Author Topic: No, I won't buy into your MLM  (Read 342339 times)

sparkytheop

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 853
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1250 on: August 08, 2019, 03:15:26 PM »
Real businesses try to avoid over-saturation.  They don't flood their local market by recruiting people to do the exact same job they do, selling the exact same stuff they do, in the exact same location they do, for the exact same actual CEO.  They (usually) want every business to be able to succeed in every location.  They don't build a bunch of the same stores on the same street and spout on about how this one store is succeeding, so yours can too, while ignoring the fact that all the other stores on that street are failing, and giving the succeeding store most of their profits, is the only real reason the star store is doing well.

That's also a key thing to look for in terms of franchise businesses, if you're ever in the market for one as part of a FI strategy. One of the guarantees that a franchise owner gets is that he or she will be the only franchisee within a specific radius. This introduces a "cost to exchange" that deters the customer from deciding to shop at another location instead. The better the franchise, the wider the radius. Subway, for example, is notorious for allowing new franchisees to set up shop close enough to an existing franchise to interfere with the first franchisee's business. Of course even a sizable exclusivity radius in a franchise agreement doesn't mean someone else won't build a nearly-identical business next door. I do see that some retail and commercial landlords try to take it into account... mall food courts come to mind. But the MLM model of sales, with people recruiting their own competition, flies right in the face of the non-compete principle.

Franchises definitely came to mind while writing that post, and some are very much better than others about making sure an area isn't over-saturated.

I remember reading about when Lularoe had a map of distributors.  It was only supposed to be looked at by customers (to see if they could do a return or exchange, stuff like that).  Current sellers and potential recruits were "forbidden" to look at the map.  When some of them did, they realized that they were completely surrounded by others in LLR.  LLR tried to say that there were still customers for everyone because each fabric was a "limited print" and "all the business owners would have different stock", so over-saturation was "impossible".  I can't imagine opening "a business" and not being allowed to know how many other people in the local area had the exact same "business".

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2189
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1251 on: August 08, 2019, 03:59:54 PM »
Real businesses try to avoid over-saturation.  They don't flood their local market by recruiting people to do the exact same job they do, selling the exact same stuff they do, in the exact same location they do, for the exact same actual CEO.  They (usually) want every business to be able to succeed in every location.  They don't build a bunch of the same stores on the same street and spout on about how this one store is succeeding, so yours can too, while ignoring the fact that all the other stores on that street are failing, and giving the succeeding store most of their profits, is the only real reason the star store is doing well.

That's also a key thing to look for in terms of franchise businesses, if you're ever in the market for one as part of a FI strategy. One of the guarantees that a franchise owner gets is that he or she will be the only franchisee within a specific radius. This introduces a "cost to exchange" that deters the customer from deciding to shop at another location instead. The better the franchise, the wider the radius. Subway, for example, is notorious for allowing new franchisees to set up shop close enough to an existing franchise to interfere with the first franchisee's business. Of course even a sizable exclusivity radius in a franchise agreement doesn't mean someone else won't build a nearly-identical business next door. I do see that some retail and commercial landlords try to take it into account... mall food courts come to mind. But the MLM model of sales, with people recruiting their own competition, flies right in the face of the non-compete principle.

Franchises definitely came to mind while writing that post, and some are very much better than others about making sure an area isn't over-saturated.

I remember reading about when Lularoe had a map of distributors.  It was only supposed to be looked at by customers (to see if they could do a return or exchange, stuff like that).  Current sellers and potential recruits were "forbidden" to look at the map.  When some of them did, they realized that they were completely surrounded by others in LLR.  LLR tried to say that there were still customers for everyone because each fabric was a "limited print" and "all the business owners would have different stock", so over-saturation was "impossible".  I can't imagine opening "a business" and not being allowed to know how many other people in the local area had the exact same "business".

Indeed: that sort of thing makes my bullshit detector go straight to magenta alert. Every competent business plan I've ever seen or helped review or prepare contains some kind of analysis of potential competitors and market saturation. I can't imagine, say, approving a loan for a "business" owner whose business plan didn't include one. I definitely wouldn't buy shares or otherwise go into partnership with someone who wasn't savvy enough to assess the competition. For a company to deliberately recruit vendors and to require them to purchase a fairly expensive starting inventory while concealing the presence and location of internal competitors is pretty dishonest to my way of thinking: it deprives a prospective vendor of information he or she needs to know before committing money and effort. In fact I think that kind of concealment borders on fraud. Internal competitor location disclosure should be expected and even required.

