Author Topic: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition  (Read 636352 times)

TomTX

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1250 on: May 17, 2019, 04:49:12 AM »
And in the car country of the world, USA, roughly the same number of people die from gun accidents as car accidents. (30K)
In Germany there are roughly 800 death by guns per year - 90% of them suicides.

While you have a strong overall overall point, your "gun accidents" number for the USA includes all gun fatalities, most of which are intentional. Unfortunately.

talltexan

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1251 on: May 17, 2019, 07:33:01 AM »
I think with traveling to a place, people naturally feel more cautious because you make all of these arrangements--place to stay, transportation, etc.--remotely, so it's harder to change course if you arrive there and feel very unsafe.

Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places. And not having the standing of citizenship as we do here.

Finally, when you travel abroad, you stick out as an American. You just do. Different clothes, hair style, behavior. Germany was mentioned in other posts, and I promise the Germans will figure out quickly that you...aren't.

shelivesthedream

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1252 on: May 17, 2019, 08:27:34 AM »
I think with traveling to a place, people naturally feel more cautious because you make all of these arrangements--place to stay, transportation, etc.--remotely, so it's harder to change course if you arrive there and feel very unsafe.

Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places. And not having the standing of citizenship as we do here.

Finally, when you travel abroad, you stick out as an American. You just do. Different clothes, hair style, behavior. Germany was mentioned in other posts, and I promise the Germans will figure out quickly that you...aren't.

Yeeeeeesss... but... the world is a big place. I would feel pretty unsafe going to Syria. But I think Germans would be pretty surprised if they were told the rule of law isn't as strong there as in America. The Germans would absolutely figure out (probably before you opened your mouth) that you were American and then... what? Shoot you? Seriously, I think Germany is probably one of the safest countries in the world. Is it because they speak a foreign language? (Discounting the fact that many Germans do actually speak excellent English). The UK is pretty safe too - also safer, on average, than America.

Absolutely, some places in the world are not very safe - including extremely unsafe for certain classes of people. But one can't just lump it into "America" and "the entire world" and decide it's not safe to go to Germany just because somewhere else has a civil war on.

talltexan

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1253 on: May 17, 2019, 12:16:34 PM »
It's fair to pick on Germany from my earlier comment. You are more correct than I.

Other countries mentioned in these posts included Honduras, Mexico, India,...

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1254 on: May 17, 2019, 03:01:55 PM »
I think with traveling to a place, people naturally feel more cautious because you make all of these arrangements--place to stay, transportation, etc.--remotely, so it's harder to change course if you arrive there and feel very unsafe.

Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places. And not having the standing of citizenship as we do here.

Finally, when you travel abroad, you stick out as an American. You just do. Different clothes, hair style, behavior. Germany was mentioned in other posts, and I promise the Germans will figure out quickly that you...aren't.

I agree with this.  The question isn't really if a country/destination is merely "safe" it's whether it's safe for tourists.  I've travelled to supposedly unsafe South American countries with absolutely no problems because I traveled with locals.  The most unsafe I've felt abroad was Paris when a large group of those "free rope bracelet" guys grabbed my wrist and I had to verbally hulk out on them.  Another guy pretended to be a stranded Canadian and asked for money.  But I bet my experiences would be the exact opposite if I had known someone in Paris and had been traveling to South America alone.

« Last Edit: May 17, 2019, 03:04:48 PM by dragoncar »

markbike528CBX

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1255 on: May 17, 2019, 07:13:06 PM »
I think with traveling to a place, people naturally feel more cautious because you make all of these arrangements--place to stay, transportation, etc.--remotely, so it's harder to change course if you arrive there and feel very unsafe.

Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places. And not having the standing of citizenship as we do here.

Finally, when you travel abroad, you stick out as an American. You just do. Different clothes, hair style, behavior. Germany was mentioned in other posts, and I promise the Germans will figure out quickly that you...aren't.

