Author Topic: No, I won't buy into your MLM  (Read 353357 times)

LifeHappens

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7267
  • Location: SnowBirdLand
  • Downshifting from 5th to 3rd Gear
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1200 on: July 19, 2019, 11:51:28 AM »

 her new mother in law is a pampered Chef consultant.


Was Pampered Chef less ridiculous in the days before it was easy to order stuff on Amazon? I remember my mom buying a lot of stuff from it - and she is excellent at money - because it was genuinely good stuff and they had a lot of specialty items that you'd have to go to a cookware store for (at least an hour away from our house). In the current age of instant access for what you need, these parties are beyond stupid; but there WAS a time when many parties were likely providing genuinely needed stuff.

(This is obviously excluding companies that sell junk/crap that falls apart in two seconds. And I hate all things MLM. But it's easy to forget that procuring objects was a lot harder not that long ago.)
I think so. They do sell good quality items - their pizza stones are particularly well loved. I am surprised they've survived internet retail. Their prices can't possibly be competitive anymore.


Sugaree

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 618
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1202 on: July 22, 2019, 06:31:06 AM »

 her new mother in law is a pampered Chef consultant.


Was Pampered Chef less ridiculous in the days before it was easy to order stuff on Amazon? I remember my mom buying a lot of stuff from it - and she is excellent at money - because it was genuinely good stuff and they had a lot of specialty items that you'd have to go to a cookware store for (at least an hour away from our house). In the current age of instant access for what you need, these parties are beyond stupid; but there WAS a time when many parties were likely providing genuinely needed stuff.

(This is obviously excluding companies that sell junk/crap that falls apart in two seconds. And I hate all things MLM. But it's easy to forget that procuring objects was a lot harder not that long ago.)
I think so. They do sell good quality items - their pizza stones are particularly well loved. I am surprised they've survived internet retail. Their prices can't possibly be competitive anymore.

I've got a few PC pieces that my mother-in-law gave me.  I like them, but it's kind of like the Yeti cup that she also gave me; it's nice, but I'm not going to spend that much for it when there's something cheaper that works just as well.

iris lily

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3395
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1203 on: July 22, 2019, 08:05:12 AM »
When my PAmpered Chef can opener broke, I put a call out to Nextdoor for a Pampered Chef representative to contact me.

Crickets.

What a strange world it is when one wants to buy from an MLM company and one gets silence!

I ended up finding a can opener at Target or ? but it took me a couple models until I got one that was well-made solid and did what I wanted it to do.

Davnasty

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2114
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1204 on: July 22, 2019, 08:09:31 AM »
When my PAmpered Chef can opener broke, I put a call out to Nextdoor for a Pampered Chef representative to contact me.

Crickets.

What a strange world it is when one wants to buy from an MLM company and one gets silence!

I ended up finding a can opener at Target or ? but it took me a couple models until I got one that was well-made solid and did what I wanted it to do.

Open cans? :)

iris lily

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3395
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1205 on: July 22, 2019, 08:16:41 AM »
When my PAmpered Chef can opener broke, I put a call out to Nextdoor for a Pampered Chef representative to contact me.

Crickets.

What a strange world it is when one wants to buy from an MLM company and one gets silence!

I ended up finding a can opener at Target or ? but it took me a couple models until I got one that was well-made solid and did what I wanted it to do.

Open cans? :)
Open cans with no ragged edge. Be sturdy and last a few years.

Davnasty

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2114
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1206 on: July 22, 2019, 08:44:58 AM »
When my PAmpered Chef can opener broke, I put a call out to Nextdoor for a Pampered Chef representative to contact me.

Crickets.

What a strange world it is when one wants to buy from an MLM company and one gets silence!

I ended up finding a can opener at Target or ? but it took me a couple models until I got one that was well-made solid and did what I wanted it to do.

Open cans? :)
Open cans with no ragged edge. Be sturdy and last a few years.

Was just kidding, a good can opener is not easy to find.

Have you ever tried the lid opening style? Rather than cutting through the metal they separate the lid from the can just enough to break the adhesive seal, then you can lift the whole lid off. no cut edges and it's super consistent. Only draw back is if you like to push the lid down into the can for draining. Can't do that as the lid diameter is greater than the can diameter.

https://www.finecooking.com/article/equipment-review-smooth-edge-can-openers-are-a-cut-above

katethekitcat

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 27
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1207 on: July 22, 2019, 02:11:57 PM »

 her new mother in law is a pampered Chef consultant.


Was Pampered Chef less ridiculous in the days before it was easy to order stuff on Amazon? I remember my mom buying a lot of stuff from it - and she is excellent at money - because it was genuinely good stuff and they had a lot of specialty items that you'd have to go to a cookware store for (at least an hour away from our house). In the current age of instant access for what you need, these parties are beyond stupid; but there WAS a time when many parties were likely providing genuinely needed stuff.

(This is obviously excluding companies that sell junk/crap that falls apart in two seconds. And I hate all things MLM. But it's easy to forget that procuring objects was a lot harder not that long ago.)
I think so. They do sell good quality items - their pizza stones are particularly well loved. I am surprised they've survived internet retail. Their prices can't possibly be competitive anymore.

The pizza stone my parents still use is the Pampered Chef one my mom got 20 years ago :)

zolotiyeruki

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3296
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1208 on: July 22, 2019, 02:34:25 PM »
The pizza stone my parents still use is the Pampered Chef one my mom got 20 years ago :)
FWIW, we got one for our wedding 16 years ago, and it has held up very, very well.

