Author Topic: Overheard at Work  (Read 9183600 times)

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10700 on: October 02, 2015, 03:12:39 PM »
"My (can't recall the vehicle type) is in the shop so I have a loaner car today. God- I can barely get in and out of a car anymore since I'm so used to my SUV. I can't believe what a pain it is."

Edit: Apparently this will be the topic of conversation all day. She is on her THIRD person of how hard it is to get out of a car, and how can anyone own a car when you could buy an SUV?
I don't have an SUV, but I really do appreciate the height of my "crossover" (HHR).
There are several economy hatchbacks on the market, no reason to get a large SUV if you want a car with headroom. 

Tjat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10701 on: October 02, 2015, 07:05:58 PM »
I may have posted this before. My work provides free coffee, generally green mountain. They also sell fancy Starbucks coffee and have a handful of commercial coffee shops/doughnut stores nearby. It astounds me that a non-zero amount of people choose to pay for a coffee EVERY DAY when there is a perfectly good name-brand alternative that is motherf*ckin FREE that is more convenient!

Well I take that back, there's no pump to put a pint of frosting in your cup because you can't handle how real coffee tastes.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10702 on: October 02, 2015, 07:58:32 PM »
"My (can't recall the vehicle type) is in the shop so I have a loaner car today. God- I can barely get in and out of a car anymore since I'm so used to my SUV. I can't believe what a pain it is."

Edit: Apparently this will be the topic of conversation all day. She is on her THIRD person of how hard it is to get out of a car, and how can anyone own a car when you could buy an SUV?
I don't have an SUV, but I really do appreciate the height of my "crossover" (HHR).
There are several economy hatchbacks on the market, no reason to get a large SUV if you want a car with headroom.

Since this is about getting in and out of the car, isn't this r about distance from the ground, not headroom?

former player

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10703 on: October 03, 2015, 01:55:35 AM »
"My (can't recall the vehicle type) is in the shop so I have a loaner car today. God- I can barely get in and out of a car anymore since I'm so used to my SUV. I can't believe what a pain it is."

Edit: Apparently this will be the topic of conversation all day. She is on her THIRD person of how hard it is to get out of a car, and how can anyone own a car when you could buy an SUV?
I don't have an SUV, but I really do appreciate the height of my "crossover" (HHR).
There are several economy hatchbacks on the market, no reason to get a large SUV if you want a car with headroom.

Since this is about getting in and out of the car, isn't this r about distance from the ground, not headroom?
Depends what the problem is.  If it's knees, then the problem is seat height.  If it's height, then it's height of car body.  If it's obesity, it's door size.

Seppia

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10704 on: October 03, 2015, 05:37:26 AM »

I may have posted this before. My work provides free coffee, generally green mountain. They also sell fancy Starbucks coffee and have a handful of commercial coffee shops/doughnut stores nearby. It astounds me that a non-zero amount of people choose to pay for a coffee EVERY DAY when there is a perfectly good name-brand alternative that is motherf*ckin FREE that is more convenient!

Well I take that back, there's no pump to put a pint of frosting in your cup because you can't handle how real coffee tastes.

In my case it's even worse: I work for an Italian company so good, free coffee is considered a primary human right.
We have free Lavazza cups, and still some people spend the $3 something on their Starbucks latte almost every day.

lemanfan

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10705 on: October 03, 2015, 06:47:32 AM »
In my case it's even worse: I work for an Italian company so good, free coffee is considered a primary human right.
We have free Lavazza cups, and still some people spend the $3 something on their Starbucks latte almost every day.

Now thats a special kind of stooopid. 

teadirt

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10706 on: October 05, 2015, 10:38:41 AM »
In my case it's even worse: I work for an Italian company so good, free coffee is considered a primary human right.
We have free Lavazza cups, and still some people spend the $3 something on their Starbucks latte almost every day.

Now thats a special kind of stooopid.

I live in a LCOL part of the country, and bought a Starbucks Latte last week with some coworkers (I feel obligated to mention, the free office coffee gets the job done just fine, and I drink that 95% of the time. I chose to go just for the walk and cameraderie, and I do like lattes)...

