Author Topic: No, I won't buy into your MLM  (Read 489327 times)

dandarc

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4435
  • Age: 38
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1450 on: March 29, 2021, 03:29:53 PM »
Well, lost a decade-long friendship (dude was in our wedding, we went on the cruise they decided on for theirs - I really hope this conflict doesn't completely kill our wives friendship) because as it turns out, he went and joined a fucking crypto-MLM scheme. I doubt he realizes what is happening yet, but when I was hearing about these things in 2018, he was neck deep trying to make an expensive gaming hobby profitable via what I would characterize as the unofficial "Twitch Amazon Prime Subscription" MLM scheme that was all the rage back then.

Basically out of nowhere this guy wants to talk about "stocks". Fun fact - reddit calls crypto currency and literally anything that you can trade easily "stocks". Original plan was to be day-trading crypto, appears that hasn't worked out and switched to mining (notably chose a mining pool that features a network-marketing referral structure . . .). Sudden change in language - guy is pretty much gone to this particular MLM cult now.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2021, 04:21:38 PM by dandarc »

DadJokes

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1887
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1451 on: April 22, 2021, 06:46:51 AM »
We may have inadvertently given business to an MLM.

My wife and I have both been wanting to get into better shape, and one of my wife's best friends has lost a lot of weight in the last year using a program called Beach Body. She let us use her login for the app, so that we can get the exercise videos for free. She also is letting us get pre-workout and recovery at her cost.

I had no idea that it was an MLM until another of my wife's co-workers offered her a deal on the program (not knowing that we're using the program for a lot cheaper through the friend). Then I started to do a little bit of research into the program and discovered that it's an MLM that's been around a while.

Granted, the friend is clearly not trying to make money off of us or recruit my wife to start selling the product. The product (app with different workouts & pre/post-workout) have given us good results, but I feel a bit uneasy about giving any money to an MLM. I think that once I finish the current batch of pre-workout and recovery, that I'll just get stuff at Wal-Mart instead.

Apples

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1068
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1452 on: April 27, 2021, 11:08:19 AM »
@DadJokes Beach Body is the least MLM-y of the MLM's, though it's true that it is one.  The MLM side is mostly the supplements and drinks and such.  The workouts truly are good workouts, and I think they're available to purchase directly through the website rather than needing to sign up through someone "selling" them.  But I have had some friends and neighbors join, become "coaches", and start doing all the social media posts on how great it is, motivational/inspirational quotes on pretty pictures, workout pics, etc.  The enthusiasm usually lasts less than 18 months.  After that they may still participate, but they stop posting about it so much.

mm1970

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8955
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1453 on: April 27, 2021, 04:03:25 PM »
We may have inadvertently given business to an MLM.

My wife and I have both been wanting to get into better shape, and one of my wife's best friends has lost a lot of weight in the last year using a program called Beach Body. She let us use her login for the app, so that we can get the exercise videos for free. She also is letting us get pre-workout and recovery at her cost.

I had no idea that it was an MLM until another of my wife's co-workers offered her a deal on the program (not knowing that we're using the program for a lot cheaper through the friend). Then I started to do a little bit of research into the program and discovered that it's an MLM that's been around a while.

Granted, the friend is clearly not trying to make money off of us or recruit my wife to start selling the product. The product (app with different workouts & pre/post-workout) have given us good results, but I feel a bit uneasy about giving any money to an MLM. I think that once I finish the current batch of pre-workout and recovery, that I'll just get stuff at Wal-Mart instead.
Beachbody is surely an MLM.  I think it's gotten a little LESS MLM-y since Beachbody on Demand, though.

I started using the workouts (back when they were DVDs), and became a "discount coach" for the discounts.  I really liked Shakeology.  But, it's expensive and then it started disagreeing with my digestion.  Then they came out with the streaming service.