I agree with this.  The question isn't really if a country/destination is merely "safe" it's whether it's safe for tourists.  I've travelled to supposedly unsafe South American countries with absolutely no problems because I traveled with locals.  The most unsafe I've felt abroad was Paris when a large group of those "free rope bracelet" guys grabbed my wrist and I had to verbally hulk out on them.  Another guy pretended to be a stranded Canadian and asked for money.  But I bet my experiences would be the exact opposite if I had known someone in Paris and had been traveling to South America alone.

TL;DR .... American = sneakers, European = much nicer shoes.
I think the most shocked I've been is when a German grocery checkout clerk loudly castigated me for having 2L pop bottles vertical on the conveyor belt.  I still have PTSD when I buy 2L pop bottles :-)
Especially in bigger cities I've often been welcomed or spoken to in English right as I walked in the door. 

On the other hand, I apparently was mistaken for a local in Moscow, even though I had a very famous company logo on my work vest. 
I guess no one thought that any tourist would be wearing a vest and short sleeve shirt in Moscow in March.

I've worked many places in the world and I've walked places/times that I would not have considered in most US cities.  Maybe ignorance is/was bliss, but it worked. 

Linea_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1256 on: May 27, 2019, 11:18:01 PM »
Not a typical anti-anti-Mustachian story, but I think it sorts of fits here anyway.

Today I received an email from a colleague who told all of us that he will quit his job per 1rst of August (we have a 3 month notice period). He is currently a Java programmer. He will start working as a personal trainer at a fitness studio. Physically his body doesn't look like the typical personal trainer. He also wrote that we soon could stop making jokes about that, because he would also start working in his own consultancy company.

He is currently a father of 2 children. In his younger years, he used to live as a ski bum for half the year and programming/earning money in the other half of the year. I heard him say earlier that that life is no longer an option. But obviously, working as a consultant for himself is now possible. I think he is taking the personal trainer job as a transition job until he gets enough consultancy work.

It sounds like an interesting career change. I'm looking forward to asking him some questions about his motivation and his plans.

RelaxedGal

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1257 on: June 03, 2019, 09:10:15 AM »
I'm always pleasantly surprised by the number of people I run into who cut their own hair.  At least two of my coworkers - one guy with a ponytail who just trims the end off, the other used clippers from Costco a la Mr Money Mustache.  I think a couple of other guys shave their heads - a slightly different skill set but less intimidating for many.  I wear mine shoulder length and use a half dozen or so tiny rubberbands to get the line straight, when I posted this on Facebook a cousin chimed in that she uses the ponytail method to get a nice layered effect.

Just Joe

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1258 on: June 03, 2019, 03:32:58 PM »
I'm pretty sure I'd do a hack job if I tried to cut my own hair. I have asked DW to cut it every now and then and she does a fine job. What I mostly do is just cut it twice per year at the barber's. Yes, it takes a relaxed employer to allow me to grow my hair out that fair.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1259 on: June 03, 2019, 05:36:21 PM »
I'm pretty sure I'd do a hack job if I tried to cut my own hair. I have asked DW to cut it every now and then and she does a fine job. What I mostly do is just cut it twice per year at the barber's. Yes, it takes a relaxed employer to allow me to grow my hair out that fair.

It really depends on your style.  I'm fine with doing #4 on the sides and working up to a #8 on top.  It's a short, manageable haircut that isn't much different from what I'd pay around $15 for at a barber.  If I needed it longer on top, I would probably also hack it up.

Threshkin

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1260 on: June 03, 2019, 07:36:39 PM »
I'm pretty sure I'd do a hack job if I tried to cut my own hair. I have asked DW to cut it every now and then and she does a fine job. What I mostly do is just cut it twice per year at the barber's. Yes, it takes a relaxed employer to allow me to grow my hair out that fair.