Anyway, the point I wanted to make was that my small (or whatever the f*** they call it) latte was OVER $4! That's the plain model, just milk and espresso. Everything else costs even more.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10707 on: October 05, 2015, 11:12:10 AM »
In my case it's even worse: I work for an Italian company so good, free coffee is considered a primary human right.
We have free Lavazza cups, and still some people spend the $3 something on their Starbucks latte almost every day.

Now thats a special kind of stooopid.

I live in a LCOL part of the country, and bought a Starbucks Latte last week with some coworkers (I feel obligated to mention, the free office coffee gets the job done just fine, and I drink that 95% of the time. I chose to go just for the walk and cameraderie, and I do like lattes)...


I doubt there are many, even here at MMM, that would begrudge you a treat. That's how I look at such things. If you are going with colleagues, then that's akin to pitching in for an office Fantasy Football or March Madness pool, even if you care little for it. It's a little money but can get you closer to your coworkers, which can help your career and make life a little better.

Skalm

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10708 on: October 05, 2015, 05:47:19 PM »
My job just attracts these guys or something...

Coworker buys an $800 car for his girlfriend's daughter. Daughter has trouble holding down jobs, has a kid, has an eviction on record and is currently couch surfing. The daughter's boyfriend has outstanding warrants and works under the table.

So daughter, within a week of having this car, goes and gets a title loan on the car. And then doesn't pay it back. Car gets repo'd within two months of her receiving it.

Now daughter wants to get an apartment and needs a cosigner, which she's asking coworker for. He said no.

gimp

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10709 on: October 05, 2015, 06:51:40 PM »
Your coworker is a stand-up guy. He took an $800 gamble to help someone out, but he's not an idiot and cut his losses.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10710 on: October 05, 2015, 07:41:51 PM »
Your coworker is a stand-up guy. He took an $800 gamble to help someone out, but he's not an idiot and cut his losses.

That's a good point, I hope that's how he views it.

eljefe-speaks

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10711 on: October 06, 2015, 02:04:49 PM »
Co-worker: As far as TVs go, I really believe you should just spend whatever makes you happy.  I have never yet heard someone say, "I wish I hadn't spent so much on my TV."

This was in the middle of a discussion about a 65inch 4k curved tv vs. the 55inch version.
I don't think the curved TVs are even all that nice.  It cuts down on the number of people you can invite over to watch a movie with you, since you can't fan out as much and still see the TV.  I don't own a TV at all, so maybe I'm mistaken, but that's my $0.02.

I think the curved TV actually makes it easier to see from the sides and that's the whole point of it being curved.

I was curious about all the talk so I checked out ArsTechnica's take. The curve actually makes it harder to see if you're sitting off to the sides. It's arguably better if you're sitting in the middle.

Yeah that's what I've heard. Curved TV's as they currently are, are great if you are sitting in that sweet spot, but otherwise largely not worth the additional costs. That said, as costs go down and technology and research go up, it's possible that they will make sense in the future.

Curved TV is a gimmicky way to get people to buy ANOTHER TV. Wow, look everybody - it's curved! Nothing more. 

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10712 on: October 06, 2015, 02:23:44 PM »
I got 3 invitations for work Xmas parties, all >$100 a head, the most expensive one $160 a head.  Included are staff who make under 40K a year. Holy guacamole!
Guess who's being a party pooper? Man, I'm saving like nearly $500 by not going.

WTF it's the social norm for workers to pay to attend a Christmas party?

Not at my company, I'm proud to say. Each year we get dinner at a local Chinese buffet. It is paid for by me. Of course, I have a grand total of 6 employees, and I do invite back 2 retired employees in case they are interested. Also, it just so happens that all of my employees are unmarried save for one, so that also likely reduces my expenses a little bit.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10713 on: October 06, 2015, 02:56:12 PM »
Your coworker is a stand-up guy. He took an $800 gamble to help someone out, but he's not an idiot and cut his losses.

Yup. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. Small loss this incident is better than a bigger loss in the future. Now he has a great burn excuse to stay away from gf's kin.

tofuchampion

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10714 on: October 06, 2015, 07:00:19 PM »
Can I bitch about something not money related?