Travis

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2602
  • Location: South Korea
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1252 on: August 09, 2019, 01:51:21 AM »


Quote
Why would you put blood, sweat and tears into training a distributor just to have that distributor now leave your group and go out capture market share from you using what you have given them.

We all need to fight back with all that is in us against government officials that have no idea how to build a viable group of distributors to move product and award the person who built it.


Poor thing, the person you convinced to join your sham by telling them they could be their own boss will now be their own boss.

After reading that quote a couple more times, it seems almost too sociopathic to be real.  They're not defending the business, they're defending the actual pyramid scheme aspect openly.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2019, 01:53:09 AM by Travis »

insufFIcientfunds

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 92
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1253 on: August 09, 2019, 05:26:25 AM »


Quote
Why would you put blood, sweat and tears into training a distributor just to have that distributor now leave your group and go out capture market share from you using what you have given them.

We all need to fight back with all that is in us against government officials that have no idea how to build a viable group of distributors to move product and award the person who built it.



Poor thing, the person you convinced to join your sham by telling them they could be their own boss will now be their own boss.

After reading that quote a couple more times, it seems almost too sociopathic to be real.  They're not defending the business, they're defending the actual pyramid scheme aspect openly.

At least in my area and the people I know who do the MLMs, they do it because of that *one* person or family who has done it, got into it a long time ago, and makes a fortune. It is always about "I am going to be like "Bob."

There's a guy who is an AdvoCare king....or at least sounds like he is not anymore because of Gment regulations, who EVERYONE wanted to be. Making money hand over fist.

Or the MK lady who had every pink Caddy (the two door coupe and the little SUV, among others) in her garage.

It's a mirage and people just do not want to work or save so they try these get rich quick things, then annoy everyone they know with it.

Anyone see the toothpaste things now??? Why would I buy toothpaste from some crazy person off FB???

cassafrass

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1254 on: August 09, 2019, 06:55:52 AM »
Last month my mom surprisingly struck up a conversation about CBD oil with a pothead friend of mine. My mom has always been very straitlaced about drugs so I was surprised to learn that she's interested in trying it to help with her depression and arthritis. My friend apparently has a cousin who sell some sort of MLM CBD oils and convinced my mom to try it.

While I definitely don't believe the medical claims of the CBD community and think the whole thing is a little fishy, I agreed to be the middleman and pass off the order to my mom. I was shocked when I got the tiny bottle and found out the price tag is $100!! For a mere month's supply! My eyes also rolled so far back in my head when I read the boast of "sonicated nanotechnology!!" on the label.

I'm a little disappointed in myself for not talking my mom out of getting it, but hopefully I can discourage her from getting another bottle.

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1255 on: August 09, 2019, 09:16:19 AM »
Last month my mom surprisingly struck up a conversation about CBD oil with a pothead friend of mine. My mom has always been very straitlaced about drugs so I was surprised to learn that she's interested in trying it to help with her depression and arthritis. My friend apparently has a cousin who sell some sort of MLM CBD oils and convinced my mom to try it.

While I definitely don't believe the medical claims of the CBD community and think the whole thing is a little fishy, I agreed to be the middleman and pass off the order to my mom. I was shocked when I got the tiny bottle and found out the price tag is $100!! For a mere month's supply! My eyes also rolled so far back in my head when I read the boast of "sonicated nanotechnology!!" on the label.

I'm a little disappointed in myself for not talking my mom out of getting it, but hopefully I can discourage her from getting another bottle.

If it's sonicated, you can't go wrong. Now, we just need to know what sonicate means.

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1256 on: August 09, 2019, 09:18:27 AM »
Remembering a story. At an old job the company VP was a dormant MLM-er. His brother was very successful in it, and he had tried it, but didn't turn it into anything, but was doing well for himself. Anyway, he must see some potential in me, so he starts talking about the opportunity, and I just play dumb, because the only other thing I can think to say is "do you have any sense of right and wrong?"

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1711
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1257 on: August 09, 2019, 11:13:14 AM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

If she really likes the oil, you can at least help her find it somewhere cheaper. There are loads of CBD oil companies these days, and surely not all of them are MLMs...

It's what I assumed it meant. Sonication is a pretty blunt tool. I'd be more interested in their purification protocols.

