Author Topic: NPR Long Haul Commuters Article  (Read 2069 times)

Nubs

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NPR Long Haul Commuters Article
« on: January 29, 2015, 08:44:34 AM »
It's frustrating for me to read things like this.  I just can't get my mind wrapped around the "aww shucks, the world is making it so hard and I have no control" culture.  I understand that things can get tough and many people have required commutes or bad situations, but when you design your life around a 100 mile commute in a gas guzzler or decide to spend your "extra" money from cheaper gas to splurge on unnecessary items instead of finding a way to make your life more efficient and invest in your future (or safety cushion) it is tough to have the sympathy that this article calls for. 
 
How do we change this culture and help people to stop shooting themselves in the foot?

http://www.npr.org/2015/01/29/382177536/for-long-haul-drivers-cheap-gas-means-a-sweeter-commute

GetItRight

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Re: NPR Long Haul Commuters Article
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2015, 09:25:36 AM »
"We" don't change anything if people want to shoot themselves in the foot. The only thing you can do is lead by example. For those commuting ~100 miles/day the difference in annual commute cost between current prices and previous high prices considering driving a 25 MPG vehicle is about $1800. Presumably the job is worth that (or more) between work environment and compensation. It may not be worth the extra time and money to you, but it clearly is to the person doing it, so there is nothing that needs to be changed.

While personally I don't view a 100+ mile commute as desirable I would absolutely do it for the right amount of money. When I consider a new job I have always crunched the numbers on job related expenses. That includes gas, tolls, public transit and additional taxes if applicable along with a subjective weight to the type of commute. If the work and environment seems good I weigh any additional expenses against the pay increase. It's pretty simple, and I'm sure everyone figures out the costs at least approximately to determine if it's a worthwhile opportunity. Others may do a 100 miles commute temporarily and plan to eventually move closer if it turns out to be good long term thing, or find something else if not. I did 150+ miles a day for months when gas prices were high. I didn't mind and the net pay after commute was better than what I could find locally. It was not something I'd have done for years though.

LucyBIT

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Nubs

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Re: NPR Long Haul Commuters Article
« Reply #3 on: January 29, 2015, 12:53:53 PM »
"You may also like: http://www.npr.org/2015/01/05/375201451/car-sales-surged-in-december-capping-a-good-year-for-the-industry"


Haha, yup.  I suppose my dream of a less car-centric society might have to wait a bit. 

dycker1978

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Re: NPR Long Haul Commuters Article
« Reply #4 on: January 29, 2015, 03:13:43 PM »

Their Chrysler 300 isn't a fuel-sipper, and they say they're saving about $40 a week from when gas prices were at their peak. Regina Wilson says now she can splurge on a pair of shoes for herself or buy presents for her grandchildren.

The savings are a big deal because the Wilsons don't have cash to spare. Lawrence Wilson says he's been shoveling snow for the local housing authority and doing the occasional restaurant job; Regina used to be a home health aide until she got sick. Now she drives to the doctor nearly 20 miles away three times a week.



Yup... that is where the savings should go... gifts and shoe... not into savings so they do no have to struggle so much