Alfred J Quack

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 312
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1209 on: July 23, 2019, 01:01:23 AM »
The pizza stone my parents still use is the Pampered Chef one my mom got 20 years ago :)
FWIW, we got one for our wedding 16 years ago, and it has held up very, very well.
To be fair, it's a stone. Except for dropping it or extreme temperature changes, what could go wrong?

zolotiyeruki

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3296
  • Location: State: Denial
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1210 on: July 23, 2019, 08:39:04 AM »
The pizza stone my parents still use is the Pampered Chef one my mom got 20 years ago :)
FWIW, we got one for our wedding 16 years ago, and it has held up very, very well.
To be fair, it's a stone. Except for dropping it or extreme temperature changes, what could go wrong?
Heh :)  Compared to others, it hasn't chipped, and it came with a smooth surface (better for not sticking) that has just gotten better with age.

FIREJD2B

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1211 on: July 26, 2019, 08:30:13 PM »
I hope it's fine to make requests here, but can someone point me in the direction of some good links addressing how few people make any money in MLMs in general and Amway in particular? I have an acquaintance I was discussing FIRE topics with, and it turns out that this person's SO is involved with Amway, who apparently are also using "financial independence" related terminology in their pitches (sigh).

I am going to send some links explaining why MLMs/Amway are remarkably unlikely to deliver on the financial promises that they make, and I was also going to suggest that the person track their earnings/expenses carefully if they do end up continuing with it, since that's the only way to honestly determine whether it's actually profitable. Any other suggestions for points that I should consider making?

I don't have any delusions that I can convince someone to ditch Amway with one email, but I figure if there is anything I can do that might cause this person to leave Amway two years from now rather than in five years, then that's still a win. I know I've seen some discussions in this thread (and maybe other threads?) that seemed relevant, but I didn't want to parse through hundreds of replies to try to locate the best potential links if someone had good ones readily available.

sparkytheop

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 856
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1212 on: July 26, 2019, 10:42:29 PM »
I hope it's fine to make requests here, but can someone point me in the direction of some good links addressing how few people make any money in MLMs in general and Amway in particular? I have an acquaintance I was discussing FIRE topics with, and it turns out that this person's SO is involved with Amway, who apparently are also using "financial independence" related terminology in their pitches (sigh).

I am going to send some links explaining why MLMs/Amway are remarkably unlikely to deliver on the financial promises that they make, and I was also going to suggest that the person track their earnings/expenses carefully if they do end up continuing with it, since that's the only way to honestly determine whether it's actually profitable. Any other suggestions for points that I should consider making?

I don't have any delusions that I can convince someone to ditch Amway with one email, but I figure if there is anything I can do that might cause this person to leave Amway two years from now rather than in five years, then that's still a win. I know I've seen some discussions in this thread (and maybe other threads?) that seemed relevant, but I didn't want to parse through hundreds of replies to try to locate the best potential links if someone had good ones readily available.

A big problem you'll run into is that people, especially in Amway, have already been programmed that others are "negative" and never listen to someone with a "J.O.B.", and definitely don't track expenses and earnings because that's not the point, "it takes money to make money", and if you are dedicated, you might lose some at the beginning, but you just have to keep doing it and it will be worth it.  It's cult level and the brainwashing is subtle at first, but intense. 

All that said, they probably will not read any links you send, because the links are never true, just trust the upline, but...

The FTC report, long but lots of good stuff in there: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00008%C2%A0/00008-57281.pdf

Also, look up "Merchants of Deception".  The man who wrote it was a quick rising star in Amway, got in like the top 2%, found corruption, reported corruption, and they tried to tear him apart.  He almost lost everything.  Even at that level, he wasn't making enough money to cover basic bills.  It's a (legal) free pdf download (he wants it spread far and wide).  There are other versions for different e-readers as well, I believe.

FIREJD2B

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1213 on: July 27, 2019, 12:42:49 PM »
I hope it's fine to make requests here, but can someone point me in the direction of some good links addressing how few people make any money in MLMs in general and Amway in particular? I have an acquaintance I was discussing FIRE topics with, and it turns out that this person's SO is involved with Amway, who apparently are also using "financial independence" related terminology in their pitches (sigh).

I am going to send some links explaining why MLMs/Amway are remarkably unlikely to deliver on the financial promises that they make, and I was also going to suggest that the person track their earnings/expenses carefully if they do end up continuing with it, since that's the only way to honestly determine whether it's actually profitable. Any other suggestions for points that I should consider making?

I don't have any delusions that I can convince someone to ditch Amway with one email, but I figure if there is anything I can do that might cause this person to leave Amway two years from now rather than in five years, then that's still a win. I know I've seen some discussions in this thread (and maybe other threads?) that seemed relevant, but I didn't want to parse through hundreds of replies to try to locate the best potential links if someone had good ones readily available.

A big problem you'll run into is that people, especially in Amway, have already been programmed that others are "negative" and never listen to someone with a "J.O.B.", and definitely don't track expenses and earnings because that's not the point, "it takes money to make money", and if you are dedicated, you might lose some at the beginning, but you just have to keep doing it and it will be worth it.  It's cult level and the brainwashing is subtle at first, but intense. 

All that said, they probably will not read any links you send, because the links are never true, just trust the upline, but...

The FTC report, long but lots of good stuff in there: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00008%C2%A0/00008-57281.pdf

Also, look up "Merchants of Deception".  The man who wrote it was a quick rising star in Amway, got in like the top 2%, found corruption, reported corruption, and they tried to tear him apart.  He almost lost everything.  Even at that level, he wasn't making enough money to cover basic bills.  It's a (legal) free pdf download (he wants it spread far and wide).  There are other versions for different e-readers as well, I believe.

Thank you! This is all very helpful; much appreciated.

Travis

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2642
  • Location: South Korea
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1214 on: July 27, 2019, 10:53:31 PM »
I hope it's fine to make requests here, but can someone point me in the direction of some good links addressing how few people make any money in MLMs in general and Amway in particular? I have an acquaintance I was discussing FIRE topics with, and it turns out that this person's SO is involved with Amway, who apparently are also using "financial independence" related terminology in their pitches (sigh).