A quick Google search reveals that PureKana sells a 300-mg bottle of CBD oil (40 doses, recommended at 1Ė2 doses per day) for $54 directly to the consumer.

fredbear

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 114
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1258 on: August 10, 2019, 11:09:24 AM »
...For a company to deliberately recruit vendors and to require them to purchase a fairly expensive starting inventory while concealing the presence and location of internal competitors is pretty dishonest to my way of thinking: it deprives a prospective vendor of information he or she needs to know before committing money and effort....
I was thinking of buying a bed-and-breakfast in Moab, and asked to see the books.  The real estate agent looked nervous, and said, "The, uh, the seller, well, the seller won't show the books until you make an offer."
This would be a better anecdote if I had been quick-witted enough to say, "Senator, my offer is $1.  Get out the books."  Instead, I wandered around and took a desultory look at the guest register, leafing through.  The B&B was in favor with its guests, although Moab was in more favor; many nice things said.  But by doing a quick page-count by year of guest commentary, it was clear the business was on a steady, smooth decline.  "Both declinin' numbers at an even rate," steady as a moonshot countdown, too.  10, 9, 8 ... 4, 3....  I told the realtor the seller's condition was brainless as well as insulting, and we would move on. 

Travis

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2602
  • Location: South Korea
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1259 on: August 10, 2019, 05:43:12 PM »
For a company to deliberately recruit vendors and to require them to purchase a fairly expensive starting inventory while concealing the presence and location of internal competitors is pretty dishonest to my way of thinking: it deprives a prospective vendor of information he or she needs to know before committing money and effort. In fact I think that kind of concealment borders on fraud. Internal competitor location disclosure should be expected and even required.

It's almost as if once the seller buys the start-up inventory the organization doesn't care if they actually sell anything...

Alfred J Quack

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 311
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1260 on: August 11, 2019, 03:14:48 AM »
...For a company to deliberately recruit vendors and to require them to purchase a fairly expensive starting inventory while concealing the presence and location of internal competitors is pretty dishonest to my way of thinking: it deprives a prospective vendor of information he or she needs to know before committing money and effort....
I was thinking of buying a bed-and-breakfast in Moab, and asked to see the books.  The real estate agent looked nervous, and said, "The, uh, the seller, well, the seller won't show the books until you make an offer."
This would be a better anecdote if I had been quick-witted enough to say, "Senator, my offer is $1.  Get out the books."  Instead, I wandered around and took a desultory look at the guest register, leafing through.  The B&B was in favor with its guests, although Moab was in more favor; many nice things said.  But by doing a quick page-count by year of guest commentary, it was clear the business was on a steady, smooth decline.  "Both declinin' numbers at an even rate," steady as a moonshot countdown, too.  10, 9, 8 ... 4, 3....  I told the realtor the seller's condition was brainless as well as insulting, and we would move on.
Could it have been because the reviews moved to online platforms?

Had a similar encounter with a car salesman a long way back. We could only test-drive the car if we were serious about buying. As if I would want to test-drive a car I wasn't serious about.
No no, he said, I had to sign the purchase form and then could test drive. Had to leave my license behind so that he could get the paperwork in order (as in, put the car in my name). Walked away laughing out loud.

cassafrass

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1261 on: August 12, 2019, 06:26:37 AM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

merula

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1291
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1262 on: August 12, 2019, 07:05:11 AM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1711
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1263 on: August 12, 2019, 07:15:25 AM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

merula

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1291
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1264 on: August 12, 2019, 07:25:50 AM »
Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

Oh, interesting! I stand corrected. I didn't realize celiac could manifest with contact reactions. But then, my knowledge of it comes from my idiot of a brother with celiac who thinks that he'll be fine with the occasional beer or brownie.


OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1711
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1265 on: August 12, 2019, 08:12:07 AM »
Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

Oh, interesting! I stand corrected. I didn't realize celiac could manifest with contact reactions. But then, my knowledge of it comes from my idiot of a brother with celiac who thinks that he'll be fine with the occasional beer or brownie.

Ugh, those people are the worst. It makes it impossible for the rest of us to be taken seriously. Hopefully he doesn't end up with intestinal lymphoma or something equally awful.

rockstache

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5899
  • Age: 2015
  • Location: Northeast
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1266 on: August 13, 2019, 09:44:23 AM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

I've also seen it on vegetables. I'm sorry, but wtf?

geekette

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1883
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1267 on: August 13, 2019, 10:09:02 AM »

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

I've also seen it on vegetables. I'm sorry, but wtf?
I saw it on flatware in a restaurant.  Seemed odd, but whatevs.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6976
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1268 on: August 13, 2019, 12:28:16 PM »
Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

Oh, interesting! I stand corrected. I didn't realize celiac could manifest with contact reactions. But then, my knowledge of it comes from my idiot of a brother with celiac who thinks that he'll be fine with the occasional beer or brownie.

