Author Topic: Failure to Launch - Case Study  (Read 1284 times)

Slee_stack

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Failure to Launch - Case Study
« on: May 23, 2018, 11:43:20 AM »

ysette9

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #1 on: May 23, 2018, 12:00:17 PM »
I just saw that on NPR. Tangentially I find it sad that people will see his age, and only remember “millennial” and “good-for-nothing entitled mooch” and conveniently forget that he doesn’t represent an entire cohort of Americans.

I feel sorry for his kid.
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fell-like-rain

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #2 on: May 23, 2018, 12:01:42 PM »
The American stigma around folks living with their parents is really fascinating. Obviously, this is an extreme case where the guy became dependent, but what's wrong with living with your folks while young and single? Historically, people didn't move out until they were married, and sometimes not even then.

ysette9

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #3 on: May 23, 2018, 12:06:30 PM »
I think it is the part where he doesn’t have a job, doesn’t contribute to the household, and has been asked by his parents multiple times to leave that is causing ire. I can’t speak for everyone, but I feel like there is more acceptance of adult kids living with parents now if they are doing that while being productive members of society. My sister used that as a means to save for a down payment on her place. I see that as smart. On the other hand, our cousins living at home at 30 despite a good college education because he can’t or won’t work.... not so much.
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acroy

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #4 on: May 23, 2018, 12:18:15 PM »
I saw that, pretty funny
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mm1970

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #5 on: May 23, 2018, 01:20:02 PM »
I think it is the part where he doesnít have a job, doesnít contribute to the household, and has been asked by his parents multiple times to leave that is causing ire. I canít speak for everyone, but I feel like there is more acceptance of adult kids living with parents now if they are doing that while being productive members of society. My sister used that as a means to save for a down payment on her place. I see that as smart. On the other hand, our cousins living at home at 30 despite a good college education because he canít or wonít work.... not so much.
+1

Kimera757

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #6 on: May 24, 2018, 05:17:13 AM »
The American stigma around folks living with their parents is really fascinating. Obviously, this is an extreme case where the guy became dependent, but what's wrong with living with your folks while young and single? Historically, people didn't move out until they were married, and sometimes not even then.

Living with parents isn't a problem. Being a free-loader is a problem. And it will get worse; his parents are going to retire and then die at some point, so what is he going to do then?

In the States, a single employable person can't get on welfare (I dn't believe you qualify for TANF if you have no children, and if you did, no more than five years). In Canada they could, until they reach "retirement" age.

I can't read the National Post article on this (because it hates my adblock, even when I turn it off), so I'll read it at work. But the title includes the words "You Have To Work" which the freeloader didn't.

Slee_stack

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #7 on: May 24, 2018, 07:30:34 AM »
Oh boy...give a person enough rope...

https://www.buzzfeed.com/tanyachen/30-year-old-man-child-cnn-interview?utm_term=.wp7NZpOV3#.mqnOa7k50

I wonder if this guy hasn't spent too much time in the Weed.  He has classic symptoms of an over-the-top weed addled brain.  Everything is everyone else's fault...paranoia...reality disconnect..
« Last Edit: May 24, 2018, 07:34:24 AM by Slee_stack »

Just Joe

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #8 on: May 24, 2018, 07:40:22 AM »
He needs to open a window while building his model airplanes... ;)

Okay, he's an awkward fellow. Quit talking. Just get a job and move out. Why confirm that you are awkward with poorly delivered conversation?

What worries me is that being on TV might have made his chances of getting work even lower... Who needs a job interview with this guy when you can watch the clip?

marion10

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #9 on: May 24, 2018, 08:01:54 AM »
Also his parents mentioned telling him to sell his weapons. There may be also be afraid to have him in the house.

Laura33

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #10 on: May 24, 2018, 09:58:45 AM »
I think this is sad, and it's a shame it is being taken as an example of "these kids nowdays."  I heard from other sources that he lost custody of his kid, that he has a restraining order that prevents him from being within a certain distance of his kid, and that that's why the parents kicked him out (so they could see their grandchild).  IDK, restraining order + guns + that level of entitled obstreporousness suggests a tinge of personality disorder/mental illness, in a way that would scare me.  I'd want him gone too -- and then I'd change all the locks and install an alarm.
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Slee_stack

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Re: Failure to Launch - Case Study
« Reply #11 on: May 24, 2018, 10:16:08 AM »
Hopefully nobody stereotypes a generation from this guy....

I have (3) interns I'm mentoring at the moment and all of them are incredibly bright, excited individuals that want to learn and get things done.

Now they aren't an entire generation either...but obviously there's extremes everywhere...


I knew folks of my own age who were extremely pot addled and had similar lack of interest in supporting themselves.  They weren't as bad as this guy here though...  I suspect (and hope) very, very few are.