It really depends on your style.  I'm fine with doing #4 on the sides and working up to a #8 on top.  It's a short, manageable haircut that isn't much different from what I'd pay around $15 for at a barber.  If I needed it longer on top, I would probably also hack it up.

I am down to #2 on the sides and 4 on the top.  That way I can go 4 to 6 months before getting another cut.

Alfred J Quack

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1261 on: June 03, 2019, 11:33:40 PM »
I'm pretty sure I'd do a hack job if I tried to cut my own hair. I have asked DW to cut it every now and then and she does a fine job. What I mostly do is just cut it twice per year at the barber's. Yes, it takes a relaxed employer to allow me to grow my hair out that fair.

It really depends on your style.  I'm fine with doing #4 on the sides and working up to a #8 on top.  It's a short, manageable haircut that isn't much different from what I'd pay around $15 for at a barber.  If I needed it longer on top, I would probably also hack it up.

I am down to #2 on the sides and 4 on the top.  That way I can go 4 to 6 months before getting another cut.

I'm going bald on top and 3mm on the side. I'm in the comb-over zone, if I let it grow too long, I get witty comments about being afraid of letting go of my hair.
I don't give a hoot though, I just trim it all to 3mm with my own electric cutters. At the shortest length I keep being surprised by the spot at the top, it's still hanging on by too few hairs ;)

Dicey

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1262 on: June 04, 2019, 12:17:59 AM »
Since we're on the subject of cutting hair, I just cut my MILs hair for the second time ever. What's different this time around is that I splurged on a new pair of scissors. My neighbor at the flip house owns a sharpening business, so I told him what I wanted and bought what he recommended. They are amazing! I decided to really go to town on MIL's hair and it turned out great. It helps that she has lovely silver curls. Curls hide a lot, thankfully.

You have to have humor to survive caretaking a person with ALZ. We regularly ask MIL questions we know the answers to, just to see what she comes up for a response. At the dinner table a few nights later, I told her her haircut looks really nice (shockingly, it does). I asked her who cut her hair. She thought about it and said, "Oh, a professional." DH and I damn near fell off our chairs. Worth the price of the new shears right there.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1263 on: June 04, 2019, 01:11:35 AM »
Since we're on the subject of cutting hair, I just cut my MILs hair for the second time ever. What's different this time around is that I splurged on a new pair of scissors. My neighbor at the flip house owns a sharpening business, so I told him what I wanted and bought what he recommended. They are amazing! I decided to really go to town on MIL's hair and it turned out great. It helps that she has lovely silver curls. Curls hide a lot, thankfully.

You have to have humor to survive caretaking a person with ALZ. We regularly ask MIL questions we know the answers to, just to see what she comes up for a response. At the dinner table a few nights later, I told her her haircut looks really nice (shockingly, it does). I asked her who cut her hair. She thought about it and said, "Oh, a professional." DH and I damn near fell off our chairs. Worth the price of the new shears right there.

Indeed, good scissors make a big difference. Last time we bought hair cutting scissors, we ordered from China, but the most expensive ones we found. They are nice and sharp.

From my former hairdresser, I learned that professional scissors cost a small fortune, not the kind of investment you would normally do as a private person.

jinga nation

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1264 on: June 04, 2019, 07:06:27 AM »
I'm pretty sure I'd do a hack job if I tried to cut my own hair. I have asked DW to cut it every now and then and she does a fine job. What I mostly do is just cut it twice per year at the barber's. Yes, it takes a relaxed employer to allow me to grow my hair out that fair.

It really depends on your style.  I'm fine with doing #4 on the sides and working up to a #8 on top.  It's a short, manageable haircut that isn't much different from what I'd pay around $15 for at a barber.  If I needed it longer on top, I would probably also hack it up.

I am down to #2 on the sides and 4 on the top.  That way I can go 4 to 6 months before getting another cut.