Ugh, those people are the worst. It makes it impossible for the rest of us to be taken seriously. Hopefully he doesn't end up with intestinal lymphoma or something equally awful.
I don't have celiac, but have friends who do and I have a gluten intolerance.  (I'm always careful to answer "preference not allergy" at restaurants so to not confuse people.)  A friend of mine has a mom who is celiac and she keeps eating pasta at parties!  She's in her 70s, and it's like she doesn't realize that just because SHE buys gluten free pasta and her daughter always makes it for her, it's NOT SAFE everywhere else.

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1711
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1269 on: August 13, 2019, 01:52:44 PM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

I've also seen it on vegetables. I'm sorry, but wtf?

Like canned tomatoes? I have to check any label on seasoned/stewed tomatoes (or any other kind of vegetable). Barley malt is a cheap seasoning agent that doesnít have to be identified beyond ďnatural flavorĒ because it isnít a major allergen. Ditto for frozen veg: I have to make sure thereís no seasoning added.

Itís ridiculous on plain raw, frozen, or canned veg, though.

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1711
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1270 on: August 13, 2019, 01:54:32 PM »
Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

Oh, interesting! I stand corrected. I didn't realize celiac could manifest with contact reactions. But then, my knowledge of it comes from my idiot of a brother with celiac who thinks that he'll be fine with the occasional beer or brownie.

Ugh, those people are the worst. It makes it impossible for the rest of us to be taken seriously. Hopefully he doesn't end up with intestinal lymphoma or something equally awful.
I don't have celiac, but have friends who do and I have a gluten intolerance.  (I'm always careful to answer "preference not allergy" at restaurants so to not confuse people.)  A friend of mine has a mom who is celiac and she keeps eating pasta at parties!  She's in her 70s, and it's like she doesn't realize that just because SHE buys gluten free pasta and her daughter always makes it for her, it's NOT SAFE everywhere else.

Oh, good lord. Does she ever wonder why she feels awful much of the time?

rockstache

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 5899
  • Age: 2015
  • Location: Northeast
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1271 on: August 13, 2019, 06:35:50 PM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

I've also seen it on vegetables. I'm sorry, but wtf?

Like canned tomatoes? I have to check any label on seasoned/stewed tomatoes (or any other kind of vegetable). Barley malt is a cheap seasoning agent that doesnít have to be identified beyond ďnatural flavorĒ because it isnít a major allergen. Ditto for frozen veg: I have to make sure thereís no seasoning added.

Itís ridiculous on plain raw, frozen, or canned veg, though.
No! I mean on a sign in the produce section! Silly.

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1711
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1272 on: August 13, 2019, 07:16:46 PM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

I've also seen it on vegetables. I'm sorry, but wtf?

Like canned tomatoes? I have to check any label on seasoned/stewed tomatoes (or any other kind of vegetable). Barley malt is a cheap seasoning agent that doesnít have to be identified beyond ďnatural flavorĒ because it isnít a major allergen. Ditto for frozen veg: I have to make sure thereís no seasoning added.

Itís ridiculous on plain raw, frozen, or canned veg, though.
No! I mean on a sign in the produce section! Silly.

Yeah, that is insanely dumb. And pointless.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6976
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1273 on: August 14, 2019, 11:34:36 AM »
Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

Oh, interesting! I stand corrected. I didn't realize celiac could manifest with contact reactions. But then, my knowledge of it comes from my idiot of a brother with celiac who thinks that he'll be fine with the occasional beer or brownie.

Ugh, those people are the worst. It makes it impossible for the rest of us to be taken seriously. Hopefully he doesn't end up with intestinal lymphoma or something equally awful.
I don't have celiac, but have friends who do and I have a gluten intolerance.  (I'm always careful to answer "preference not allergy" at restaurants so to not confuse people.)  A friend of mine has a mom who is celiac and she keeps eating pasta at parties!  She's in her 70s, and it's like she doesn't realize that just because SHE buys gluten free pasta and her daughter always makes it for her, it's NOT SAFE everywhere else.

Oh, good lord. Does she ever wonder why she feels awful much of the time?
Her daughter does try to remind her.