After the streaming service ($99/year), there was no reason to be a coach anymore.  I wasn't using any of the products (pre workout and recovery).  I love trying all the workouts - DH and I have done significant portions (if not the full program) of P90X, LIIFT4, 21 day fix, Hammer and Chisel, PiYo, and MBF.  One way that BB makes money is to charge for "early access" for new workouts.  So, a new program comes out, and you pay for it.  But in 6 months it's free.  Do you need to pay for it to get it 6 months early?  Sometimes, the answer is yes if it really appeals to you.  Otherwise, it's almost exclusively COACHES who are paying for it, and encouraging others to sign up with them, and in the meantime selling them preworkout or recovery or whatever.

I can't imagine that it's much of a money maker anymore.  I used to know quite a lot of coaches (I do live in So Cal), and several of them made actual money at it, but a LOT of the money comes from building a "downline".  With the release of BOD, people just don't need to have a coach to get access to the workouts.  I imagine most people just do what we do.  At least, I haven't seen many posts of earning "free" vacations lately, and not just because of COVID.

I mean, I can't even bring myself to buy their gear.  I've done some of the workouts from 80 day obsession, which requires sliders.  You know, the sliders, if I buy them through BB and a friend, were close to $30. On Amazon?  $11.  Sorry.

DirtDiva

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 252
  • Age: 56
  • Location: The pale blue dot
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1454 on: April 30, 2021, 11:26:44 PM »
Iíve been invited via FAceboom THREE times to some make-up party being thrown by hubsís cousin.  She posted a picture of her face all made up complete with exclamations of how much she loves this stuff; kinda looked like a ďpainted ladyĒ to me. Whatever, but stop shoving it down my throat.

Did I mention that I havenít worn makeup for at least 5 years, and I donít plan to start now?

PoutineLover

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1413
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1455 on: May 20, 2021, 09:17:44 AM »
I've just found out about a new one - Experior Financial. Apparently they were founded in Canada and have now expanded to 18 states. Their agents sell insurance and other investments through network marketing. Why is it that every MLM goes out of their way to say that they are not an MLM, but then operates exactly like an MLM?

A friend of mine who is already into beachbody is thinking of getting into this one too, and I listened to the presentation with her in the hopes that if I knew more about it, I could convince her not to join. There are registration fees, exam fees, insurance fees, and monthly fees to use the program that add up to at least 90 bucks a month, and you only get paid based on commission from sales and the sales of the agents operating on your team. But you are a "business owner".

I feel like these companies prey on people who are already bad with money, and make their financial situation even worse. Most people don't need the kind of insurance they are selling, but it appeals to their worries and fears. The investments have really high fees and trailing commissions, so again, not a good deal for the person investing. They preach "financial education and empowerment" but they're really offering indebted people very expensive products and investments when they could be teaching them about index funds, but obviously that wouldn't make them any money.

Anyway, hope I can convince my friend it's a bad idea to join.. wish me luck. I'm all for financial education, but not like this bullshit.

dandarc

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4435
  • Age: 38
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1456 on: May 20, 2021, 01:19:38 PM »
Good luck!

ohsnap

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 301
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1457 on: May 20, 2021, 01:37:58 PM »
@DadJokes... But I have had some friends and neighbors join, become "coaches", and start doing all the social media posts on how great it is, motivational/inspirational quotes on pretty pictures, workout pics, etc....

One of my closest friends became a "coach" for a different wellness MLM a few months ago. Not beach body - and I actually don't know the name of it because although she posts about it ALL.THE.TIME on social media, she never says what it is.  Just inspirational posts about her success & her clients' successes, and IF YOU ARE READY TO CHANGE, MESSAGE ME!  Typically when someone I know starts doing this, I unfriend them or at least hide them from my feed.  But this is a good friend. I'm at a loss. 