Coworker is upset because her dog is missing.  Fair enough.  Except:

1.  Dog has run away before.
2.  Dog was not on a leash or in a fence; they just let it go outside freely (which is illegal where I live, not to mention stupid anywhere).
3.  Dog is not neutered (it's 3 years old; this should have been done 2 1/2 years ago).
4.  Dog is trained/disciplined by "popping," which I assume means she just hits it when it doesn't do what she wants.

I'm biting my tongue so hard right now.  OF COURSE your damn dog ran away.  You didn't train it, it's not fixed so it's more prone to wandering off, it's done this before, and you just.... let it go, no leash, no supervision, etc?  This is your fault, not the dog's.  Dog is just being a dog.

Guess whose dog died last weekend? FB post said, "We'll never know exactly what happened, but we know he died doing what he loved most - hunting." Sounds to me like he ran off again. FFS.

I had to unfriend her. This was 100% preventable, and the only sympathy I have is for the dog.

LeRainDrop

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10715 on: October 06, 2015, 07:06:08 PM »
Can I bitch about something not money related?

Coworker is upset because her dog is missing.  Fair enough.  Except:

1.  Dog has run away before.
2.  Dog was not on a leash or in a fence; they just let it go outside freely (which is illegal where I live, not to mention stupid anywhere).
3.  Dog is not neutered (it's 3 years old; this should have been done 2 1/2 years ago).
4.  Dog is trained/disciplined by "popping," which I assume means she just hits it when it doesn't do what she wants.

I'm biting my tongue so hard right now.  OF COURSE your damn dog ran away.  You didn't train it, it's not fixed so it's more prone to wandering off, it's done this before, and you just.... let it go, no leash, no supervision, etc?  This is your fault, not the dog's.  Dog is just being a dog.

Guess whose dog died last weekend? FB post said, "We'll never know exactly what happened, but we know he died doing what he loved most - hunting." Sounds to me like he ran off again. FFS.

I had to unfriend her. This was 100% preventable, and the only sympathy I have is for the dog.

Ugh!  This is so sad!  As the owner, she was responsible for protecting that dog and ensuring his well-being.  I hope she never has the privilege of owning another pet, or if she does, that she learns a very good lesson from this one.  Doubtful she'll do any better the next time, but we can still hope.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10716 on: October 06, 2015, 07:08:52 PM »
Can I bitch about something not money related?

Coworker is upset because her dog is missing.  Fair enough.  Except:

1.  Dog has run away before.
2.  Dog was not on a leash or in a fence; they just let it go outside freely (which is illegal where I live, not to mention stupid anywhere).
3.  Dog is not neutered (it's 3 years old; this should have been done 2 1/2 years ago).
4.  Dog is trained/disciplined by "popping," which I assume means she just hits it when it doesn't do what she wants.

I'm biting my tongue so hard right now.  OF COURSE your damn dog ran away.  You didn't train it, it's not fixed so it's more prone to wandering off, it's done this before, and you just.... let it go, no leash, no supervision, etc?  This is your fault, not the dog's.  Dog is just being a dog.

Guess whose dog died last weekend? FB post said, "We'll never know exactly what happened, but we know he died doing what he loved most - hunting." Sounds to me like he ran off again. FFS.

I had to unfriend her. This was 100% preventable, and the only sympathy I have is for the dog.

I concur, I feel for the dog. There's no such thing as a bad dog, just a bad dog owner.

marty998

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10717 on: October 07, 2015, 12:42:05 AM »
Can I bitch about something not money related?

Coworker is upset because her dog is missing.  Fair enough.  Except:

1.  Dog has run away before.
2.  Dog was not on a leash or in a fence; they just let it go outside freely (which is illegal where I live, not to mention stupid anywhere).
3.  Dog is not neutered (it's 3 years old; this should have been done 2 1/2 years ago).
4.  Dog is trained/disciplined by "popping," which I assume means she just hits it when it doesn't do what she wants.

I'm biting my tongue so hard right now.  OF COURSE your damn dog ran away.  You didn't train it, it's not fixed so it's more prone to wandering off, it's done this before, and you just.... let it go, no leash, no supervision, etc?  This is your fault, not the dog's.  Dog is just being a dog.