On the frozen veg, husband bought some frozen veg while we were on vacation.  When we got back to the flat, I painstakingly looked through the ingredients to try and translate from Danish...yep, regular soy sauce.

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1274 on: August 14, 2019, 11:40:37 AM »
MLM story: buddy of mine got into something with auto parts. When showing me the fuel additive, I looked it up online and he began to panic, telling me you couldn't trust the internet. When I found a site it said positive things, and there were comments of people saying, "hey, where can I get this stuff?".

I see now that it was probably MLM people commenting on it, but it was so funny to see my friend have a fit about "the internet" and how you couldn't trust it.

Alfred J Quack

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 311
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1275 on: August 15, 2019, 03:59:37 AM »
MLM story: buddy of mine got into something with auto parts. When showing me the fuel additive, I looked it up online and he began to panic, telling me you couldn't trust the internet. When I found a site it said positive things, and there were comments of people saying, "hey, where can I get this stuff?".

I see now that it was probably MLM people commenting on it, but it was so funny to see my friend have a fit about "the internet" and how you couldn't trust it.
This is actually quite funny. My wife has a thing where she points me to internet sources to prove her point but when I point her to another source that disproves it the result is "I shouldn't believe everything I read".

The points are mainly modern western medicine versus traditional chinese medicine (as in herbs). Yes honey, lets agree to disagree, my hayfever is under control with western medicine but every herb she points me to had 0 effect on it.

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2189
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1276 on: August 15, 2019, 08:35:47 AM »
MLM story: buddy of mine got into something with auto parts. When showing me the fuel additive, I looked it up online and he began to panic, telling me you couldn't trust the internet. When I found a site it said positive things, and there were comments of people saying, "hey, where can I get this stuff?".

I see now that it was probably MLM people commenting on it, but it was so funny to see my friend have a fit about "the internet" and how you couldn't trust it.
This is actually quite funny. My wife has a thing where she points me to internet sources to prove her point but when I point her to another source that disproves it the result is "I shouldn't believe everything I read".

The points are mainly modern western medicine versus traditional chinese medicine (as in herbs). Yes honey, lets agree to disagree, my hayfever is under control with western medicine but every herb she points me to had 0 effect on it.

The thing with herbal options is that it's sometimes very difficult to manage the dosage because the active ingredient concentration will vary depending on when and how the plant was grown and the conditions under which it has been prepared or stored. There are plenty of herbal options that are indeed reliable and effective enough to be good medicine. Examples I can think of off the top of my head include digitalis (foxglove), aspirin (willow bark), and eugenol (essential oil of cloves). But to get shelf stability and standard concentration, some form of processing is generally required. This is why herbal products that really are effective enough to pass rigorous clinical testing usually go mainstream, at which point they lose their appeal to folks who like non-mainstream remedies.

SweetRedWine

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 59
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1277 on: August 15, 2019, 10:17:21 AM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

I've also seen it on vegetables. I'm sorry, but wtf?

Like canned tomatoes? I have to check any label on seasoned/stewed tomatoes (or any other kind of vegetable). Barley malt is a cheap seasoning agent that doesnít have to be identified beyond ďnatural flavorĒ because it isnít a major allergen. Ditto for frozen veg: I have to make sure thereís no seasoning added.

Itís ridiculous on plain raw, frozen, or canned veg, though.
I had no idea that was a possibility for seasoned/stewed tomatoes.  I've been eating gluten free for a few years now due to an intolerance, and I just learned this summer about the possibility of wheat starch in the adhesive on envelopes.  Now I need to be careful of canned tomatoes too...

OtherJen

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1711
  • Location: Metro Detroit
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1278 on: August 15, 2019, 11:40:59 AM »
In a research lab, sonicating something means to blast it with high-frequency sound waves to break apart cells and release their contents. I have no idea if that's what is meant here.

Yep, sonication is routinely used in processing nanomaterials to disperse them in solution.

It's just a buzz word that I guess sounds cool and science-y to the general public, but makes no sense to include because it doesn't imply much about the efficacy or action of the product.

It reminds me of a natural shampoo label I saw once that boasted that it was gluten-free. Well, of course it's gluten-free, it's a shampoo!

And update on my mom - she's been taking the CBD for 3 days so far and says she thinks she feels better...placebo or a real effect, I don't know, but I'm glad it's helping!

Must be about 20 years ago now that I saw shampoo advertising "Contains DNA!", which might be even more brainless than "Gluten-free!".