I am going to send some links explaining why MLMs/Amway are remarkably unlikely to deliver on the financial promises that they make, and I was also going to suggest that the person track their earnings/expenses carefully if they do end up continuing with it, since that's the only way to honestly determine whether it's actually profitable. Any other suggestions for points that I should consider making?

I don't have any delusions that I can convince someone to ditch Amway with one email, but I figure if there is anything I can do that might cause this person to leave Amway two years from now rather than in five years, then that's still a win. I know I've seen some discussions in this thread (and maybe other threads?) that seemed relevant, but I didn't want to parse through hundreds of replies to try to locate the best potential links if someone had good ones readily available.

A big problem you'll run into is that people, especially in Amway, have already been programmed that others are "negative" and never listen to someone with a "J.O.B.", and definitely don't track expenses and earnings because that's not the point, "it takes money to make money", and if you are dedicated, you might lose some at the beginning, but you just have to keep doing it and it will be worth it.  It's cult level and the brainwashing is subtle at first, but intense. 

All that said, they probably will not read any links you send, because the links are never true, just trust the upline, but...

The FTC report, long but lots of good stuff in there: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00008%C2%A0/00008-57281.pdf

Also, look up "Merchants of Deception".  The man who wrote it was a quick rising star in Amway, got in like the top 2%, found corruption, reported corruption, and they tried to tear him apart.  He almost lost everything.  Even at that level, he wasn't making enough money to cover basic bills.  It's a (legal) free pdf download (he wants it spread far and wide).  There are other versions for different e-readers as well, I believe.

Thank you! This is all very helpful; much appreciated.

Look on Page 2 of this thread. There are a couple color charts that show a particular MLM where 80% of the members make $400/year.  The only people making enough to be considered successful in that particular business have to be either officers in the company or have down-lines consisting of dozens of people. Compensation distributions like that are typical of MLMs.

FIREJD2B

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 20
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1215 on: July 28, 2019, 11:28:39 AM »
I hope it's fine to make requests here, but can someone point me in the direction of some good links addressing how few people make any money in MLMs in general and Amway in particular? I have an acquaintance I was discussing FIRE topics with, and it turns out that this person's SO is involved with Amway, who apparently are also using "financial independence" related terminology in their pitches (sigh).

I am going to send some links explaining why MLMs/Amway are remarkably unlikely to deliver on the financial promises that they make, and I was also going to suggest that the person track their earnings/expenses carefully if they do end up continuing with it, since that's the only way to honestly determine whether it's actually profitable. Any other suggestions for points that I should consider making?

I don't have any delusions that I can convince someone to ditch Amway with one email, but I figure if there is anything I can do that might cause this person to leave Amway two years from now rather than in five years, then that's still a win. I know I've seen some discussions in this thread (and maybe other threads?) that seemed relevant, but I didn't want to parse through hundreds of replies to try to locate the best potential links if someone had good ones readily available.

A big problem you'll run into is that people, especially in Amway, have already been programmed that others are "negative" and never listen to someone with a "J.O.B.", and definitely don't track expenses and earnings because that's not the point, "it takes money to make money", and if you are dedicated, you might lose some at the beginning, but you just have to keep doing it and it will be worth it.  It's cult level and the brainwashing is subtle at first, but intense. 

All that said, they probably will not read any links you send, because the links are never true, just trust the upline, but...

The FTC report, long but lots of good stuff in there: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/public_comments/trade-regulation-rule-disclosure-requirements-and-prohibitions-concerning-business-opportunities-ftc.r511993-00008%C2%A0/00008-57281.pdf

Also, look up "Merchants of Deception".  The man who wrote it was a quick rising star in Amway, got in like the top 2%, found corruption, reported corruption, and they tried to tear him apart.  He almost lost everything.  Even at that level, he wasn't making enough money to cover basic bills.  It's a (legal) free pdf download (he wants it spread far and wide).  There are other versions for different e-readers as well, I believe.

Thank you! This is all very helpful; much appreciated.

Look on Page 2 of this thread. There are a couple color charts that show a particular MLM where 80% of the members make $400/year.  The only people making enough to be considered successful in that particular business have to be either officers in the company or have down-lines consisting of dozens of people. Compensation distributions like that are typical of MLMs.

Thanks. Seeing the (horrifying) info for the Plexus distributors helped me figure out the right terms to plug into Google to find the similar available information for Amway. This third-party compilation of Amway Earnings Disclosure Statements was very helpful: http://www.sequenceinc.com/fraudfiles/amway-earnings-disclosure-statements/

Similar information is also available on some of Amway's official websites, which seems helpful for responding to the inevitable objection that people are lying about Amway. See https://www.amway.com/lcl/en/ResourceCenterDocuments/Visitor/opp-amw-cat-v-en--AmwayBusinessOverviewBrochure.pdf and https://www.amway.co.uk/_cms-fileserver/item/1500475

Even if I don't expect it to be immediately persuasive, maybe this information will help the person realize they're being taken advantage of in the nearer future than would otherwise be the case.

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1216 on: July 29, 2019, 07:33:26 AM »
I hope it's fine to make requests here, but can someone point me in the direction of some good links addressing how few people make any money in MLMs in general and Amway in particular? I have an acquaintance I was discussing FIRE topics with, and it turns out that this person's SO is involved with Amway, who apparently are also using "financial independence" related terminology in their pitches (sigh).

I am going to send some links explaining why MLMs/Amway are remarkably unlikely to deliver on the financial promises that they make, and I was also going to suggest that the person track their earnings/expenses carefully if they do end up continuing with it, since that's the only way to honestly determine whether it's actually profitable. Any other suggestions for points that I should consider making?