jeromedawg

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 4089
  • Location: Orange County, CA
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1458 on: May 26, 2021, 10:22:49 AM »
I have an 'acquaintance' who recently started a monetized fishing channel on Youtube. He goes out often and it's an enviable position to be in. Well, it turns out his wife is a big time MLMer selling essential oils - I thought I saw that she was diamond level or something like that so she's bringing home the $$$. I think most of her clientele/returning customer base began from the social network they have primarily through their church, so she must have milked that cow hard and her "essential oil consultancy" spread like wildfire from there (good luck to any of her close friends who would dare think to enter the "business" and step on her toes lol). Using similar tactics as his wife (but advertising "like & subscribe" on Facebook and in a big FB fishing group) the guy is now gaining tons of traction with his channel and will probably be making a fair amount of money off it soon enough. And no, I'm not going to link his Youtube channel...because I'm going to start one myself hopefully and don't want to shoot myself in the foot LOL - click like and subscribe when I start it!jk
Anyway, it must be nice having tons of free time to spin up a monetized Youtube channel for your hobby because your wife made out well for you, exploiting all your friends. To be clear, I'm not saying or implying that starting a Youtube channel is like MLM. There's a lot of work that needs to go into it for it (editing videos) to be a success. But it's one of those things that not many people can successfully do as a side-hustle/side-gig. On top of that, some people resort to using shameless tactics to quickly increase their viewership (like relentlessly plugging the channel ALL OVER Facebook and elsewhere - not just in posts but commenting in threads, and self-promoting aggressively). It's the aggressive self-promotion that I don't like... it's my opinion that if you start a channel, do it because you love it AND allow the growth to be organic - plug where you have the opportunity but don't get greedy/obsessive/aggressive about doing so.

Years ago, I had a financial planner uncomfortably pressure me, in person after an initial consulting session, to cough up a list of potential clients to refer for her to cold-call (I was young, stupid and didn't know any better and caved in...) - this felt MLMish as well.

My wife told me about this Korean lady who would bother her parents at their restaurant and sell them crap they didn't need (some crappy under sink water filtration unit, a super overpriced bidet, etc). Forgot the name of this company but she told me every time the lady would step foot in the restaurant she would stare her down and make the lady feel super uncomfortable. The visits became less and less, at least while my wife was there. I think my in-laws have halted most of that by now since selling the restaurant but that was another example of old school MLM they were fooled by.

I have very little respect for these kinds of people.

We have other friends who do MLM on a smaller scale with books (forget the name) and Norwex but they don't push hard enough to become platinum diamond sellers - I'm fine with them because I can tell they got into it and realized how shady it felt to essentially exploit your friends selling them nominal products for tons of money, so they don't really push anything on anyone.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2021, 10:44:30 AM by jeromedawg »

Bloop Bloop Reloaded

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 739
  • Location: Australia
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1459 on: May 27, 2021, 09:53:24 PM »
Most you tubers and MLMers don't earn as much as they want you to believe. That's part of the schtick - pretending to be successful.

If they really were successful they'd quit the job once they raked in the cash.

The phoney low-tier Mercedes that the MLM crowd use just fortify my belief that they are struggling, income-wise. No one with a genuinely high income is going to brag about leasing a CLA Mercedes.

kite

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 715
Re: No, I won't buy into your MLM
« Reply #1460 on: June 01, 2021, 01:55:56 PM »
@DadJokes... But I have had some friends and neighbors join, become "coaches", and start doing all the social media posts on how great it is, motivational/inspirational quotes on pretty pictures, workout pics, etc....

One of my closest friends became a "coach" for a different wellness MLM a few months ago. Not beach body - and I actually don't know the name of it because although she posts about it ALL.THE.TIME on social media, she never says what it is.  Just inspirational posts about her success & her clients' successes, and IF YOU ARE READY TO CHANGE, MESSAGE ME!  Typically when someone I know starts doing this, I unfriend them or at least hide them from my feed.  But this is a good friend. I'm at a loss.

I've got an in-law doing this.  She's hawking Optavia (the old Medifast) and her before & after pic's do look stunning.  They keep the name of the program off of social media, referring to it as "Health & Wellness" but it's been easy to deduce what they were selling.