I have celiac disease. Iíve increasingly seen wheat and barley extracts added to cosmetics and hair care products in the last several years, and some people with celiac disease and wheat allergy have bad skin reactions to gluten. So as ridiculous as it sounds to the non-allergic, thereís a valid reason for the label. (Disclaimer: I have a PhD in immunology and a fairly strong bullshit detector.)

I've also seen it on vegetables. I'm sorry, but wtf?

Like canned tomatoes? I have to check any label on seasoned/stewed tomatoes (or any other kind of vegetable). Barley malt is a cheap seasoning agent that doesnít have to be identified beyond ďnatural flavorĒ because it isnít a major allergen. Ditto for frozen veg: I have to make sure thereís no seasoning added.

Itís ridiculous on plain raw, frozen, or canned veg, though.
I had no idea that was a possibility for seasoned/stewed tomatoes.  I've been eating gluten free for a few years now due to an intolerance, and I just learned this summer about the possibility of wheat starch in the adhesive on envelopes.  Now I need to be careful of canned tomatoes too...

I donít know how common it is in stewed/seasoned tomatoes. For safetyís sake, I tend to avoid things containing ďnatural flavorsĒ unless I can confirm that the product is gluten-free.

Just Joe

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3218
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1279 on: August 16, 2019, 07:52:21 AM »
MLM story: buddy of mine got into something with auto parts. When showing me the fuel additive, I looked it up online and he began to panic, telling me you couldn't trust the internet. When I found a site it said positive things, and there were comments of people saying, "hey, where can I get this stuff?".

I see now that it was probably MLM people commenting on it, but it was so funny to see my friend have a fit about "the internet" and how you couldn't trust it.

There are some huge forum threads about engine oils and additives. Sort of like discussing paying off the mortgage early here.

Hunny156

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 459
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1280 on: August 26, 2019, 01:34:56 PM »
Ugh, I just want to vent about someone I know who is purposely misleading people.

This woman is the wife of my hubby's former co-worker, so we have a pretty good idea of what he makes.  The wife has worked at a very large, well established company for north of 20 years, and is in a mgmt role, so she likely makes close to what her husband makes.  Between the two, well into 6 figure territory, and we live in a low-medium COL area.  One adult child who hasn't lived in the home in years.

Earlier this year, she joins Paparazzi.  This is the MLM that sells cheap jewelry for $5/piece.  I suspect the wife is bored b/c hubby travels a lot, and is looking for something to fill her time.  She's clearly reading the books and following the script - always posting fun questions as she goes about her day that have nothing to do w/the MLM, so she should be improving her chance of getting seen on feeds as a result.  I know what she's doing, so I just watch and never post.  She also goes live at least 2X/wk to sell her wares, and when I have scrolled past, she never has more that 10 people watching.

A few weeks ago, there was a post showing how their home had recently gotten an exterior paint job - not sure if there was a storm that caused damage, but the tone of it seemed to indicate that this was an unexpected expense, followed by the boasting that this paint job was expensive and completely paid for by the MLM income, tons of hashtags about it wasn't fake news, blah blah blah.

Yesterday, she shared a post from her upline, announcing to the team that she had been "promoted" to director level, and how amazing it was and how proud she was to work someplace where they value her efforts, etc.  I'd say her real job values her, as she's moved several times so her husband could pursue better paying work, and they allow her to work remote, no problem.  Plus, she actively manages a team of people in her real job, so this was all just so painfully fake.  Along with every single comment coming from someone on the team, of course.

So, it piqued my interest enough to do a quick search.  Director is the 3 lowest rank in the company; the first rank is placing one order, one time.  Achieving director level means that she has suckered 3 others to join her team, and all four of them have sold 25 pieces in the past month.  She now gets a 10% cut of what they sell, plus they all make $2.25 on each $5 sale.  So, assuming that she sells 25 pieces, she makes $56.25.  If each of her downline sells 25 pieces, she makes $12.50 on each of them, for a whopping $37.50. So not even $94/month in income makes you a Director.  And of course, this isn't counting her time, all the boards she had to buy to display her wares, inventory carrying costs, number tags to identify which lot people are buying on her lives, etc.  And it took her at least 6 months to get to this level!  I'm sure that Paparazzi didn't even cover a quart of paint for that house paint job, much less all the materials and the labor to do the work.