I don't have any delusions that I can convince someone to ditch Amway with one email, but I figure if there is anything I can do that might cause this person to leave Amway two years from now rather than in five years, then that's still a win. I know I've seen some discussions in this thread (and maybe other threads?) that seemed relevant, but I didn't want to parse through hundreds of replies to try to locate the best potential links if someone had good ones readily available.

You are correct. You cannot convince them, so just let it run its course.

Example: A friend pitched me on the Amway Visa years back. The rewards were a compensation of 1% "BV". If you bought $1,000 of stuff, you got 10 BV, which grossed you a taxable $0.30, compared to a tax-free $10.00 on any other cash back card. He mentioned there was a 50 BV bonus for signing up. I tried to show him the 10,000 JetBlue pts I just got, which could fly me round trip to a couple places.

But, there was nothing I could say or do.

In the end, I said, "I'll sign up for the CC if there's no annual fee." He was ecstatic, like I'd made a huge order. The card came in and I tossed it.

Books you can read, and other resources (for you, not your friend; they won't listen):
 - Merchants of Deception: By a former Emerald IBO who netted something like $20,000 a year. His book led to huge increases in the Amway compensation plan for people at his level. It also exposed that the real money being made was by whoever ran things like seminars, etc.

 - Behind the Smoke and Mirrors: Written by a former Amway person who was the personal assistant for a big wig in her upline. She discovered it was all just a show. They'd make something like $100,000 a year from Amway, and maybe another $400,000 a year with stadium events.
       - Sadly, even with all this income, they lived like they made 2x that, flying in private jets, and buying new mansions.

 - IRS info. There was a report years ago that the average Platinum in Amway operated at a loss. This isn't hard to believe, particularly if they are working hard to get to the next level and just living off of their regular job income, unless you're in Amway, then it's all hard to believe.

It would be funny if it wasn't so sad.

Bloop Bloop

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1086
  • Location: Melbourne, Australia
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1217 on: July 29, 2019, 03:22:47 PM »
You have to understand that people don't go into MLM to "make money". On some level they understand it's a lottery. They go into MLM to have a vague hope of someday striking it rich, while being able to spruik the lifestyle benefits of not having to work in an office environment. MLM is for people with poor self-perception who are seeking to tell themselves they are important.

Malkynn

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1970
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1218 on: July 29, 2019, 03:34:05 PM »
You have to understand that people don't go into MLM to "make money". On some level they understand it's a lottery. They go into MLM to have a vague hope of someday striking it rich, while being able to spruik the lifestyle benefits of not having to work in an office environment. MLM is for people with poor self-perception who are seeking to tell themselves they are important.

Actually A LOT of people go into MLM to make money, especially stay at home moms.

Just Joe

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3289
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1219 on: July 29, 2019, 06:58:50 PM »

lv2glrfy

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1220 on: July 29, 2019, 09:47:57 PM »
One that I almost was fooled by (as a 12 year old athlete with big dreams of making it™️) was the MonaVie açaí berry (“superfruit”) juice. 😂 I searched them up recently—they went under several years ago.


 There was a lady driving around our town a few years ago, about 60 yrs old i guess, but she looked Rough !, rode hard and put away wet, too many nights smoking at the bar - anyhow she drove around in a beat-up Geo Metro with huge MonaVie lettering on the side. The 1st impression was that she got into the 'superfruit' too late. the 2nd impression was she was not making any money, given her rattletrap of a vehicle.  I suppose she could've been eschewing owning a "nice" car, but i doubt it....

Laughing way too hard at this. Hope that lady's doing better nowadays. The mom who sold it on our sports team was definitely not in it for the money--her husband made big $$$. She probably just wanted to get the discount/member's price for products so she could give them to her own kid athlete.

Fomerly known as something

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 804
  • Location: Midwest
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1221 on: July 31, 2019, 05:27:21 AM »
The Administrative Officer at work brought in the Norwex catalogs yesterday.  I don't know if she is actually the "seller."  She did ask me once if I wanted to order anything, I said no.  The other Admin person was buying.  I wonder if she asked the two men in the office if they were interested.   

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1222 on: July 31, 2019, 05:39:41 AM »
An auditor came into our office  and on the way out gives a catalog to an accountant her age, saying she thought she might be interested. The accountant smiled and thanked her.

"Can you believe her?" the accountant asked. "She has some nerve."

I was young so didn't understand, but the accountant explained that here they hired her for her independent auditing services, and she breaches protocol by crossing a line that could put everything into question.

Also, what kind of an idiot is going around making hundreds of dollars per hour and then does MLM on the side? It's ridiculous.

FindingFI

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 134
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1223 on: July 31, 2019, 07:32:49 AM »
After a lengthy period of not seeing any MLM related stuff on Facebook, I think one has crept into my feed.  Three different people, who don't know each other to the best of my knowledge, have posted recently about this incredible tooth whitening paste that is amazing and they will never switch back to conventional toothpaste. If I want to know more, I just have to comment and some other person will reach out with information. 

No idea what this company is, but the posts are all so similarly vague that is has to be an MLM.  I'm curious which company this is to see if my suspicions are correct, but not curious enough to sign myself up for the sales pitch to find out.

russianswinga

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 211
  • Age: 36
  • Location: San Diego, California, USA
  • Truth is just an excuse for a lack of imagination
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1224 on: July 31, 2019, 03:00:28 PM »
I'm just going to leave this here. Posted in my neighbourhood facebook group. In for a penny, in for a moving truck.

Villanelle

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3132
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1225 on: July 31, 2019, 03:13:48 PM »
You have to understand that people don't go into MLM to "make money". On some level they understand it's a lottery. They go into MLM to have a vague hope of someday striking it rich, while being able to spruik the lifestyle benefits of not having to work in an office environment. MLM is for people with poor self-perception who are seeking to tell themselves they are important.
 

