes. I would say that I didn't pick the shoes and as an adult you should have known better. I guess that is not very chivalrous, but it is probably my biggest pet peeve. 

eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3173 on: July 09, 2014, 07:57:31 AM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

Still too hot to drink, in the summer.  In the winter it cools off more so I ask the barista to make it extra hot and it balances out just fine.  I've never noticed mine being cold or heard anyone else mention it, at least.

Just an FYI, there's no way to make it extra hot. Source: high school Dunkin Donuts employee. Best job I've ever had fun-wise.

eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3174 on: July 09, 2014, 07:59:14 AM »
While discussing healthy diet and getting out of debt, someone told me that he spends $1000 a month on food and detailed all the restaurants he visited in the last month. When cooking at home he likes to fry beef and cheese in bacon grease and put it on bread with bacon. He also gave "ribs and pork chops" as an example of a healthy meal he would eat at home.

I think for $1000 a month you could have a pretty good drug habit going.

Ribs and pork chops aren't healthy? Ribs have some fat on them but I get pretty full quickly... and of course the chops are great too. Now the beef and cheese in bacon grease and bread... not so much.

eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3175 on: July 09, 2014, 08:12:08 AM »
I live in Korea, and I definitely have the bus-fear. I double-, triple-, quadruple-, a zajillionuple-check that I know the right bus number and always have the stop name written in Korean when I make any trip. It's a little ridiculous how crippled I feel, but I absolutely do not have the hang of it yet. Actually, I've *still* gotten off at the wrong stop a couple times despite my preparation because 1) my English-ears didn't understand the announcer said "Next stop is ____", so I had to walk a bit to get to my stop and 2) I didn't realize that the stop name had varying numbers corresponding to different bus stops MILES apart (took a taxi for that fuck-up).

I have to take a bus to a concert tomorrow night, and I'm already stressing about it! Time to hit the maps and study the street views until I feel comfortable...

I think the solution would be to take the bus more frequently, but I don't because I'm such a baby and can walk most places I need to go to. Might be nice to explore my city a bit more, though.

Exact same feeling when I started riding the bus in Philly. After a while, it became a lot more comfortable. I would take it about 2 times a week when my wife and I would carpool into the city but she was done much earlier. Definitely gets easier! I'm always impressed about the people who show up EVERY TIME right as the bus pulls up. I always got there 10 minutes before since I didn't want to miss it.

AlanStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3176 on: July 09, 2014, 08:53:08 AM »
Buses in the US are no problem at all, just try and navigate Tokyo trains!  I got lost in a minor station, never mind being sure of getting on the right train.  At least in the city the important signs are also in English.  There is no one Tokyo train map, city is to big, with to many trains, owned by to many different private companies. 

Ashyukun

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3177 on: July 09, 2014, 08:57:34 AM »
Buses in the US are no problem at all, just try and navigate Tokyo trains!  I got lost in a minor station, never mind being sure of getting on the right train.  At least in the city the important signs are also in English.  There is no one Tokyo train map, city is to big, with to many trains, owned by to many different private companies.
We did pretty good both times that we went to Japan, just had to check the maps multiple times. It was confusing at first but we picked up on it pretty quickly and never got lost (though we were a bit confused at a few points since to get to the ryokan we stayed at in the foothills of Fuji we had to take a bus into the middle of nowhere for the shuttle to the ryokan to pick us up). Also helped that if we did get turned around nearly everyone was eager to try and use their English to help us.

eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3178 on: July 09, 2014, 09:02:17 AM »
Buses in the US are no problem at all, just try and navigate Tokyo trains!  I got lost in a minor station, never mind being sure of getting on the right train.  At least in the city the important signs are also in English.  There is no one Tokyo train map, city is to big, with to many trains, owned by to many different private companies.

My wife and I had a pretty good experience in Thailand. It's amazing how many english signs there were! The above ground rail and the subway were so easy to navigate. Only time we missed a stop using public transportation was on the riverboat. Got to play with some pretty cute mutts (if you ignored all of their lesions) though at the stop until the next riverboat heading back came along! The dogs just wanted some company, even if you didn't want to touch them.

Fonzico

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3179 on: July 09, 2014, 10:06:13 AM »
My office is 1.5 blocks away from a Starbucks, and every once in a while the boss will buy fancypants coffee drinks for the staff (there are 4 of us) as a celebration for some little company victory.  We take turns making the run and bringing back the four drinks. 

When it's my turn to fetch the drinks, I walk (of course).  On their turns, every one of my coworkers drives that 1.5 blocks.

Is the coffee still hot when you bring it to them?

