Author Topic: New York fooled by con artist  (Read 4264 times)

Warlord1986

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New York fooled by con artist
« on: May 30, 2018, 02:35:29 PM »
https://www.thecut.com/2018/05/how-anna-delvey-tricked-new-york.html

My mind is boggled by both the excess and the thieving.

Travis

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #1 on: May 30, 2018, 04:15:33 PM »
If I'm understanding the game, she cashed a ton of fake checks before they bounced and that's where her seed money came from?

The lesson I'm drawing from this article seems to be: if you can look and act rich in NYC, then a promise is all you need to get by.  The number of times her marks failed a spot check is insane.
« Last Edit: May 30, 2018, 04:18:23 PM by Travis »

Warlord1986

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #2 on: May 31, 2018, 06:30:58 AM »
New Yorkers must be really gullible. Damn.

talltexan

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #3 on: May 31, 2018, 07:32:51 AM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

BigRed

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #4 on: May 31, 2018, 08:53:41 AM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose. 

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #5 on: May 31, 2018, 08:59:06 AM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

MgoSam

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #6 on: May 31, 2018, 09:17:31 AM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

Yup, I read an article where she is being interviewed after being incarcerated and she doesn't sound at all remorseful. Instead she asks why her friends haven't bailed her out. She also mentions how others, like the Kardashians, have created massive wealth from nothing.

Completely self-absorbed narcissistic personality. I have no problems believing that she made it that far in NYC.

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #7 on: May 31, 2018, 12:21:27 PM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

Yup, I read an article where she is being interviewed after being incarcerated and she doesn't sound at all remorseful. Instead she asks why her friends haven't bailed her out. She also mentions how others, like the Kardashians, have created massive wealth from nothing.

Completely self-absorbed narcissistic personality. I have no problems believing that she made it that far in NYC.

She appears to really, truly, honestly believe that making a bunch of mouth noises and consuming high-cost luxuries generates actual value for other humans. It doesn't. The people who make their money from hype, and by that I mean celebrities who are famous for being famous and who have companies paying them loads of money for endorsements, have something to offer in exchange: other people's attention. As long as someone cares about such-and-such a celebrity family and is willing to tune in, they have something to sell. This con artist had nothing to sell and nothing to provide. All she was interested in doing was taking.

It always comes as a surprise when people get tired of being taken from by an entitled brat, and turn off the tap.

Cromacster

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #8 on: May 31, 2018, 12:29:11 PM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

Yup, I read an article where she is being interviewed after being incarcerated and she doesn't sound at all remorseful. Instead she asks why her friends haven't bailed her out. She also mentions how others, like the Kardashians, have created massive wealth from nothing.

Completely self-absorbed narcissistic personality. I have no problems believing that she made it that far in NYC.

She appears to really, truly, honestly believe that making a bunch of mouth noises and consuming high-cost luxuries generates actual value for other humans. It doesn't. The people who make their money from hype, and by that I mean celebrities who are famous for being famous and who have companies paying them loads of money for endorsements, have something to offer in exchange: other people's attention. As long as someone cares about such-and-such a celebrity family and is willing to tune in, they have something to sell. This con artist had nothing to sell and nothing to provide. All she was interested in doing was taking.

It always comes as a surprise when people get tired of being taken from by an entitled brat, and turn off the tap.

I'm not even sure she is an entitled brat.  From the story she's a complete sociopath.

FIRE@50

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #9 on: May 31, 2018, 12:39:08 PM »
This story reminded me of something I recently watched on Netflix called, My Friend Rockefeller. It was pretty good.

Makes me wonder how many other people like this are lurking around America. There is probably enough excess money floating around to support thousands of people like this without putting a dent in anyone's(victim's) lifestyle.

Oh, Sour Grapes is similar too. This guy was going through a lot of trouble to fake vintage wines just to hangout with rich people.