Guess whose dog died last weekend? FB post said, "We'll never know exactly what happened, but we know he died doing what he loved most - hunting." Sounds to me like he ran off again. FFS.

I had to unfriend her. This was 100% preventable, and the only sympathy I have is for the dog.

I concur, I feel for the dog. There's no such thing as a bad dog, just a bad dog owner.

Child and parent?

Oops, I didn't say that out loud did I! That's a big can of worms...

Reynold

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10718 on: October 07, 2015, 09:24:08 AM »
Your coworker is a stand-up guy. He took an $800 gamble to help someone out, but he's not an idiot and cut his losses.

I did something like this, on a smaller scale.  We'd just moved to a new state and introduced ourselves to the neighbors, and 2 days later the 18ish year old son of one of them, who we had talked to briefly, knocked on the door to borrow $5 for gas for his car to get to his practice with his garage band.  I loaned him $10, figuring that would be a good test of whether he was reliable.  If so, we could hire him for house sitting, snow shoveling when we traveled, etc. 

About 5 months later, I brought it up in conversation, in case he had forgotten (it has happened to me), but he was short of money at the time.  About a year after the initial borrowing, he saw me getting out of the car, came over and gave me the $10 with a brief apology for being so late, he had finally gotten a job.  So he is not dishonest, just generally irresponsible.  It was worth risking $10 to me to find out what a neighbor was like. 

Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

LennStar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10719 on: October 07, 2015, 09:52:10 AM »
Well, if it is no big deal for you, how about we double what you have to give me back? Or is this still too small a sum?

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10720 on: October 07, 2015, 09:54:34 AM »
he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?". 

I cannot even imagine having this kind of attitude. If I owe someone even $1, it is like a big weight over my head until I clear it up.

solon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10721 on: October 07, 2015, 09:58:07 AM »
Your coworker is a stand-up guy. He took an $800 gamble to help someone out, but he's not an idiot and cut his losses.

I did something like this, on a smaller scale.  We'd just moved to a new state and introduced ourselves to the neighbors, and 2 days later the 18ish year old son of one of them, who we had talked to briefly, knocked on the door to borrow $5 for gas for his car to get to his practice with his garage band.  I loaned him $10, figuring that would be a good test of whether he was reliable.  If so, we could hire him for house sitting, snow shoveling when we traveled, etc. 

About 5 months later, I brought it up in conversation, in case he had forgotten (it has happened to me), but he was short of money at the time.  About a year after the initial borrowing, he saw me getting out of the car, came over and gave me the $10 with a brief apology for being so late, he had finally gotten a job.  So he is not dishonest, just generally irresponsible.  It was worth risking $10 to me to find out what a neighbor was like. 

Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

The real genius is next time he asks to borrow money, you don't need to feel guilty declining the request.

FatCat

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10722 on: October 07, 2015, 01:52:51 PM »
Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

I quit loaning people money because I got tired of it. They owe me forever. They don't intend to pay unless I ask for it. When I ask for the money back they say, "Why do you want it back? Do you really need it?"

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10723 on: October 07, 2015, 02:06:10 PM »
Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

I quit loaning people money because I got tired of it. They owe me forever. They don't intend to pay unless I ask for it. When I ask for the money back they say, "Why do you want it back? Do you really need it?"

"Do you really need it" drives me nuts. No, I don't really need it. I also don't really need beer, and at that, good beer. I don't need internet. I don't need a lot of things. But where does it stop? Most people that say that have more things/luxuries than me, although I'd guess that my stuff is nicer than their stuff.

I've stopped loaning money to people other than when they're not short, they just don't have it (i.e. need cash at a cash only place, or my brother who's funds were held up due to a bank transfer, etc.) Even then it is a gift, not a loan. If they give it back, lovely.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10724 on: October 07, 2015, 02:23:19 PM »
Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

I quit loaning people money because I got tired of it. They owe me forever. They don't intend to pay unless I ask for it. When I ask for the money back they say, "Why do you want it back? Do you really need it?"