Still too hot to drink, in the summer.  In the winter it cools off more so I ask the barista to make it extra hot and it balances out just fine.  I've never noticed mine being cold or heard anyone else mention it, at least.

Just an FYI, there's no way to make it extra hot. Source: high school Dunkin Donuts employee. Best job I've ever had fun-wise.

There is at Starbucks - you can override the temp gauge on the milk steamer. Source: Managed an SBUX for a while. Good company, although I hated the job.

hermoninny

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3180 on: July 09, 2014, 12:57:48 PM »

What caught my attention about your post was the comfortable walking shoes. I've had two women in my office refuse to walk to lunch across the street because they were wearing very pricey uncomfortable shoes. One decided to drive instead to a lunch. Another refused to go once and ate at the local (bad) cafeteria instead of joining us. One recently decided to bring in some comfortable mocassins for these invitations to walk since she knows I refuse to get in a car to drive across the street for lunch. She wears the uncomfortable shoes while at work. She tried to convince her other friend to do the same. I guess it's progress....

I have never understood why anyone would ever buy uncomfortable shoes on purpose. I also have no sympathy for people who wear them. When i was single, many a date ended when I refused to listen to someone whine about their shoes. I would say that I didn't pick the shoes and as an adult you should have known better. I guess that is not very chivalrous, but it is probably my biggest pet peeve.

To be fair, most high heeled shoes I buy for work are uncomfortable until I break them in.  The break-in period varies based on how often I wear them and how much I walk in them.

That said, I keep two pairs of shoes at work - (1) an old, VERY broken in pair for most day-to-day walking around the office that, aside from boots, are probably my most comfortable high heels, and (2) a fancy-schmancy very non-Mustachian pair I recklessly bought in January that are about 75% of the way broken in.  My higher-ups are very fashion-oriented so I only wear these to meetings where they are in attendance.  I figure I can't return 'em, so I might as well use them to my advantage. 

I wear flip-flops to work on the days I drive and running shoes to work on the days I bike.  Therefore, I am always ready if I need to walk to a group lunch outside our building, or to pick my kids up from daycare at the end of the day.  You will almost never hear me complain about my shoes hurting! 

There are ways to be smart about fashion.  People just aren't smart anymore.

AlmostIndependent

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3181 on: July 09, 2014, 02:02:57 PM »
People just aren't smart anymore.

No kidding.

Daisy

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3182 on: July 09, 2014, 04:39:18 PM »
To be fair, most high heeled shoes I buy for work are uncomfortable until I break them in.  The break-in period varies based on how often I wear them and how much I walk in them.

I save my uncomfortable high heel shoe wearing to special events like weddings. I'm pretty tall as it is, and don't like to tower over people on a daily basis.

I've found that both the cheap and expensive spectrum of shoes tend to be the most uncomfortable. I like the sweet spot in the middle, saving money by buying on sale at the outlet stores.

I guess I am just too practical for daily usage at work. I love to walk around. I can't imagine losing out on workplace comraderie by refusing to go to lunch across the street with coworkers because of my choice of footwear. I do still wear somewhat stylish shoes (maybe not in the opinion of those pricey-shoe-coworkers) and sometimes receive compliments. But I buy them on sale and they have to be comfortable.

Metta

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3183 on: July 09, 2014, 07:07:37 PM »
One of my co-workers just bought a brand new BMW because his old one had turned 3 years old. (Apparently that's very old in car years.) He explained that it was the frugal thing to do because he didn't buy the one he wanted ($120,000) but paid just under $50,000 and they gave him $25,000 for his trade-in. Plus he has a full warranty on the new car. All in all, it was practically free, he said.

Then he explained that having a nice car was critical to advance in his career. What career requires a fancy car, you ask? Salesman, perhaps? No, programmer. Everyone knows that programmers are evaluated on the quality of their leather seats, right?

This is a person who told me earlier that he would never be able to retire because his children used up every dollar he earned. I am beginning to suspect that the problem for many people with children is not actually the children.

SpareChange

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3184 on: July 09, 2014, 11:14:34 PM »
Recently a bunch of us at work were gathered around during a low period...One of them seems really focused on a text she just got.

Me: "What's up?"

Her: "Oh, my husband just texted me about a great house for sale."

Coworkers and I: "Ummm. Didn't you just move into your new one less than a year ago???"

Her: " Yeah, but we're always looking. This one's in a neighborhood we've always liked."

This conversation happened the same week she took off work to meet with people to install granite countertops in her current home.

nikki

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3185 on: July 10, 2014, 12:28:48 AM »
CW complains about how expensive her dog is. She has to travel to another city (~5 hour bus ride away) to replace her passport because her dog chewed it up. And she can't afford the bus fare until after we get paid next week.