I'm going bald on top and 3mm on the side. I'm in the comb-over zone, if I let it grow too long, I get witty comments about being afraid of letting go of my hair.
I don't give a hoot though, I just trim it all to 3mm with my own electric cutters. At the shortest length I keep being surprised by the spot at the top, it's still hanging on by too few hairs ;)

I used to do that, wife would complain it's too long. So now am at 1/2 on sides, and #2 on top (literally, a shithead. LOL)

Used to cut my own hair, but hated cleaning up, and wasn't professionally clean at the back - my bad hand-eye coordination with the left hand. Easier to pay a few bucks and no cleaning up required. $6/7 haircut coupons FTW!

It works perfect for the hot weather down here in 'Merica's Dong-a-Lago.

My wife bought a pair of professional scissors and started cutting the kids' hair in the backyard after watching some YouTube tutorial videos.

SwordGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1265 on: June 04, 2019, 07:20:31 AM »
From my former hairdresser, I learned that professional scissors cost a small fortune, not the kind of investment you would normally do as a private person.

You must people who do a lot of sewing.

Not only will they buy great scissors but they will maim you if you use them for anything else.

partgypsy

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1266 on: June 04, 2019, 08:42:15 AM »
If my sister lived down here I would have her exclusively cut my hair and color it, she does a really good job. She is self taught from doing her own hair. The other thing I would have my sister do, is do my yard. She used to work for a plant nursery and also used to take care of my Mom's yard and just does a good job. We are twins and while my sister and my Dad have green thumbs, I'm this close to hopeless. I think it's while I enjoy seeing plants grow, I don't enjoy working in the yard, take short cuts, forget, etc, while she actually seems to enjoy it. ps cutting my own hair is not an option. It is stick straight and even some pros have a hard time with it.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2019, 03:33:39 PM by partgypsy »

Dicey

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1267 on: June 04, 2019, 09:05:12 AM »
From my former hairdresser, I learned that professional scissors cost a small fortune, not the kind of investment you would normally do as a private person.

You must people who do a lot of sewing.

Not only will they buy great scissors but they will maim you if you use them for anything else.
Funny, the sharpening guy said that was a myth. Scissors get dull based on use. If you have designated sewing scissors, the get very little use typically, so they stay sharp.

Raenia

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1268 on: June 04, 2019, 09:35:00 AM »
From my former hairdresser, I learned that professional scissors cost a small fortune, not the kind of investment you would normally do as a private person.

You must people who do a lot of sewing.

Not only will they buy great scissors but they will maim you if you use them for anything else.
Funny, the sharpening guy said that was a myth. Scissors get dull based on use. If you have designated sewing scissors, the get very little use typically, so they stay sharp.

Right, that's exactly why I'd be upset if someone was using my nice sharp sewing scissors to cut up their old credit cards - they are dulling my good scissors, when we have a perfectly functional cheap pair for that sort of thing.  Then I'll have to pay to have them sharpened, vs with the crappy pair just living with it because they don't need to be sharp.

Dicey

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1269 on: June 04, 2019, 11:08:29 AM »
From my former hairdresser, I learned that professional scissors cost a small fortune, not the kind of investment you would normally do as a private person.

You must people who do a lot of sewing.

Not only will they buy great scissors but they will maim you if you use them for anything else.
Funny, the sharpening guy said that was a myth. Scissors get dull based on use. If you have designated sewing scissors, the get very little use typically, so they stay sharp.

Right, that's exactly why I'd be upset if someone was using my nice sharp sewing scissors to cut up their old credit cards - they are dulling my good scissors, when we have a perfectly functional cheap pair for that sort of thing.  Then I'll have to pay to have them sharpened, vs with the crappy pair just living with it because they don't need to be sharp.
Yup.

Raenia

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1270 on: June 04, 2019, 12:13:22 PM »
From my former hairdresser, I learned that professional scissors cost a small fortune, not the kind of investment you would normally do as a private person.

You must people who do a lot of sewing.