I think the reason it annoys me so much is that she knows better.  She's willfully lying to people to get them to join her team, knowing that they won't make crap doing this, but she's OK with stealing a little money from each of them, and I have no doubt that none of her recruits can afford to waste money on this scheme.  We often talk about how much it sucks to have your friendship monetized, but to monetize and ruin people for a few dollars a month?  Get a part time job in fast food, you'd make actual income and find people willing to socialize with you!

Just Joe

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3218
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1281 on: August 26, 2019, 04:00:13 PM »
So if my kid cuts four yards a month - they can assume the title of director? So how about our other kid who works while going to school and clears $15K+ a year?

What title can that kid print under his name? Surpreme Overlord of the Universe?

The amount of work the MLM folks do for $100 is astounding to me. Multiple hours of BS to sell baubles and shiny things?

jinga nation

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1276
  • Location: 'Murica's Johnson
  • Left, Right, Peddlin' Shite
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1282 on: August 27, 2019, 06:31:52 AM »
MLMs... where title inflation is rampant and jingoistic without correlation to reality. You are not what your title says if your first sale promotes you to Director status. You're just a trinket peddler.
The only other industry where I see title inflation is banking & finance. Recently saw a bank cashier/teller's badge was "Associate VP of Client Services".

Travis

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2602
  • Location: South Korea
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1283 on: August 27, 2019, 06:51:46 AM »
MLMs... where title inflation is rampant and jingoistic without correlation to reality. You are not what your title says if your first sale promotes you to Director status. You're just a trinket peddler.
The only other industry where I see title inflation is banking & finance. Recently saw a bank cashier/teller's badge was "Associate VP of Client Services".

The guys from Personal Capital who call me twice a year to pitch their company call themselves Vice Presidents.

merula

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1291
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1284 on: August 27, 2019, 07:05:30 AM »
MLMs... where title inflation is rampant and jingoistic without correlation to reality. You are not what your title says if your first sale promotes you to Director status. You're just a trinket peddler.
The only other industry where I see title inflation is banking & finance. Recently saw a bank cashier/teller's badge was "Associate VP of Client Services".

The guys from Personal Capital who call me twice a year to pitch their company call themselves Vice Presidents.

Yep, this is HUGE in client-facing parts of financial services. The issue is that, if you're providing financial services to midsize or larger clients, you're probably dealing with a C-level or VP title at the client, so it's a way to appear to be at their level to give them some confidence in your abilities. I don't know if it actually works like that (surely the clients are smart enough to see that the 22 y/o Associate Vice President is an inflated title?), but it's become a massive joke in insurance. People at insurance carriers have relatively normal titles (entry level might be "Account Executive" or something), but people at insurance brokerages (Marsh, Willis, Aon) will have Vice President or Executive Vice President at the same level.

The really funny thing is, the people who are ACTUALLY very high level have titles like "Head of XXX" or "Lead XXX".

BeanCounter

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1444
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1285 on: August 27, 2019, 07:08:51 AM »
The only other industry where I see title inflation is banking & finance. Recently saw a bank cashier/teller's badge was "Associate VP of Client Services".

Totally agree on the banking. I've been fascinated with this for years. But lets not throw "finance" in there. I'm a Director of Finance at a hospital system and I work damn hard for that title. The amount of work I'd have to do to have a VP title is no joke.

Hunny156

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 459
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1286 on: August 27, 2019, 10:10:33 AM »
Morgan Stanley was notorious for this, and probably still is.  I interviewed there once, and the title was Associate VP of Trading Floor Operations.  In layman terms, Office Manager.

Alfred J Quack

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 311
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1287 on: August 27, 2019, 10:44:52 AM »
Morgan Stanley was notorious for this, and probably still is.  I interviewed there once, and the title was Associate VP of Trading Floor Operations.  In layman terms, Office Manager.
Does that also mean that the Associate VP needs an Associate degree?

My school tried to sucker me into one of those, which was a 2 years course vs the full degree being a 4 year course. They say it's accepted as equivalent to a full degree but I asked around and the managers I spoke related it in qualifications to the same degree I already had. So thanks but no thanks.

Hunny156

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 459
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1288 on: August 28, 2019, 09:00:53 AM »
Morgan Stanley was notorious for this, and probably still is.  I interviewed there once, and the title was Associate VP of Trading Floor Operations.  In layman terms, Office Manager.
Does that also mean that the Associate VP needs an Associate degree?