Travis

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #10 on: May 31, 2018, 12:45:28 PM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

Yup, I read an article where she is being interviewed after being incarcerated and she doesn't sound at all remorseful. Instead she asks why her friends haven't bailed her out. She also mentions how others, like the Kardashians, have created massive wealth from nothing.

Completely self-absorbed narcissistic personality. I have no problems believing that she made it that far in NYC.

She appears to really, truly, honestly believe that making a bunch of mouth noises and consuming high-cost luxuries generates actual value for other humans. It doesn't. The people who make their money from hype, and by that I mean celebrities who are famous for being famous and who have companies paying them loads of money for endorsements, have something to offer in exchange: other people's attention. As long as someone cares about such-and-such a celebrity family and is willing to tune in, they have something to sell. This con artist had nothing to sell and nothing to provide. All she was interested in doing was taking.

It always comes as a surprise when people get tired of being taken from by an entitled brat, and turn off the tap.

I'm not even sure she is an entitled brat.  From the story she's a complete sociopath.

One of the article commenters noted how from behind bars her interest piqued at living with identity thieves.  If she truly believes what she's saying, world beware when she gets out because she's going to do it again with another set of skills.

SweetRedWine

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #11 on: May 31, 2018, 12:52:05 PM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

From the article it didn't sound like the concierge friend was out much of anything.  She got paid back when she had to cover a dinner out one time.  However, the trainer friend got stuck with a 60K hotel bill in Morocco, which was more than her yearly income.  Ouch doesn't cover it.

Warlord1986

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #12 on: June 01, 2018, 06:02:56 AM »
The concierge chick sounded like she admired the sociopath. "I thought that was a boss move."

GuitarStv

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #13 on: June 01, 2018, 07:45:04 AM »
The concierge chick sounded like she admired the sociopath. "I thought that was a boss move."

It does seem rather presidential.

Dicey

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #14 on: June 01, 2018, 08:16:22 AM »
Wow.

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #15 on: June 01, 2018, 09:21:50 AM »
The concierge chick sounded like she admired the sociopath. "I thought that was a boss move."

Indeed: she's in an environment where acting like an entitled brat is associated with wealth and power. People show their power and wealth by abusing it. I'd call that a pretty toxic environment, but large numbers of human beings like it and want more of it.

bacchi

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2018, 09:22:54 AM »
Quote from: newyorkmagazine
“Everyone is your best friend, and you don’t know a thing about anyone.”

Ha. Some good lines in there.

Sadly, she'll serve a few years, get out, and do it all again.

wbranch

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2018, 10:40:47 AM »
A couple years ago in the small midwest town (15k people) we used to live in a there was a friendly guy that moved in and was starting a small business. Seemed like a nice guy, but ended up getting caught early because he wrote a bad check to become a chamber of commerce member. They googled his name and found stories from multiple states of various scams. They really should have warned businesses in town sooner, but he ended up writing a couple more bad checks before others got wind of it. We knew one of his "friends" that was convinced he was getting a bad deal and was just trying to start over. The local newspaper wrote a nice article about one of his businesses as well.

whitewaterchica

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2018, 02:51:44 PM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

From the article it didn't sound like the concierge friend was out much of anything.  She got paid back when she had to cover a dinner out one time.  However, the trainer friend got stuck with a 60K hotel bill in Morocco, which was more than her yearly income.  Ouch doesn't cover it.

It wasn't the trainer who got stuck with the $60k+ bill, it was Rachel Williams, a photo editor, who remained on the trip with Anna after the trainer headed back to NYC early. "Apparently, after the trainer returned to New York, the credit card Anna had used to book the hotel was found to be nonfunctional, and when Anna was unable to produce a new form of payment and a pair of threatening goons appeared in the doorway, the photo editor was forced to put the balance — $62,000, more than she was paid in a year — on the Amex she sometimes used for work expenses. Anna had promised her a wire transfer, but a month later, all Rachel received was $5,000, and her excuses had turned “Kafkaesque.”"

I'm guessing the trainer considers the bout of food poisoning that caused her to return home early one of the best things that's ever happened to her. I found the article fascinating. Anna is a sociopath through and through.