Not only will they buy great scissors but they will maim you if you use them for anything else.
Funny, the sharpening guy said that was a myth. Scissors get dull based on use. If you have designated sewing scissors, the get very little use typically, so they stay sharp.

Right, that's exactly why I'd be upset if someone was using my nice sharp sewing scissors to cut up their old credit cards - they are dulling my good scissors, when we have a perfectly functional cheap pair for that sort of thing.  Then I'll have to pay to have them sharpened, vs with the crappy pair just living with it because they don't need to be sharp.
Yup.

So what is the myth?  That the sewer will maim the mis-user?

zolotiyeruki

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1271 on: June 04, 2019, 01:55:50 PM »
So what is the myth?  That the sewer will maim the mis-user?
Oh, I don't think it's a myth.  My mother was pretty serious about sewing scissors only being used for fabric.

Heh, I originally misread your comment as a reference to wastewater, not to sewing :P

Zaga

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1272 on: June 04, 2019, 05:37:01 PM »
So what is the myth?  That the sewer will maim the mis-user?
Oh, I don't think it's a myth.  My mother was pretty serious about sewing scissors only being used for fabric.

Heh, I originally misread your comment as a reference to wastewater, not to sewing :P
https://me.me/i/eeabric-cutting-tools-donot-use-on-anything-but-fabric-ori-4935009

Sibley

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1273 on: June 10, 2019, 10:26:45 AM »
From my former hairdresser, I learned that professional scissors cost a small fortune, not the kind of investment you would normally do as a private person.

You must people who do a lot of sewing.

Not only will they buy great scissors but they will maim you if you use them for anything else.
Funny, the sharpening guy said that was a myth. Scissors get dull based on use. If you have designated sewing scissors, the get very little use typically, so they stay sharp.

Right, that's exactly why I'd be upset if someone was using my nice sharp sewing scissors to cut up their old credit cards - they are dulling my good scissors, when we have a perfectly functional cheap pair for that sort of thing.  Then I'll have to pay to have them sharpened, vs with the crappy pair just living with it because they don't need to be sharp.
Yup.

So what is the myth?  That the sewer will maim the mis-user?

No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1274 on: June 10, 2019, 02:58:54 PM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.

Dicey

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1275 on: June 10, 2019, 08:04:34 PM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.
I love you, dc! You made me really, really laugh. Thanks.

Sibley

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1276 on: June 11, 2019, 07:37:48 AM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.

Of course! Never any question about that. I'd hit bone which would probably mess up your chef knife.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1277 on: June 11, 2019, 02:59:31 PM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.

Of course! Never any question about that. I'd hit bone which would probably mess up your chef knife.

With proper technique, a boning knife would be acceotable

Wintergreen78

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1278 on: June 13, 2019, 02:22:22 PM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.

Of course! Never any question about that. I'd hit bone which would probably mess up your chef knife.

With proper technique, a boning knife would be acceotable

Really, a true mustachian would learn how to sharpen their own scissors and knives. Then you can stab anyone you want with the nearest tool and sharpen it when you are done.

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1279 on: June 13, 2019, 09:06:50 PM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.

Of course! Never any question about that. I'd hit bone which would probably mess up your chef knife.

With proper technique, a boning knife would be acceotable

Really, a true mustachian would learn how to sharpen their own scissors and knives. Then you can stab anyone you want with the nearest tool and sharpen it when you are done.

Cutting used tin foil can improve the edge on dull scissors.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1280 on: June 14, 2019, 12:41:00 AM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.

Of course! Never any question about that. I'd hit bone which would probably mess up your chef knife.

With proper technique, a boning knife would be acceotable

Really, a true mustachian would learn how to sharpen their own scissors and knives. Then you can stab anyone you want with the nearest tool and sharpen it when you are done.

Cutting used tin foil can improve the edge on dull scissors.

Does cutting the flesh of the damned have any positive effects on dull scissors?

