Author Topic: No American Mustaches in Ireland  (Read 13255 times)

nobodyspecial

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Re: No American Mustaches in Ireland
« Reply #50 on: February 22, 2016, 03:12:22 PM »
Not sure, but can (for example) a French person residing in Germany who becomes homeless be asked/forced to return to France, rather than being homeless?
No, you are in general allowed the same rights and benefits as a citizen.
There are rules about residence / substantive presence - so if you become unemployed in the UK you can't get on the first plane to say Denmark to get higher benefits - but generally you have to be treated in the same way as natives.

daverobev

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Re: No American Mustaches in Ireland
« Reply #51 on: February 23, 2016, 02:37:17 AM »
Not sure, but can (for example) a French person residing in Germany who becomes homeless be asked/forced to return to France, rather than being homeless?
No, you are in general allowed the same rights and benefits as a citizen.
There are rules about residence / substantive presence - so if you become unemployed in the UK you can't get on the first plane to say Denmark to get higher benefits - but generally you have to be treated in the same way as natives.

Ok - and isn't that an EU thing? How come Ireland is allowed to be different?

I know the UK is lobbying for for restrictions on benefits for new migrants. Seems fair to me - you can't turn up somewhere and expect to be given, well, anything (real refugees aside).

Doubleh

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Re: No American Mustaches in Ireland
« Reply #52 on: February 23, 2016, 03:06:42 AM »
As far as the ability of Ireland to restrict the right of eu citizens to live there, this is only based on information from the Irish government website. So they can say whatever they like, but if it is in contravention of eu law, primarily the treaty of Rome which provides for free movement of goods, services, and people within the Union, they would not be able to enforce it.

The website of the EU, Europa.eu says:

If you are a pensioner you may live in any EU country if you have:

comprehensive health insurance cover there
sufficient income (from any source) to live without needing income support.

Note that income can be from any source and only seems to require that you do not need to claim income support from the host country. So while Ireland may be able to specify a hard and fast amount required for non eu nationals, I suspect for any eu citizen you should be pretty much fine as long as you're not trying to claim any state benefits.

There's also the option of being self employed, I haven't looked into what exactly that requires but the couple mentioned in the op might want to look at that route, maybe some freelancing or a blog could help to tick the necessary boxes.

As to the situation of Americans finding it more restrictive to live in Ireland than was formerly the case I do deplore that and generally feel anyone should be able to live wherever they like provided they obey the law and are not a burden on the state. But it seems pretty hypocritical to get upset about Ireland withdrawing a courtesy when the U.S. offers nothing similar to foreign citizens wishing to live there legally.