Spiffsome

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #19 on: June 02, 2018, 06:22:55 PM »
Wow. Somebody pulled a real-life Vanity Fair. I agree with the poster that said she's going to get out, and she's going to do it again.

Does youth help the scam? Does she have a natural expiry date to her scamming, or does the nature of the scam just change with age?

MissNancyPryor

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #20 on: June 02, 2018, 06:48:17 PM »
People are pretty easily fooled by appearances.  There is a family owned store here in the region that got scammed out of a couple of Rolex watches.  A woman walked in looking the part with high end clothes and purse.  Her credit card was troublesome with the high dollar transaction but the sales clerk was convinced by the scammer that it was just fine and they did some kind of an override. 

It was all fake of course, the identity was a fraud.  Poor store, right? 

I didn't shed a tear for them.  I had been in that exact store not long before trying to get a specific kind of mother's ring wearing my engineer's reasonable garb and shoes with my small leather backpack purse.  Got a whole lot of down-the-nose looks and indifferent service when I couldn't pinpoint something I liked and they didn't suggest a custom option which I know they do offer and which they advertise heavily.  I didn't look the part I guess, I definitely had the feeling from the staff that I was just not up to par.  It was a gross feeling.   

And yet, I have money, a lot of it.  I don't flash it around or drop $100 bills on countertops though.  Millionaire next door here.   

I took my business elsewhere and got a lovely customized ring for way too much money, paid cash, and will happily wear it till I die.  It is a single monolithic ring that looks like a stacked set of bands, each having my daughter's birthstones intermingled with diamonds.  It is designed to be cut apart after my death with each daughter taking what will then become a single band for each.  Cool!

I was half tempted to write the family owned store and tell them about my experience as it was so closely juxtaposed to the theft.  Sort of a, "that is what you get when you disregard plain looking actual millionaires in favor of well dressed thieves" but in kinder tones and politeness.  Didn't bother, there just didn't seem to be any way to pull off that verbal gymnastics and I was just pissed anyway.       

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #21 on: June 03, 2018, 01:09:56 AM »
People are pretty easily fooled by appearances.  There is a family owned store here in the region that got scammed out of a couple of Rolex watches.  A woman walked in looking the part with high end clothes and purse.  Her credit card was troublesome with the high dollar transaction but the sales clerk was convinced by the scammer that it was just fine and they did some kind of an override. 

It was all fake of course, the identity was a fraud.  Poor store, right? 

I didn't shed a tear for them.  I had been in that exact store not long before trying to get a specific kind of mother's ring wearing my engineer's reasonable garb and shoes with my small leather backpack purse.  Got a whole lot of down-the-nose looks and indifferent service when I couldn't pinpoint something I liked and they didn't suggest a custom option which I know they do offer and which they advertise heavily.  I didn't look the part I guess, I definitely had the feeling from the staff that I was just not up to par.  It was a gross feeling.   

And yet, I have money, a lot of it.  I don't flash it around or drop $100 bills on countertops though.  Millionaire next door here.   

I took my business elsewhere and got a lovely customized ring for way too much money, paid cash, and will happily wear it till I die.  It is a single monolithic ring that looks like a stacked set of bands, each having my daughter's birthstones intermingled with diamonds.  It is designed to be cut apart after my death with each daughter taking what will then become a single band for each.  Cool!

I was half tempted to write the family owned store and tell them about my experience as it was so closely juxtaposed to the theft.  Sort of a, "that is what you get when you disregard plain looking actual millionaires in favor of well dressed thieves" but in kinder tones and politeness.  Didn't bother, there just didn't seem to be any way to pull off that verbal gymnastics and I was just pissed anyway.     

If you have that kind of trouble again, hit me up: verbal gymnastics are my thing. I can maintain a kind, polite tone while verbally eviscerating someone.