Alfred J Quack

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1281 on: June 14, 2019, 05:09:11 AM »
Quote from: Sibley link=topic=20586.msg2392107#msg2392107


No myth. You use my needlepoint scissors for ANYTHING other than their intended use, and I will stab you.

But Only with the designated stabbing knife.  Donít you dare use my chef knife.

Of course! Never any question about that. I'd hit bone which would probably mess up your chef knife.

With proper technique, a boning knife would be acceotable

Really, a true mustachian would learn how to sharpen their own scissors and knives. Then you can stab anyone you want with the nearest tool and sharpen it when you are done.

Cutting used tin foil can improve the edge on dull scissors.

Does cutting the flesh of the damned have any positive effects on dull scissors?
No, because of the corrosive effect of oils and acids in the body. Best to sharpen it beforehand.

Slow&Steady

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1282 on: June 21, 2019, 02:27:50 PM »
Today, a coworker invited me to go with her to a hip new ice cream shop that just opened up.

They were selling tiny little popsicles with custom toppings for $5.50 each.

My coworker and I had an awkward little interaction where I told her I wasn't going to get anything. I didn't want to seem snooty by telling here there was no way I blowing $5.50 on a popsicle, that I thought it was a ridiculous waste of money. So I acted like none of the popsicles interested me, which only made her ask me many questions about what flavors I liked in order to try to find me a suitable popsicle.

Needless to say, after an awkward exchange, we left without me getting a popsicle. (She got one, though.)

Then we stopped by a boutique, where my coworker selected several handmade items for purchase, spending $50, while I walked around the store, killing time.

This is a coworker who couldn't afford to attend her own out-of-state graduation (she did her degree online) a month ago.

Wrong thread... you are looking for the normal Overheard at Work thread, not the Anti-Antimustachian thread.

Linea_Norway

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1283 on: June 26, 2019, 04:25:13 AM »
One of my younger co.workers told is during lunch that had he his car full of parts. He had booked the mechanic boot at work for the whole evening and he will try to change his brakes and do a lot of other stuff himself. It will be the first time he tries this and he has studied youtube. I hope he will succeed. New life skill.

Imma

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1284 on: June 27, 2019, 04:17:08 AM »
It's great that your employer allows you to use their facilities @Linea_Norway ! Wish we had something like that.

Alfred J Quack

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1285 on: July 03, 2019, 01:23:33 AM »
It's great that your employer allows you to use their facilities @Linea_Norway ! Wish we had something like that.

There are some garages where you can rent workspace to tinker with your car. A quick Google reveals that there is one close to me for Ä12 an hour, or Ä15 if you also want to use their tools.

BFive55

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1286 on: July 03, 2019, 05:11:34 AM »
Someone at work is thinking of getting a new car to replace their very old beater. One guy suggested a truck with a full cab. I interjected and said if you get a truck with a full cab then think about it first: what do you haul, why do you need it? The guy was receptive to that line of thinking. I then told him if he gets a truck all his non-truck owning friends will just pester him to borrow it, lol.

I'm one of those people who pester truck owning friends to borrow one. What's kind of ironic is that one friend who has a truck has helped me haul stuff more than he has used it for himself, lol.

A Fella from Stella

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1287 on: July 03, 2019, 07:02:47 AM »
Co-worker thinking of borrowing from 401(k) to pay off house, then pay himself back.

Maybe it's a market timing thing. Maybe he just hates the payment that much.

Fae

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1288 on: July 03, 2019, 09:53:29 AM »
Co-worker thinking of borrowing from 401(k) to pay off house, then pay himself back.

Maybe it's a market timing thing. Maybe he just hates the payment that much.

Depending on his interest rate, this is either really smart or really moronic. Do you know if he bought before the housing bubble burst when interest rates were ridiculous?

Dicey

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1289 on: July 03, 2019, 10:10:58 AM »
Co-worker thinking of borrowing from 401(k) to pay off house, then pay himself back.