I disagee.  Most of the people I know who do this are looking for supplemental income, not massive riches.  They figure they can SAH with kids and bring in $10,000 a year, which seems like a modest and therefore realistic number, in order to help out their family.  Or something along those things.  Or they already have a regular job and see this as a side hustle.  Spend 10-12 hours a week and make $10,000 to boost their finances. 

I think that's part of why they are so attractive and dangerous.  These are otherwise realistic people, so they'd never bite on something promising them $300k/year.  That would clearly be too good to be true.  But thinking they can make $5-$15k?  It's easy to believe that's realistic precisely because it's a modest number. 

Alfred J Quack

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 312
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1226 on: August 01, 2019, 02:48:57 AM »
I'm just going to leave this here. Posted in my neighbourhood facebook group. In for a penny, in for a moving truck.
Is that allowed? In my country you'd need a license for  vehicle such as this to sell from locations. Then you'd have to worry about shopfront associations of shopping centers if you park too close because they don't want to compete with someone who doesn't pay their rent and such.

LifeHappens

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7267
  • Location: SnowBirdLand
  • Downshifting from 5th to 3rd Gear
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1227 on: August 01, 2019, 07:58:58 AM »
I think that's part of why they are so attractive and dangerous.  These are otherwise realistic people, so they'd never bite on something promising them $300k/year.  That would clearly be too good to be true.  But thinking they can make $5-$15k?  It's easy to believe that's realistic precisely because it's a modest number.
From what I've seen, you are correct. The "best" marketing I've seen for MLMs talks about earning enough income to become a SAHM (never a SAHD, by the way) or frames it as a side-hustle to supplement the family budget. The "drive a Ferrari and live in a mansion" stuff is out there, but the really good recruiters go for people with modest expectations.

Hunny156

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 461
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1228 on: August 01, 2019, 11:18:02 AM »
After a lengthy period of not seeing any MLM related stuff on Facebook, I think one has crept into my feed.  Three different people, who don't know each other to the best of my knowledge, have posted recently about this incredible tooth whitening paste that is amazing and they will never switch back to conventional toothpaste. If I want to know more, I just have to comment and some other person will reach out with information. 

No idea what this company is, but the posts are all so similarly vague that is has to be an MLM.  I'm curious which company this is to see if my suspicions are correct, but not curious enough to sign myself up for the sales pitch to find out.

It's NuSkin, and you can buy it on Amazon.  The reviews indicate that it's a crappy toothpaste, but that seems to be pretty much the status quo on many MLM products these days.

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1229 on: August 01, 2019, 12:47:47 PM »
After a lengthy period of not seeing any MLM related stuff on Facebook, I think one has crept into my feed.  Three different people, who don't know each other to the best of my knowledge, have posted recently about this incredible tooth whitening paste that is amazing and they will never switch back to conventional toothpaste. If I want to know more, I just have to comment and some other person will reach out with information. 

No idea what this company is, but the posts are all so similarly vague that is has to be an MLM.  I'm curious which company this is to see if my suspicions are correct, but not curious enough to sign myself up for the sales pitch to find out.

It's NuSkin, and you can buy it on Amazon.  The reviews indicate that it's a crappy toothpaste, but that seems to be pretty much the status quo on many MLM products these days.

MLM products cannot escape legit reviews. I once patronized a local vitamin shop, and the lady advised I try this really good product for $40, saying that all the guys at the mill nearby used it to keep their energy and health up. So I did, but only took 1 pill instead of the 3 she said to take.

I had a pain in my kidneys and lit up the bathroom with neon pee. After a week, I tossed it, then saw I could review it, and thought it would be best to do so.

Despite having very few reviews, many extremely helpful people chimed in to tell me I was (1) using the vitamins wrong, (2) didn't understand vitamins, (3) was a negative person, and (4) that everything I was saying was suspect because I was bashing this great business.

Seeing the passion of these everyday consumers, I looked up the brand and came to find it's an MLM.

Davnasty

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2114
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1230 on: August 01, 2019, 01:23:08 PM »
After a lengthy period of not seeing any MLM related stuff on Facebook, I think one has crept into my feed.  Three different people, who don't know each other to the best of my knowledge, have posted recently about this incredible tooth whitening paste that is amazing and they will never switch back to conventional toothpaste. If I want to know more, I just have to comment and some other person will reach out with information. 

No idea what this company is, but the posts are all so similarly vague that is has to be an MLM.  I'm curious which company this is to see if my suspicions are correct, but not curious enough to sign myself up for the sales pitch to find out.

It's NuSkin, and you can buy it on Amazon.  The reviews indicate that it's a crappy toothpaste, but that seems to be pretty much the status quo on many MLM products these days.

I find the idea of a toothpaste with "skin" in the brand name terrifying.

Right? I thought Nu Skin was one of those liquid bandage products.

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2200
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1231 on: August 01, 2019, 01:33:23 PM »
After a lengthy period of not seeing any MLM related stuff on Facebook, I think one has crept into my feed.  Three different people, who don't know each other to the best of my knowledge, have posted recently about this incredible tooth whitening paste that is amazing and they will never switch back to conventional toothpaste. If I want to know more, I just have to comment and some other person will reach out with information. 

No idea what this company is, but the posts are all so similarly vague that is has to be an MLM.  I'm curious which company this is to see if my suspicions are correct, but not curious enough to sign myself up for the sales pitch to find out.

It's NuSkin, and you can buy it on Amazon.  The reviews indicate that it's a crappy toothpaste, but that seems to be pretty much the status quo on many MLM products these days.

MLM products cannot escape legit reviews. I once patronized a local vitamin shop, and the lady advised I try this really good product for $40, saying that all the guys at the mill nearby used it to keep their energy and health up. So I did, but only took 1 pill instead of the 3 she said to take.

I had a pain in my kidneys and lit up the bathroom with neon pee. After a week, I tossed it, then saw I could review it, and thought it would be best to do so.