This is why I give, not loan.  If they ever give back the $20 they borrowed, great.  If they never do, I worry not, because I never expected it back to start with.

obrero

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10725 on: October 07, 2015, 07:33:01 PM »
I'm sure this has been covered before, but coworkers talking about how as soon as their current $40k truck is paid off, they're going to upgrade to one of the new 1/2 ton trucks that are coming with a diesel option, for the price of $60k.  They will be able to get 20mpg so its a good deal.  I don't know how these people afford it, we make only slightly more than the median income in the U.S. 

I try to drop nuggets of knowledge about depreciation, how my second 100k miles on my truck (my chevy colorado that I paid 13k for, new) will be much more affordable that the first 100k miles, most are uninterested but once in a while someone seems to give a crap about their future selves. 

obrero

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10726 on: October 07, 2015, 07:37:52 PM »
Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

I quit loaning people money because I got tired of it. They owe me forever. They don't intend to pay unless I ask for it. When I ask for the money back they say, "Why do you want it back? Do you really need it?"

This is why I give, not loan.  If they ever give back the $20 they borrowed, great.  If they never do, I worry not, because I never expected it back to start with.

It's good that when people are broke and they ask for money they will first ask for a small amount, 10 or 20 dollars, to get them to the next paycheck or whatever.  If the amount is small, I'll let them borrow it and use it as a test of whether or not I can trust that person.  Usually someone who's finances are so out of order that they cannot scrape up 20$ is untrustworthy, but I give the benefit of the doubt. 

Tallgirl1204

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10727 on: October 08, 2015, 09:42:59 AM »
Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

I quit loaning people money because I got tired of it. They owe me forever. They don't intend to pay unless I ask for it. When I ask for the money back they say, "Why do you want it back? Do you really need it?"

This is why I give, not loan.  If they ever give back the $20 they borrowed, great.  If they never do, I worry not, because I never expected it back to start with.

It's good that when people are broke and they ask for money they will first ask for a small amount, 10 or 20 dollars, to get them to the next paycheck or whatever.  If the amount is small, I'll let them borrow it and use it as a test of whether or not I can trust that person.  Usually someone who's finances are so out of order that they cannot scrape up 20$ is untrustworthy, but I give the benefit of the doubt.

Among close friends and coworkers, money is fungible and I just try to make sure I lend slightly more than I borrow (always lunch-sized sums, picking up each others' checks or paying for coffee etc.).  Any farther out ("ack!  i left my wallet at home and need $10 for a sandwich for this business lunch!" to someone I don't see regularly) and it gets paid back the next day.  I can't imagine a coworker not paying back a loan to a person with whom they have only a professional relationship.  And if it's "only 40 dollars" I would say "then it's no big deal for you to pay me back."

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10728 on: October 08, 2015, 09:45:23 AM »
Contrast this with a similar situation with a well paid, professional co-worker some years earlier, where I loaned him $40 because he was short of cash, and when I brought it up a couple of months later, he scowled and said "What is the big deal about $40?".  I didn't make an issue of it, but learned something useful from that as well.  When someone says "What is the big deal about (some amount of money they owe you)", it is typically a big deal to them.  I don't recall if he was one of the co-workers who panicked when payroll was late by a couple of days one time due to some kind of software messup. . .

I quit loaning people money because I got tired of it. They owe me forever. They don't intend to pay unless I ask for it. When I ask for the money back they say, "Why do you want it back? Do you really need it?"

This is why I give, not loan.  If they ever give back the $20 they borrowed, great.  If they never do, I worry not, because I never expected it back to start with.

It's good that when people are broke and they ask for money they will first ask for a small amount, 10 or 20 dollars, to get them to the next paycheck or whatever.  If the amount is small, I'll let them borrow it and use it as a test of whether or not I can trust that person.  Usually someone who's finances are so out of order that they cannot scrape up 20$ is untrustworthy, but I give the benefit of the doubt.

Among close friends and coworkers, money is fungible and I just try to make sure I lend slightly more than I borrow (always lunch-sized sums, picking up each others' checks or paying for coffee etc.).  Any farther out ("ack!  i left my wallet at home and need $10 for a sandwich for this business lunch!" to someone I don't see regularly) and it gets paid back the next day.  I can't imagine a coworker not paying back a loan to a person with whom they have only a professional relationship.  And if it's "only 40 dollars" I would say "then it's no big deal for you to pay me back."