Then she asks if my fiancé will be working when he moves here. She might want him to walk her dog a couple times a day on Mondays, and maybe every day if they bond. 10,000w (~$10) a walk. I'd love for my dude to be able to earn that extra money, but I don't know if I'd feel right taking it from her after finding out about her financial struggles. There's more...

She says that she had to hock her favorite ring today to cover the cost of a ~$50 tow for her scooter which broke down. This is a fairly new scooter which she got purely to drive around our campus. Maximum walking distance is about 10 minutes, I'd guess. Completely unnecessary scooter because she's too nervous to drive it around town. Another CW pointed out that she's disabling herself, and I'd have to agree :-(

THEN she tells me about this great video series for learning Korean that only costs ~$100 to access. And THEN she tells me about paying someone ~$20 for Spanish lessons. Her goal is to retire in South America, but at this rate, at age 46 or so, I'm concerned that will never happen for her because she just throws money around  :-(

I'm just confused and a little sad for her. I wish I could help her, but I know my advice wouldn't be wanted.

MidwestGal

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3186 on: July 10, 2014, 06:41:43 AM »
Literally JUST heard:

"Oh, my daughter's phone bill is hundreds of bucks.  For her and her husband."

Eeek!  At least my CW goes on to say how dumb that is, and some other folks agreed that a smartphone generally isn't needed.  Maybe there are undercover mustachians here after all...

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3187 on: July 10, 2014, 07:20:14 AM »
Was at lunch with some folks who work at the same base I do - though not with me directly.  Rode in one of the ladies large/new SUV.  She made some comment about the benefits of having a new baby because "Momma's gotta get a new car".  (New car to go with the new baby?  I didn't get it then and still don't).

At lunch the three people with me were shocked to learn that my family of 5 is single income.  Comments along the lines of "HOW can you possibly afford only one income?"  (It is now worth noting that we are all government employees and therefore all of us fall in the same general salary ballpark.) 

I made a generic comment about it not always being easy - especially last year when saving for unpaid maternity leave in the midst of the government furlough debacle.  I also stated that we live carefully and, for example, drive older paid-for cars.

One of the ladies responses was "But even if you get your car paid off, you will still have to buy a new one eventually.  That's what I don't understand about people who think they can retire in their 50s or 60s.  Even if they have a paid for car and house at retirement that car won't last forever and they'll need a new one.  Then what will they do?"

General consensus around the table was that retirement is an unattainable pipe-dream.

GuitarStv

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3188 on: July 10, 2014, 07:36:54 AM »
Was at lunch with some folks who work at the same base I do - though not with me directly.  Rode in one of the ladies large/new SUV.  She made some comment about the benefits of having a new baby because "Momma's gotta get a new car".  (New car to go with the new baby?  I didn't get it then and still don't).

We own a 2005 Toyota Corolla.  I've had dozens of coworkers and family members comment on our vehicle situation now that we have a baby.

"You're going to need a minivan!" - ?
"You'll need a second car!" - We haven't needed a second car for the past eight years.
"You can't possibly fit all three of you in that little car" - It's got five seats.
"Small cars aren't safe to drive kids around in" - So maybe you should drive less with your kid to increase safety?
"How will you fit giant strollers in your little car?" - Why do I need a giant stroller?

I usually just glare at them until they stop, but seriously . . . wtf?

seanc0x0

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3189 on: July 10, 2014, 08:29:49 AM »

We own a 2005 Toyota Corolla.  I've had dozens of coworkers and family members comment on our vehicle situation now that we have a baby.

"You're going to need a minivan!" - ?
"You'll need a second car!" - We haven't needed a second car for the past eight years.
"You can't possibly fit all three of you in that little car" - It's got five seats.
"Small cars aren't safe to drive kids around in" - So maybe you should drive less with your kid to increase safety?
"How will you fit giant strollers in your little car?" - Why do I need a giant stroller?

I usually just glare at them until they stop, but seriously . . . wtf?

We got a lot of that when we had our first child, and it eventually stopped when we did just fine with our Honda Fit and one kid. Now it's coming back following the announcement that we're going to have a second child. We have plenty of room for another carseat back there, but you'd think it's impossible listening to what people say.  People are generally not very imaginative or adaptive, I guess.

zhelud

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3190 on: July 10, 2014, 08:47:19 AM »
To be fair, most high heeled shoes I buy for work are uncomfortable until I break them in.  The break-in period varies based on how often I wear them and how much I walk in them.