Despite having very few reviews, many extremely helpful people chimed in to tell me I was (1) using the vitamins wrong, (2) didn't understand vitamins, (3) was a negative person, and (4) that everything I was saying was suspect because I was bashing this great business.

Seeing the passion of these everyday consumers, I looked up the brand and came to find it's an MLM.

How in the world is it possible to use the vitamins wrong? They're pills. You swallow them. It's not complicated. What were you supposed to do, cram them up your ass or something? Is that how *they* take their vitamins?

charis

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1786
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1232 on: August 01, 2019, 02:08:32 PM »
I think that's part of why they are so attractive and dangerous.  These are otherwise realistic people, so they'd never bite on something promising them $300k/year.  That would clearly be too good to be true.  But thinking they can make $5-$15k?  It's easy to believe that's realistic precisely because it's a modest number.
From what I've seen, you are correct. The "best" marketing I've seen for MLMs talks about earning enough income to become a SAHM (never a SAHD, by the way) or frames it as a side-hustle to supplement the family budget. The "drive a Ferrari and live in a mansion" stuff is out there, but the really good recruiters go for people with modest expectations.

I've only seen it as a "side hustle," usually a mother who was already interested in the product (likes to cook = Pampered chef; trying to lose weight = Beachbody; already spends a lot on skincare = Rodan Fields, etc) thinking she cover her own costs and maybe a little extra.  But it's usually people who appear to be living beyond their means already.  So it makes me sad.

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1233 on: August 02, 2019, 06:39:45 AM »


How in the world is it possible to use the vitamins wrong? They're pills. You swallow them. It's not complicated. What were you supposed to do, cram them up your ass or something? Is that how *they* take their vitamins?

To have had a bad experience is to be wrong. And that's why this sort of thing doesn't work with normal people. You either have to be too far in, or not at all.

TartanTallulah

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 557
  • Location: The Middle of Scenic Nowhere
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1234 on: August 02, 2019, 08:53:34 AM »
I had a little evil snigger to myself this week.

A few months ago someone I hadn't seen before posted a benign question on a Facebook running group I'm a member of. Some of the diehards in that group can be cruel to people asking rookie questions so I gave her a sensible answer and she friended me and initiated a Messenger chat. Guessing that she was just being enthusiastic, I chatted for a bit about races and melted away when she drifted into "burning calories" territory because I wasn't going to risk getting caught up in eating-disordered talk. She posted a few other benign questions in the group then started putting up posts like, "Snacking is a message to your body to store fat." I'm guessing the mods intervened since that sort of stuff is way off topic.

Then she started making cryptic posts outside the group about how, for less than the cost of a daily Starbucks, she could promise weight loss, forever, without dieting. The magic ingredient was one cup of coffee a day! And we'd be supporting a real person's small business instead of lining the pockets of Big Coffee! And she had been studying nutrition in depth for her entire life and this product she'd developed was The Real Deal! The accompanying photos didn't show the product.

In the meantime, a girl who'd been at school with one of my daughters (early 20s now, pleasant lass, couple of kids) posted an almost identical cryptic message in the local Facebook buying and selling group (without the lifelong study of nutrition bit, because most folk in the group have known her since she was in nappies and would have called her out). The whiff of rodent intensified and I said to Google, "Is this an MLM?" Google replied, "Yes, it could be any one of half a dozen," and provided a list. I was quite excited. I hadn't seen an MLM in the wild since the days of Tupperware parties.

Bless her, the lass from the running group is trying SO hard to sell her magic coffee using all the predictable angles. She's only got a couple of spaces in one of her "weight loss groups", sign up before it's too late! She's got lots of women but could do with another couple of men in her groups for balance, come on boys, you know you want to lose that belly permanently! And she posted a before and after photo which appeared to promise that if you took this product every day for ONLY TWO WEEKS you'd learn how to switch on the bathroom light, your posture would improve beyond recognition, and your tattoos would disappear without a trace. There doesn't appear to be a lot of interest.

The most recent post was a photo of ice cream cones, with an observation of, "Ha ha the kids had ice cream and I was so good I resisted I just had my coffee." I came within a hairsbreadth of pointing out that if her magic slimming coffee did what she claimed, it would be unnecessary to refrain from eating ice cream, and if her coffee only worked if you used it to replace ice cream the slimming diet industry had sussed that trick more than a century ago. But I'm sitting on my hands and waiting to see what happens next. I'm assuming it's a "bored housewife, small financial commitment" situation and fair game for entertainment.
« Last Edit: August 02, 2019, 08:55:12 AM by TartanTallulah »

Hunny156

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 461
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1235 on: August 02, 2019, 10:58:32 AM »


How in the world is it possible to use the vitamins wrong? They're pills. You swallow them. It's not complicated. What were you supposed to do, cram them up your ass or something? Is that how *they* take their vitamins?

Everything is special in the MLM world.  Monat reps claim that people aren't using their shampoo correctly, they need to buy additional products to minimize the detox effect of women losing their hair.  The LipSense huns swear that you aren't applying their lipstick properly when the alcohol in the product causes people to have burns and scarring on their lips.  Btw, that's also a temporary detox effect, you just have to suffer on through and then you'll love the product!  And LLR actually went so far as to put tags in their crap clothing stating "don't put me in the dryer or else you'll be sad".  Washer too, actually.  Color runs and the cheap fabric completely disintegrating in the dryer are well known issues, always caused by the buyer washing them wrong.  It's NEVER the product!

To have had a bad experience is to be wrong. And that's why this sort of thing doesn't work with normal people. You either have to be too far in, or not at all.