Yup, I get that a lot with customers that want me to drop my price by a quarter cause "it's only a quarter...," to which my usual comment is, "Then if it's only a quarter, you won't mind paying it." All too often a customer will tell me that they can buy my product cheaper, and my response is almost always, "If you can buy it cheaper than you should, but I might be out of stock should you need it later," and I usually will laugh when they call back a week later to try to get it as sometimes I might have sold that item out.

HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10729 on: October 08, 2015, 09:49:42 AM »
mgosam, just curious, what kind of wholesale business do you do? You can PM if you prefer.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10730 on: October 08, 2015, 10:11:05 AM »
mgosam, just curious, what kind of wholesale business do you do? You can PM if you prefer.

Sent you a PM

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10731 on: October 08, 2015, 10:23:16 AM »
I'm sure this has been covered before, but coworkers talking about how as soon as their current $40k truck is paid off, they're going to upgrade to one of the new 1/2 ton trucks that are coming with a diesel option, for the price of $60k.  They will be able to get 20mpg so its a good deal.  I don't know how these people afford it, we make only slightly more than the median income in the U.S. 

Well consider how much you're putting into savings/retirement.  If that number were zero, what kind of car/truck could you get with a 60-month loan for that amount per month?  Sometimes I wonder as well how people buy the things they do, then I realize if I wanted to stop saving I could probably afford payments on a Maserati.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10732 on: October 08, 2015, 10:36:53 AM »
I'm sure this has been covered before, but coworkers talking about how as soon as their current $40k truck is paid off, they're going to upgrade to one of the new 1/2 ton trucks that are coming with a diesel option, for the price of $60k.  They will be able to get 20mpg so its a good deal.  I don't know how these people afford it, we make only slightly more than the median income in the U.S. 

Well consider how much you're putting into savings/retirement.  If that number were zero, what kind of car/truck could you get with a 60-month loan for that amount per month?  Sometimes I wonder as well how people buy the things they do, then I realize if I wanted to stop saving I could probably afford payments on a Maserati.

If I wasn't saving for retirement a financed McLaren or Lamborghini would not be mathematically out of reach...

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10733 on: October 08, 2015, 10:46:54 AM »
If I wasn't saving for retirement a financed McLaren or Lamborghini would not be mathematically out of reach...

Well now I'm curious.  I had to figure out the total loan amount that equaled monthly payments of my current savings rate, at 3% interest.  Then went here:

http://www.thecarconnection.com/price/new,price-range-85000-1420000_by-price

and kept clicking till I got to that number.  I could be driving a 2015 Ferrari 458 Italia (no options).  Or if I wanted to be frugal I could buy James Bond's Aston Martin DB9 with all the options.

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10734 on: October 08, 2015, 10:56:45 AM »
If I wasn't saving for retirement a financed McLaren or Lamborghini would not be mathematically out of reach...

Well now I'm curious.  I had to figure out the total loan amount that equaled monthly payments of my current savings rate, at 3% interest.  Then went here:

http://www.thecarconnection.com/price/new,price-range-85000-1420000_by-price

and kept clicking till I got to that number.  I could be driving a 2015 Ferrari 458 Italia (no options).  Or if I wanted to be frugal I could buy James Bond's Aston Martin DB9 with all the options.

For someone lazy, how much is it? Also does that include upkeep and insurance?

RyanAtTanagra

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10735 on: October 08, 2015, 11:04:18 AM »
If I wasn't saving for retirement a financed McLaren or Lamborghini would not be mathematically out of reach...

Well now I'm curious.  I had to figure out the total loan amount that equaled monthly payments of my current savings rate, at 3% interest.  Then went here:

http://www.thecarconnection.com/price/new,price-range-85000-1420000_by-price

and kept clicking till I got to that number.  I could be driving a 2015 Ferrari 458 Italia (no options).  Or if I wanted to be frugal I could buy James Bond's Aston Martin DB9 with all the options.

For someone lazy, how much is it? Also does that include upkeep and insurance?

The Ferrari was $240-250k.  The DB9 comes in at a cheap starting $188k and ends at I think $213k with all the options.

No that's just purchase price why on earth would I want to think about ongoing costs?!