I save my uncomfortable high heel shoe wearing to special events like weddings. I'm pretty tall as it is, and don't like to tower over people on a daily basis.

I've found that both the cheap and expensive spectrum of shoes tend to be the most uncomfortable. I like the sweet spot in the middle, saving money by buying on sale at the outlet stores.

I guess I am just too practical for daily usage at work. I love to walk around. I can't imagine losing out on workplace comraderie by refusing to go to lunch across the street with coworkers because of my choice of footwear. I do still wear somewhat stylish shoes (maybe not in the opinion of those pricey-shoe-coworkers) and sometimes receive compliments. But I buy them on sale and they have to be comfortable.

Since 9/11, I haven't worn shoes at work that I couldn't walk home in. (I was 8 months pregnant then, and I walked home- fortunately I was able to change to comfy shoes in my office before leaving.)

eyePod

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3191 on: July 10, 2014, 09:27:08 AM »
Literally JUST heard:

"Oh, my daughter's phone bill is hundreds of bucks.  For her and her husband."

Eeek!  At least my CW goes on to say how dumb that is, and some other folks agreed that a smartphone generally isn't needed.  Maybe there are undercover mustachians here after all...

One of mine told me that she thought of me when paying her bill since mine is at least half (RW) compared to her bill!

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3192 on: July 10, 2014, 09:34:02 AM »

We own a 2005 Toyota Corolla.  I've had dozens of coworkers and family members comment on our vehicle situation now that we have a baby.

"You're going to need a minivan!" - ?
"You'll need a second car!" - We haven't needed a second car for the past eight years.
"You can't possibly fit all three of you in that little car" - It's got five seats.
"Small cars aren't safe to drive kids around in" - So maybe you should drive less with your kid to increase safety?
"How will you fit giant strollers in your little car?" - Why do I need a giant stroller?

I usually just glare at them until they stop, but seriously . . . wtf?

We got a lot of that when we had our first child, and it eventually stopped when we did just fine with our Honda Fit and one kid. Now it's coming back following the announcement that we're going to have a second child. We have plenty of room for another carseat back there, but you'd think it's impossible listening to what people say.  People are generally not very imaginative or adaptive, I guess.

I have 3 kids (4 and under) in an 05 Subaru Forester, and most people questioned if it was possible before the 3rd one was here, but now no one really says anything.

At work, I've seen a car (equivalent of a Honda Accord) with 3 car seats in the back, but I wouldn't do that myself, as the extra cargo space of the Forester is incredibly useful.

Kmp2

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3193 on: July 10, 2014, 09:40:53 AM »
I got lots of comments from my inlaws when we got married about my car... an '04 civic with 180k km's
- oh is she going to get a new car
- she deserves a new car
- time to replace that old beater

and again when I got pregnant, my SIL actually told my husband he should buy me a new car - a nice big one to keep me and baby safe...
I can afford to buy my own damn car when I'm ready thank-you! And we didn't tell her I was still biking to work in my first trimester...

Fonzico

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3194 on: July 10, 2014, 10:24:00 AM »
I have a positive one!

Was chatting with one of our sub-contractors the other day. He is my age (28). He put $100,000 downpayment on a townhouse a couple years ago (not sure how much it cost, but ~$200-250,000 would be pretty likely in the area it's in), and he expects to have it paid off within two years. At the very least has his TFSA maxed out, not sure what else. but he expects to retire by 40.

Colour me impressed :) I was tempted to ask him if he was a mustachian, but suspected that he wasn't, since he probably would have been piling that money into investment accounts rather than paying off what is undoubtably a very low rate mortgage, but still. I'll have to mention the website the next time I see him.

The only thing that made me a little sad is that he said he didn't want to get married or have children since it would derail his financial plans. I just nodded sympathetically, but damn dude, you really can have both! But I can see how someone would think that, looking at the world around them. For the record, I don't want kids myself, but I would still feel that way if I had all the money in the world.

kyanamerinas

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3195 on: July 10, 2014, 10:36:20 AM »

We own a 2005 Toyota Corolla.  I've had dozens of coworkers and family members comment on our vehicle situation now that we have a baby.

"You're going to need a minivan!" - ?
"You'll need a second car!" - We haven't needed a second car for the past eight years.
"You can't possibly fit all three of you in that little car" - It's got five seats.
"Small cars aren't safe to drive kids around in" - So maybe you should drive less with your kid to increase safety?
"How will you fit giant strollers in your little car?" - Why do I need a giant stroller?

I usually just glare at them until they stop, but seriously . . . wtf?