My school tried to sucker me into one of those, which was a 2 years course vs the full degree being a 4 year course. They say it's accepted as equivalent to a full degree but I asked around and the managers I spoke related it in qualifications to the same degree I already had. So thanks but no thanks.

Nope, I have a Bachelor's degree.  I surmised that based on pretty much everyone having a VP title there, they used terms like "associate" to mean it was a more Jr role.  At the time, I remember hubby getting a little upset b/c he had recently joined LinkedIn, and pretty much everyone he connected with from our college days, had these amazing titles.  Meanwhile we were basically an Office Manager and a Sales Manager.  Then the economy imploded, and the finance sector did as well, so those lofty titles disappeared.  We had some bumps along the way too, but our modest jobs made it through the hard times, and we'll be retired soon.  All that glitters is not gold.

Epor

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 176
  • One day at the time
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1289 on: August 28, 2019, 09:26:56 AM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

partgypsy

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3485
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1290 on: September 16, 2019, 02:25:02 PM »
I was just invited, in Brazil, to a MLM thing based on consuption and selling of RICE AND BEANS (???)
Thay say basically to stop buying what you would usually buy in a supermarket, and instead buying in their market, and invite friends to do the same and collect profits on their purchases.

I'm still confused, never heard of it before.

Are you sure it's not a co-op? A co-op is where you buy something cheaper in bulk, and you divide the cost with multiple people. I used to do it way back when in college (think 10 pound blocks of cheese, beans, grains, etc, organic stuff etc).

gatortator

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 186
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1291 on: October 10, 2019, 05:40:45 PM »
has any here heard of True North Beauty? Is this a MLM?  the vibe was inconclusive when I went to the website.  a candidate for the upcoming local election claims to be a development consultant for them and that phrase triggers something not quite right.

geekette

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1883
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1292 on: October 10, 2019, 08:23:17 PM »
has any here heard of True North Beauty? Is this a MLM?  the vibe was inconclusive when I went to the website.  a candidate for the upcoming local election claims to be a development consultant for them and that phrase triggers something not quite right.

Doesn't look like it to me.  They're not on the Reddit list, you have to order from their site, and I see no mention of "consultants".

The_Big_H

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1293 on: October 13, 2019, 01:56:38 PM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

We already have that here, he has big black round ears

Malkynn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1727
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1294 on: October 13, 2019, 01:59:18 PM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

We already have that here, he has big black round ears

Uh...wut??

NoVa

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 136
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1295 on: October 13, 2019, 07:18:53 PM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

We already have that here, he has big black round ears

Uh...wut??
Disney/Mickey Mouse

jinga nation

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1276
  • Location: 'Murica's Johnson
  • Left, Right, Peddlin' Shite
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1296 on: October 14, 2019, 11:36:16 AM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

We already have that here, he has big black round ears

Uh...wut??
Disney/Mickey Mouse
Aka The Swamp Rat. He has his own cops. Rat's got power. Always Be Collecting, which is why he bought ABC.

Malkynn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1727
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1297 on: October 14, 2019, 02:15:50 PM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

We already have that here, he has big black round ears

Uh...wut??
Disney/Mickey Mouse
Aka The Swamp Rat. He has his own cops. Rat's got power. Always Be Collecting, which is why he bought ABC.

Mice and rats are very different animals.

Maenad

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 531
  • Location: Minneapolis 'burbs
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1298 on: October 15, 2019, 05:11:57 AM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

We already have that here, he has big black round ears

Uh...wut??
Disney/Mickey Mouse
Aka The Swamp Rat. He has his own cops. Rat's got power. Always Be Collecting, which is why he bought ABC.

Mice and rats are very different animals.

Fine. Be all logical and rational and factual. Spoil everyone's fun. ;-)

Malkynn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1727
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1299 on: October 15, 2019, 05:31:00 AM »
If you have Showtime: there is a new TV Series starring Kirsten Dunst about a MLM/Pyramid scheme (Likely based on Amway). Two episodes out, and I'm hooked.

"On becoming a god in central Florida"

We already have that here, he has big black round ears

Uh...wut??
Disney/Mickey Mouse
Aka The Swamp Rat. He has his own cops. Rat's got power. Always Be Collecting, which is why he bought ABC.

Mice and rats are very different animals.

Fine. Be all logical and rational and factual. Spoil everyone's fun. ;-)

I'm actually being extremely silly.
I worked with rats and mice for years. I really like rats, and REALLY dislike mice, so I jokingly get offended every time someone equates them, as if it's some kind of insult to the rats.