MgoSam

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10736 on: October 08, 2015, 11:06:58 AM »
If I wasn't saving for retirement a financed McLaren or Lamborghini would not be mathematically out of reach...

Well now I'm curious.  I had to figure out the total loan amount that equaled monthly payments of my current savings rate, at 3% interest.  Then went here:

http://www.thecarconnection.com/price/new,price-range-85000-1420000_by-price

and kept clicking till I got to that number.  I could be driving a 2015 Ferrari 458 Italia (no options).  Or if I wanted to be frugal I could buy James Bond's Aston Martin DB9 with all the options.

For someone lazy, how much is it? Also does that include upkeep and insurance?

The Ferrari was $240-250k.  The DB9 comes in at a cheap starting $188k and ends at I think $213k with all the options.

No that's just purchase price why on earth would I want to think about ongoing costs?!

I've never had a car payment, what would the DB9 with options, $213k, cost if it were finances at like 3%?

solon

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10737 on: October 08, 2015, 11:16:00 AM »
If I wasn't saving for retirement a financed McLaren or Lamborghini would not be mathematically out of reach...

Well now I'm curious.  I had to figure out the total loan amount that equaled monthly payments of my current savings rate, at 3% interest.  Then went here:

http://www.thecarconnection.com/price/new,price-range-85000-1420000_by-price

and kept clicking till I got to that number.  I could be driving a 2015 Ferrari 458 Italia (no options).  Or if I wanted to be frugal I could buy James Bond's Aston Martin DB9 with all the options.

For someone lazy, how much is it? Also does that include upkeep and insurance?

The Ferrari was $240-250k.  The DB9 comes in at a cheap starting $188k and ends at I think $213k with all the options.

No that's just purchase price why on earth would I want to think about ongoing costs?!

I've never had a car payment, what would the DB9 with options, $213k, cost if it were finances at like 3%?

Over 84 months, with nothing down, the monthly payment would be $2,814.43

That's a pretty nice car!

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10738 on: October 08, 2015, 11:20:41 AM »
Co-worker: As far as TVs go, I really believe you should just spend whatever makes you happy.  I have never yet heard someone say, "I wish I hadn't spent so much on my TV."

This was in the middle of a discussion about a 65inch 4k curved tv vs. the 55inch version.
I don't think the curved TVs are even all that nice.  It cuts down on the number of people you can invite over to watch a movie with you, since you can't fan out as much and still see the TV.  I don't own a TV at all, so maybe I'm mistaken, but that's my $0.02.

I think the curved TV actually makes it easier to see from the sides and that's the whole point of it being curved.

I was curious about all the talk so I checked out ArsTechnica's take. The curve actually makes it harder to see if you're sitting off to the sides. It's arguably better if you're sitting in the middle.

Yeah that's what I've heard. Curved TV's as they currently are, are great if you are sitting in that sweet spot, but otherwise largely not worth the additional costs. That said, as costs go down and technology and research go up, it's possible that they will make sense in the future.

Curved TV is a gimmicky way to get people to buy ANOTHER TV. Wow, look everybody - it's curved! Nothing more.

And then in 5 years they will improve lcd side-viewing quality and you'll have to upgrade to a newfangled "flat" screen

MrMoogle

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10739 on: October 08, 2015, 11:32:58 AM »
CRT's had a curve...

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10740 on: October 08, 2015, 11:39:38 AM »
CRT's had a curve...
I'm pretty sure they are talking about tv's that are so big that they have a concave curve.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10741 on: October 08, 2015, 12:07:08 PM »
Over 84 months, with nothing down, the monthly payment would be $2,814.43

That's a pretty nice car!

No new car with a payment over $300 for more than 4 years is a good car for a regular person.


HairyUpperLip

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10742 on: October 08, 2015, 12:56:11 PM »
If I wasn't saving for retirement a financed McLaren or Lamborghini would not be mathematically out of reach...

Well now I'm curious.  I had to figure out the total loan amount that equaled monthly payments of my current savings rate, at 3% interest.  Then went here:

http://www.thecarconnection.com/price/new,price-range-85000-1420000_by-price

and kept clicking till I got to that number.  I could be driving a 2015 Ferrari 458 Italia (no options).  Or if I wanted to be frugal I could buy James Bond's Aston Martin DB9 with all the options.