We got a lot of that when we had our first child, and it eventually stopped when we did just fine with our Honda Fit and one kid. Now it's coming back following the announcement that we're going to have a second child. We have plenty of room for another carseat back there, but you'd think it's impossible listening to what people say.  People are generally not very imaginative or adaptive, I guess.

I have 3 kids (4 and under) in an 05 Subaru Forester, and most people questioned if it was possible before the 3rd one was here, but now no one really says anything.

At work, I've seen a car (equivalent of a Honda Accord) with 3 car seats in the back, but I wouldn't do that myself, as the extra cargo space of the Forester is incredibly useful.

i really don't understand the whole american family car thing. we ran a fairly run-of-the-mill hatchback even with three teenagers, no problems. surely that's harder than one small baby? (yeah, it got cosy but no one died or lost limbs because of it!)

odput

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3196 on: July 10, 2014, 10:44:35 AM »
Colour me impressed :) I was tempted to ask him if he was a mustachian

It's for these very instances I wish we had some secret code phrase that we could work into everyday conversation so we could covertly identify ourselves to other (potential) mustachians, or see if they respond appropriately.

"The sun is shining..."

Paul der Krake

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3197 on: July 10, 2014, 10:49:50 AM »
i really don't understand the whole american family car thing. we ran a fairly run-of-the-mill hatchback even with three teenagers, no problems. surely that's harder than one small baby? (yeah, it got cosy but no one died or lost limbs because of it!)
People in the US seem to think that they are the first humans to procreate, and NOTHING should get in the way of the safety of their statistically very average progeny. Given how much they pay for each childbirth and how precarious their financial situation is, they're really just looking out for their "investments". Some of the things my French-born mother did to her children like carrying us in infant bike seats and giving us some diluted red wine with meals at a young age would have resulted in people calling the cops on her, had we been raised here.

SomedayStache

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3198 on: July 10, 2014, 11:07:00 AM »
Was at lunch with some folks who work at the same base I do - though not with me directly.  Rode in one of the ladies large/new SUV.  She made some comment about the benefits of having a new baby because "Momma's gotta get a new car".  (New car to go with the new baby?  I didn't get it then and still don't).

We own a 2005 Toyota Corolla.  I've had dozens of coworkers and family members comment on our vehicle situation now that we have a baby.

"You're going to need a minivan!" - ?
"You'll need a second car!" - We haven't needed a second car for the past eight years.
"You can't possibly fit all three of you in that little car" - It's got five seats.
"Small cars aren't safe to drive kids around in" - So maybe you should drive less with your kid to increase safety?
"How will you fit giant strollers in your little car?" - Why do I need a giant stroller?

I usually just glare at them until they stop, but seriously . . . wtf?

GuitarStv - we actually have 3 kids and a 2005 Toyota Corolla as well!  Current setup involves a rear-facing Radian, a forward facing Complete Air 65, and a Graco Snugride.  So, yes, you can do it!

Edited to add that I thought you were saying you had 3 kids.  Upon re-reading your quote it appears you only have 1 child.  Therefore, WTF does everyone around you think is required to carry two adults and one child???
« Last Edit: July 10, 2014, 11:08:53 AM by SomedayStache »

BigRed

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #3199 on: July 10, 2014, 11:30:06 AM »
To be fair, most high heeled shoes I buy for work are uncomfortable until I break them in.  The break-in period varies based on how often I wear them and how much I walk in them.

I save my uncomfortable high heel shoe wearing to special events like weddings. I'm pretty tall as it is, and don't like to tower over people on a daily basis.

I've found that both the cheap and expensive spectrum of shoes tend to be the most uncomfortable. I like the sweet spot in the middle, saving money by buying on sale at the outlet stores.

I guess I am just too practical for daily usage at work. I love to walk around. I can't imagine losing out on workplace comraderie by refusing to go to lunch across the street with coworkers because of my choice of footwear. I do still wear somewhat stylish shoes (maybe not in the opinion of those pricey-shoe-coworkers) and sometimes receive compliments. But I buy them on sale and they have to be comfortable.

Since 9/11, I haven't worn shoes at work that I couldn't walk home in. (I was 8 months pregnant then, and I walked home- fortunately I was able to change to comfy shoes in my office before leaving.)

I'm curious what infant car seat you used with the Fit.  We test drove a fit, and didn't have success fitting our Graco SnugRide in there.  I was surprised, my goal was to convince my wife to move from our Accord to a Fit.  Obviously, I failed to do that, with the failure of that test, and additionally the Fits we found also seemed badly overpriced.  But, I think if the car seat had fit, we would have solved that problem with some diligence.  So, I'm curious.  Personally I think the Accord has too much space in the back seat, and not enough in the trunk, and gets terrible gas mileage.