MrUpwardlyMobile

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #22 on: June 03, 2018, 06:04:31 AM »
It is all a shell game. You use small loans/favors from friends to produce the very small amounts of money that justify bigger loans, then you use the bigger loans to leverage the purchase of social capital, the connections and opportunities that are available to the wealthy and connected. Social capital can turn into real connections that produce lucrative opportunities. Make enough high-risk bets, and one of them will pay off.

It also sounds extraordinarily stressful and risky.

But it isn't stressful if you have a high risk tolerance, and don't actually have anything to lose.

Or if you don't really care about the consequences to other people.

None of this creature's "friends" are going to get their money back, and some of the victims aren't myopic, self-absorbed trust fund babies (who still probably don't deserve to be stolen from). A hotel concierge, for example, doesn't make enough to pay off the debt incurred on this creature's behalf. Nor do most of the trade and professional contractors who were left holding the bag for her bogus ventures.

Yup, I read an article where she is being interviewed after being incarcerated and she doesn't sound at all remorseful. Instead she asks why her friends haven't bailed her out. She also mentions how others, like the Kardashians, have created massive wealth from nothing.

Completely self-absorbed narcissistic personality. I have no problems believing that she made it that far in NYC.

She appears to really, truly, honestly believe that making a bunch of mouth noises and consuming high-cost luxuries generates actual value for other humans. It doesn't. The people who make their money from hype, and by that I mean celebrities who are famous for being famous and who have companies paying them loads of money for endorsements, have something to offer in exchange: other people's attention. As long as someone cares about such-and-such a celebrity family and is willing to tune in, they have something to sell. This con artist had nothing to sell and nothing to provide. All she was interested in doing was taking.

It always comes as a surprise when people get tired of being taken from by an entitled brat, and turn off the tap.

I'm not even sure she is an entitled brat.  From the story she's a complete sociopath.

A huge amount of the New York City populace could be described in such a manner.

Freedomin5

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #23 on: June 03, 2018, 08:12:30 AM »
It’s almost like she’s delusional. The forensic psychologist at the penitentiary must be having a ball. It’s kind of fascinating.

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #24 on: June 03, 2018, 08:41:52 AM »
It’s almost like she’s delusional. The forensic psychologist at the penitentiary must be having a ball. It’s kind of fascinating.

Unless of course she's chiseling money from the staff.

I once read a book called "Games Criminals Play" that was utterly diabolical.

meghan88

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2018, 04:28:51 PM »
Merriam-Webster needs to include her photo for the definition of "sociopath".  Though there's a long list of other deserving candidates.

talltexan

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2018, 08:30:27 AM »
It’s almost like she’s delusional. The forensic psychologist at the penitentiary must be having a ball. It’s kind of fascinating.

Unless of course she's chiseling money from the staff.

I once read a book called "Games Criminals Play" that was utterly diabolical.

Part of the trick is to con someone out of slightly less money than the trouble it will create for them to try to expose you as a fraud.

meghan88

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2018, 09:49:13 AM »
It’s almost like she’s delusional. The forensic psychologist at the penitentiary must be having a ball. It’s kind of fascinating.

Unless of course she's chiseling money from the staff.

I once read a book called "Games Criminals Play" that was utterly diabolical.

Part of the trick is to con someone out of slightly less money than the trouble it will create for them to try to expose you as a fraud.
Or, someone who would be too embarrassed to report it.

alanB

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #28 on: June 04, 2018, 12:20:49 PM »
Loved this quote:
Quote
“If I really wanted the money, I would have better and faster ways to get some,” she groused. “Resilience is hard to come by, but not capital.”
Great sentiment, horrible execution. 

Dabnasty

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Re: New York fooled by con artist
« Reply #29 on: June 04, 2018, 12:30:21 PM »
Loved this quote:
Quote
“If I really wanted the money, I would have better and faster ways to get some,” she groused. “Resilience is hard to come by, but not capital.”
Great sentiment, horrible execution.

Ya, capital is easy to come by... when you lie, cheat, and steal from everyone who trusts you. If you want to use that quote you don't need to credit her, just steal it :)