Alfred J Quack

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 312
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1236 on: August 02, 2019, 11:05:50 AM »
How in the world is it possible to use the vitamins wrong? They're pills. You swallow them. It's not complicated. What were you supposed to do, cram them up your ass or something? Is that how *they* take their vitamins?
Are you telling me you have to take those pills orally?! No wonder they weren't doing anything for my! And there I thought the big pills were suppositories because of their size, who knew...

/s

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1237 on: August 02, 2019, 11:13:09 AM »
...................The whiff of rodent intensified....................

This was pure gold.

A Fella from Stella

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 525
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1238 on: August 02, 2019, 11:15:44 AM »


How in the world is it possible to use the vitamins wrong? They're pills. You swallow them. It's not complicated. What were you supposed to do, cram them up your ass or something? Is that how *they* take their vitamins?

Everything is special in the MLM world.  Monat reps claim that people aren't using their shampoo correctly, they need to buy additional products to minimize the detox effect of women losing their hair.  The LipSense huns swear that you aren't applying their lipstick properly when the alcohol in the product causes people to have burns and scarring on their lips.  Btw, that's also a temporary detox effect, you just have to suffer on through and then you'll love the product!  And LLR actually went so far as to put tags in their crap clothing stating "don't put me in the dryer or else you'll be sad".  Washer too, actually.  Color runs and the cheap fabric completely disintegrating in the dryer are well known issues, always caused by the buyer washing them wrong.  It's NEVER the product!

To have had a bad experience is to be wrong. And that's why this sort of thing doesn't work with normal people. You either have to be too far in, or not at all.

Amway had Double X vitamins, which I actually thought were good, but if you had a sensitive stomach it was too potent. But say that and you just have a bad attitude.

Epor

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 179
  • One day at the time
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1239 on: August 02, 2019, 11:16:50 AM »
This is so depressing... a couple girls I know are now into Thrive - something something ENERGY <insert emojis> something something LOSE WEIGHT <more emojis> three easy steps: Pills, shake and a skin patch. This 'vitamin' company seems to have diversified recently, as I see more and more about skin products.

Girl A: Just recently reached '4k level' and there was much jubilation... a quick look at those commenting show they are all her Thrive up/down lines.

Girl B: Had pictures taken at fancy car dealership, posing by a very expensive vehicle and saying something about visualizing your success etc.

It breaks my heart.

Eckhart

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 30
  • Location: The Great White North
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1240 on: August 02, 2019, 11:27:03 AM »
A couple years ago I had someone try to sell me some MLM coffee.

Working in my yard, an older gentleman pulls up and comes to talk to me.  Introduces himself and start talking about his family and how his brother is a local business owner (I live in a small town) and other small talk.

Then he shows me the coffee and starts talking about it.  How it has cured so many of his aliments, more energy, weight loss, etc.  Basically, this coffee is pure magic.

I instantly recognize it as an MLM, but am polite and keep listening.  He has a sample pack and thinks I should give it a try and see the benefits.  Really pushing it into my hands.  Being polite, I accept the sample pack and keep chatting.

I say thanks, nice to meet you, ect.  Then he says, "that sample pack is $10".  Can't remember exactly how many samples, but seemed overpriced.  I hand him back the samples and say I'm not interested in paying for this.

He takes the sample and walks back to his truck.  Wife and I have a good laugh afterward about the magic coffee.

merula

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1299
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1241 on: August 02, 2019, 12:56:14 PM »
...................The whiff of rodent intensified....................

This was pure gold.

Wholeheartedly agree. My favorite was
And she posted a before and after photo which appeared to promise that if you took this product every day for ONLY TWO WEEKS you'd learn how to switch on the bathroom light, your posture would improve beyond recognition, and your tattoos would disappear without a trace. There doesn't appear to be a lot of interest.

Thanks, TartanTallulah, made my day!

Travis

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2642
  • Location: South Korea
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1242 on: August 02, 2019, 11:21:41 PM »


Despite having very few reviews, many extremely helpful people chimed in to tell me I was (1) using the vitamins wrong, (2) didn't understand vitamins, (3) was a negative person, and (4) that everything I was saying was suspect because I was bashing this great business.

Seeing the passion of these everyday consumers, I looked up the brand and came to find it's an MLM.

If only the key to a successful business was an emotional attachment to the product. 

aetheldrea

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 108
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1243 on: August 06, 2019, 07:17:27 PM »
After a lengthy period of not seeing any MLM related stuff on Facebook, I think one has crept into my feed.  Three different people, who don't know each other to the best of my knowledge, have posted recently about this incredible tooth whitening paste that is amazing and they will never switch back to conventional toothpaste. If I want to know more, I just have to comment and some other person will reach out with information. 

No idea what this company is, but the posts are all so similarly vague that is has to be an MLM.  I'm curious which company this is to see if my suspicions are correct, but not curious enough to sign myself up for the sales pitch to find out.

It's NuSkin, and you can buy it on Amazon.  The reviews indicate that it's a crappy toothpaste, but that seems to be pretty much the status quo on many MLM products these days.

I find the idea of a toothpaste with "skin" in the brand name terrifying.
Yeah. NuSkin is basically thick Super Glue. I think someone is having a laugh trying to get other people to put it in their mouths.

FindingFI

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 134
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1244 on: August 07, 2019, 05:49:54 AM »
After a lengthy period of not seeing any MLM related stuff on Facebook, I think one has crept into my feed.  Three different people, who don't know each other to the best of my knowledge, have posted recently about this incredible tooth whitening paste that is amazing and they will never switch back to conventional toothpaste. If I want to know more, I just have to comment and some other person will reach out with information. 

No idea what this company is, but the posts are all so similarly vague that is has to be an MLM.  I'm curious which company this is to see if my suspicions are correct, but not curious enough to sign myself up for the sales pitch to find out.

It's NuSkin, and you can buy it on Amazon.  The reviews indicate that it's a crappy toothpaste, but that seems to be pretty much the status quo on many MLM products these days.