Maybe it's a market timing thing. Maybe he just hates the payment that much.

Depending on his interest rate, this is either really smart or really moronic. Do you know if he bought before the housing bubble burst when interest rates were ridiculous?
Does he understand that he will most likely be unable to switch jobs unless and until he replays the 401k loan? I had one for nine months, for better reasons than his, and I hated every minute of it.

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1290 on: July 06, 2019, 01:26:12 PM »
Co-worker thinking of borrowing from 401(k) to pay off house, then pay himself back.

Maybe it's a market timing thing. Maybe he just hates the payment that much.

Depending on his interest rate, this is either really smart or really moronic. Do you know if he bought before the housing bubble burst when interest rates were ridiculous?
Does he understand that he will most likely be unable to switch jobs unless and until he replays the 401k loan? I had one for nine months, for better reasons than his, and I hated every minute of it.

Depends on the plan and employer. The Boy did not have to pay off his 401(K) loan before resigning.

LilyFleur

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1291 on: July 06, 2019, 02:42:58 PM »
I think with traveling to a place, people naturally feel more cautious because you make all of these arrangements--place to stay, transportation, etc.--remotely, so it's harder to change course if you arrive there and feel very unsafe.

Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places. And not having the standing of citizenship as we do here.

Finally, when you travel abroad, you stick out as an American. You just do. Different clothes, hair style, behavior. Germany was mentioned in other posts, and I promise the Germans will figure out quickly that you...aren't.

You stick out more as an American if you are overweight and wear big white running shoes. I traveled with a boyfriend who:  a. was not overweight; b. wore black tennis shoes; and c. spoke French fluently. The French thought he was a native.

ender

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1292 on: July 06, 2019, 03:07:55 PM »
Does he understand that he will most likely be unable to switch jobs unless and until he replays the 401k loan? I had one for nine months, for better reasons than his, and I hated every minute of it.

The rules on this changed slightly. Now, you have until the next tax return you file to repay it.

SwordGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1293 on: July 06, 2019, 03:09:13 PM »
Finally, when you travel abroad, you stick out as an American. You just do. Different clothes, hair style, behavior. Germany was mentioned in other posts, and I promise the Germans will figure out quickly that you...aren't.

It just depends on the person.

Me?  Anyone within sight of me will say, "He's an American."  Won't give it a moment's thought.

My wife?   She blends into whatever culture she's in.  The Germans thought she was German.   The Turks thought she was Turkish.   The Russians in Kazakhstan thought she was Russian.  Ethiopians thought she was Ethiopian until she got within about 10 feet of them.   Was fun to watch their eyes bug out with a "Where did that white woman come from?" expression on their face!   She got off the plane after 6 weeks in China and *I* thought she was Chinese.




SwordGuy

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1294 on: July 06, 2019, 03:14:49 PM »
I think with traveling to a place, people naturally feel more cautious because you make all of these arrangements--place to stay, transportation, etc.--remotely, so it's harder to change course if you arrive there and feel very unsafe.
@talltexan , exactly how is that different from me going on Travelocity and making travel arrangements for here in the USA?

Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places.
I'm a Mustachian.  **I've** got money.  Bribes can be a really convenient way of making problems go away.

And not having the standing of citizenship as we do here.
That may actually be an advantage.  Americans bring money into the economy and they stop coming if Americans get hurt or inconvenienced.   Ever pay attention to how other countries treat their own citizens?
Now, I wouldn't recommend some countries for Americans to go to -- but for most of them I wouldn't recommend anyone be there.

I think the fears are overblown.

LilyFleur

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1295 on: July 06, 2019, 06:17:41 PM »
I think with traveling to a place, people naturally feel more cautious because you make all of these arrangements--place to stay, transportation, etc.--remotely, so it's harder to change course if you arrive there and feel very unsafe.
@talltexan , exactly how is that different from me going on Travelocity and making travel arrangements for here in the USA?

Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places.
I'm a Mustachian.  **I've** got money.  Bribes can be a really convenient way of making problems go away.

And not having the standing of citizenship as we do here.
That may actually be an advantage.  Americans bring money into the economy and they stop coming if Americans get hurt or inconvenienced.   Ever pay attention to how other countries treat their own citizens?
Now, I wouldn't recommend some countries for Americans to go to -- but for most of them I wouldn't recommend anyone be there.

I think the fears are overblown.

I agree, and it leads to lost opportunities. My mom had discussed taking me and my children on a river cruise from Paris to Normandy.  It would have been perfect, as my father was beginning to have trouble with much walking, and my mother and the kids and I could have explored at the various stops along the way. My mom had a lot of fear (she watched a lot of cable TV news) about certain minorities/crime/terrorism in France. We did not go.

Fast forward nine years. My father died, and my mother died.  I took my college-age children to Europe two summers in a row. We were smart about where we stayed (the Airbnb reviews generally cover neighborhood safety in the comments section), and we were careful not to get pick pocketed. What amazing experiences we had, traveling together! We were all perfectly safe, and travel is a very broadening, educational experience. But it is not for everyone, and if you are afraid of it, and it makes you nervous, it is not for you. I have also enjoyed the British countryside through my 65-inch TV watching BBC shows from my living room!

Taran Wanderer

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1296 on: July 09, 2019, 08:35:39 PM »
Why would people worry about safety in Europe?  Everywhere I have been, I have felt safer than most cities in the USA, and probably even safer than where I live in small-town-USA. Be intelligent and keep your wits about you, of course.  We just took our grade school kids to Europe and had a blast.

flipboard

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1297 on: July 09, 2019, 11:44:32 PM »
Why would people worry about safety in Europe?  Everywhere I have been, I have felt safer than most cities in the USA, and probably even safer than where I live in small-town-USA. Be intelligent and keep your wits about you, of course.  We just took our grade school kids to Europe and had a blast.
The statistics agree with you.

As someone who has lived in both, it's simply incomparable. That said, loud and oblivious tourists are easy pickings in the tourist hotspots (both in the US and Europe) just because they tend to be carrying more cash/documents/etc., and often aren't very aware of themselves or their surroundings. Be quiet, be aware, you generally won't have issues.

I know more people who have been mugged in the US than in Europe, and that's despite only spending 2 years in the US.

ender

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1298 on: July 13, 2019, 05:55:03 PM »
Quote from: SwordGuy link=topic=20586.msg2410391#msg2410391 date=1562447689[

[quote author=talltexan link=topic=20586.msg2375365#msg2375365 date=1558099981
Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places.
I'm a Mustachian.  **I've** got money.  Bribes can be a really convenient way of making problems go away.
[/quote]

I used to work with folks in Mexico/Brazil. We had an onsite and something they brought up when talking about cultural differences was that they loved how much people here obey the law.

I thought they were nuts. But in talking to them, they talked about how systemic corruption was within both countries - I was kind of surprised but their comments suddenly made a lot more sense in that context.

dragoncar

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Re: Overheard at Work: The Anti-Antimustachian Edition
« Reply #1299 on: July 13, 2019, 09:17:42 PM »
Also, the rule of law in other countries isn't as strong as we are used to in the US (I know, I know, you can see my opinions about Trump in other threads). But seriously, the culture of bribery, etc., is far more common in other places.


I used to work with folks in Mexico/Brazil. We had an onsite and something they brought up when talking about cultural differences was that they loved how much people here obey the law.

I thought they were nuts. But in talking to them, they talked about how systemic corruption was within both countries - I was kind of surprised but their comments suddenly made a lot more sense in that context.

Ugh, wife just studied for her citizenship quiz (she passed) and there was a question about ďwhat is the rule of law?Ē  Made me real embarrassed at our current situation... if anyone knows any scholarship on what makes counties more or less corrupt Iím very interested to read a good summary