For someone lazy, how much is it? Also does that include upkeep and insurance?

The Ferrari was $240-250k.  The DB9 comes in at a cheap starting $188k and ends at I think $213k with all the options.

No that's just purchase price why on earth would I want to think about ongoing costs?!

I've never had a car payment, what would the DB9 with options, $213k, cost if it were finances at like 3%?

Over 84 months, with nothing down, the monthly payment would be $2,814.43

That's a pretty nice car!

MMM Group Buy DB9's?

I'm down. Only $2,714.43 a month with group buy discount guys!

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10743 on: October 08, 2015, 01:13:59 PM »
lol I just heard "I have no gas in my car and $10 in my wallet."

Not sure if srs..but payday is apparently tomorrow, so maybe it's true!

mtn

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10744 on: October 08, 2015, 01:20:20 PM »
lol I just heard "I have no gas in my car and $10 in my wallet."

Not sure if srs..but payday is apparently tomorrow, so maybe it's true!

I have no gas in my car, $2 dollars in my wallet, and payday isn't for another week!

But I also have a credit card with no balance and a debit card in my wallet.  So probably not an apples to apples conversation.

I'm a red panda

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10745 on: October 08, 2015, 01:42:24 PM »
CRT's had a curve...

That curve decreased the viewing experience. Curving the other way makes it "better".

Prairie Stash

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10746 on: October 08, 2015, 05:06:38 PM »
Textbooks make me angry. From a few years back when I took an economics class.

Prof (1st class): You are required to pay for online access to take quizzes for this class and see the online textbook
Me: (after class): I'm on student loans and don't have money for this
Prof: Then you'll fail the quizzes if you don't find the money
Me: University bylaw says profs can't force students to pay for any textbooks or online access (summary of me digging in)
Prof: That may be but surely you can come up with the money, maybe you can ask a friend for money? (summary of him being belligerent)
Me: No, I'm poor, again University bylaws prohibit this.
Prof: Fine, I'll get you special access for free

At my University there are requirements for all textbooks used by classes to be available (in very limited quantity) in the library, it paid off skimming the bylaws. I also aced his class, turns out I'm good with econ.

JLee

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10747 on: October 08, 2015, 05:53:12 PM »
Textbooks make me angry. From a few years back when I took an economics class.

Prof (1st class): You are required to pay for online access to take quizzes for this class and see the online textbook
Me: (after class): I'm on student loans and don't have money for this
Prof: Then you'll fail the quizzes if you don't find the money
Me: University bylaw says profs can't force students to pay for any textbooks or online access (summary of me digging in)
Prof: That may be but surely you can come up with the money, maybe you can ask a friend for money? (summary of him being belligerent)
Me: No, I'm poor, again University bylaws prohibit this.
Prof: Fine, I'll get you special access for free

At my University there are requirements for all textbooks used by classes to be available (in very limited quantity) in the library, it paid off skimming the bylaws. I also aced his class, turns out I'm good with econ.

Heh that's awesome.

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10748 on: October 08, 2015, 06:08:01 PM »
I am looking for patio furniture and it's insane how much things cost. I'm more willing to put folding chairs until I find the right price, I'm not going to pay full retail just so it looks cool.

I inherited my grandparents' patio furniture. Its made of plain steel materials like square steel stock, round steel rod, and steel mesh. There was once a patio table and four chairs in the set as I recall but they were sold in a garage sale along the way I guess as they downsized.

This furniture is from the 1970s and lasts forever - at least until your ten year old boy starts using it for vaulting. Even so a quick zap with our MIG welder mended it without a hint of a repair.

Needs a paint job next year. Original paint since the 1970s!

(I'm a buy it once kind of guy. Don't mind change occasionally but I don't like the expense of the buy and replace cycle that cheap things from discount stores leads to.)
You should not use welding equipment on children

Dollar Slice

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Re: Overheard at Work
« Reply #10749 on: October 08, 2015, 06:23:26 PM »
You should not use welding equipment on children
Oh, that's just an old wives' tale. People weld children all the time where I'm from... just wear earplugs to dampen the screaming and it's fine.