I find the idea of a toothpaste with "skin" in the brand name terrifying.
Yeah. NuSkin is basically thick Super Glue. I think someone is having a laugh trying to get other people to put it in their mouths.
Gross! Not that I was planning on trying it before, but I am absolutely not now!

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7020
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1245 on: August 07, 2019, 01:18:52 PM »
...................The whiff of rodent intensified....................

This was pure gold.

Wholeheartedly agree. My favorite was
And she posted a before and after photo which appeared to promise that if you took this product every day for ONLY TWO WEEKS you'd learn how to switch on the bathroom light, your posture would improve beyond recognition, and your tattoos would disappear without a trace. There doesn't appear to be a lot of interest.

Thanks, TartanTallulah, made my day!

Yeah, magic coffee lady is still all over my feed (former Beachbody coach).  She's making so much money and it's a great time to get into the biz!

Until you saturate the market and stop earning money, but ok.  But at least she flat out says it's an MLM.

Misstachian

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 87
  • Location: CT
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1246 on: August 07, 2019, 09:46:18 PM »
Two family members are at an MLM convention right now. They’re learning how to promote even better. They each already post multiple things on social media every day about the product (makeup), and half of their non makeup posts are designed to get them more engagement and more comments ("what should I buy, a or b?") so that more eyes see the makeup posts. I find it all a stretch of the social contract.

They say they love it. They are both deeply in debt and, I think, actually making some money at this, but not nearly as much as they believe after expenses/taxes/Time spent. (To be fair, they are very good at selling this stuff and they look amazing in photos. In person I think the opposite, and heading them talk offline about the weird rashes they’ve gotten from too much product is an additional turn off.) Their separate money situations seem to get worse each year instead of better, though. I hope that’s not true. One is in the other's downline.

I suspect a third family member may be at a different MLM conventionthis same weekend. She has done a lot of MLMs. She earnestly wants to help her family finances but can’t seem to see that this isn’t helping. At one point her husband emailed everyone in the family and implored us to buy her products so that she could fulfill her dream of being a SAHM. I nicely replied that my own dreams of a financially secure family didn’t allow me to buy what she was selling. (Might have been those itworks fat melting wraps? Or makeup? Or health tinctures?)

Of course, I care about these people and their lives and their kids, so I want to see that stuff and don’t like to unfollow. But sigh.

insufFIcientfunds

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 102
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1247 on: August 08, 2019, 11:36:27 AM »
I grow tired of seeing AdvoCare idiots literally everywhere I go. "We build Morons."

Brother-in-Law sells the crap. He is about 400lbs and when he wants to lose weight, he just uses some crap, drops 20-30lbs, then gains it right back.

I just want to tell him to "just walk man, quit eating bacon."

sparkytheop

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 856
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1248 on: August 08, 2019, 01:01:07 PM »
I grow tired of seeing AdvoCare idiots literally everywhere I go. "We build Morons."

Brother-in-Law sells the crap. He is about 400lbs and when he wants to lose weight, he just uses some crap, drops 20-30lbs, then gains it right back.

I just want to tell him to "just walk man, quit eating bacon."

I'm guessing AdvoCare will start to die out soon.  They had to (chose to?) give up the MLM part of the company after talks with the FTC.  All the people who built their pyramid empire by recruiting others will no longer get earnings from those people.  They will only get the earnings from what they can sell for themselves, which, for most MLM participants, isn't much, if anything at all.

In looking up some links for the AdvoCare issue, I found some reading material for today (looks like he's done a series of anti-MLM posts)...  https://www.lazymanandmoney.com/advocare-forced-by-ftc-to-end-its-scam/

Also found a sad, pro-MLM website, questioning everything about it, so many people defending the model.  Including this comment (which was not the worst, by any means, it just shows how much they've been brainwashed).

Quote
Why would you put blood, sweat and tears into training a distributor just to have that distributor now leave your group and go out capture market share from you using what you have given them.

We all need to fight back with all that is in us against government officials that have no idea how to build a viable group of distributors to move product and award the person who built it.

Real businesses try to avoid over-saturation.  They don't flood their local market by recruiting people to do the exact same job they do, selling the exact same stuff they do, in the exact same location they do, for the exact same actual CEO.  They (usually) want every business to be able to succeed in every location.  They don't build a bunch of the same stores on the same street and spout on about how this one store is succeeding, so yours can too, while ignoring the fact that all the other stores on that street are failing, and giving the succeeding store most of their profits, is the only real reason the star store is doing well.

TheGrimSqueaker

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2200
  • Location: A desert wasteland, where none but the weird survive
  • www.theliveinlandlord.com
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1249 on: August 08, 2019, 02:25:11 PM »
Real businesses try to avoid over-saturation.  They don't flood their local market by recruiting people to do the exact same job they do, selling the exact same stuff they do, in the exact same location they do, for the exact same actual CEO.  They (usually) want every business to be able to succeed in every location.  They don't build a bunch of the same stores on the same street and spout on about how this one store is succeeding, so yours can too, while ignoring the fact that all the other stores on that street are failing, and giving the succeeding store most of their profits, is the only real reason the star store is doing well.

That's also a key thing to look for in terms of franchise businesses, if you're ever in the market for one as part of a FI strategy. One of the guarantees that a franchise owner gets is that he or she will be the only franchisee within a specific radius. This introduces a "cost to exchange" that deters the customer from deciding to shop at another location instead. The better the franchise, the wider the radius. Subway, for example, is notorious for allowing new franchisees to set up shop close enough to an existing franchise to interfere with the first franchisee's business. Of course even a sizable exclusivity radius in a franchise agreement doesn't mean someone else won't build a nearly-identical business next door. I do see that some retail and commercial landlords try to take it into account... mall food courts come to mind. But the MLM model of sales, with people recruiting their own competition, flies right in the face of the non-compete principle.