Author Topic: McMansion tents  (Read 9928 times)

FINate

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McMansion tents
« on: May 21, 2016, 10:17:42 AM »
This has started started popping up in my social media: https://www.podtents.com - The amazing new social camping experience. The commonly pictured configuration runs around $3k-$4k total, depending on upgrades and accessories.

Because I guess when you're camping everyone needs their own room? And heaven forbid you have to go outside in the sun and fresh air to visit your neighbor! Instead, you get to hunch over to cross in a hot connecting tunnel. Great fun! You can pretend you're working in a coal mine!

All this money for something that won't even fit in most campsites :)

meg_shannon

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #1 on: May 21, 2016, 10:24:52 AM »
Wow! We're a three person family, and I'm considering purchasing a four person tent for a bit of extra room. Growing up we used a three person tent for three people, and there wasn't any room for anything other than our sleeping bags/bodies.

rothnroll

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #2 on: May 21, 2016, 10:26:36 AM »
I don't understand why they need to link together? Why hang out in a bunch of connected tents?
Why not hang out... outside?

kudy

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #3 on: May 21, 2016, 10:34:42 AM »
I don't understand why they need to link together? Why hang out in a bunch of connected tents?
Why not hang out... outside?

What if it rains?!

TheDude

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #4 on: May 21, 2016, 10:47:33 AM »
I mean I guess if that's your main shelter its ok

forummm

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #5 on: May 21, 2016, 11:20:49 AM »
If the tent sleeps 8 (in 4 separate rooms in a single tent)--do you really need 5 or 10 tents?

JAYSLOL

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2016, 11:28:13 AM »
It actually looks kind of awesome, like living in the international space station or something.  I mean, its still a waste of money, but honestly at least its better than using a $60k F350 to haul a $100k travel trailer around to "camp" in $100 a night full-service RV resorts spaces. 

I'll keep camping the way we always do, with a 4-man tent, 2 camp chairs and an old colman camp stove all of which i got for free out of an abandoned storage locker i cleaned out. 

FINate

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2016, 11:42:32 AM »
It actually looks kind of awesome, like living in the international space station or something.  I mean, its still a waste of money, but honestly at least its better than using a $60k F350 to haul a $100k travel trailer around to "camp" in $100 a night full-service RV resorts spaces. 

I'll keep camping the way we always do, with a 4-man tent, 2 camp chairs and an old colman camp stove all of which i got for free out of an abandoned storage locker i cleaned out.

The $100k+ trailers are typically fifth wheels. Travel trailers usually run in the $15k-$30k range and need much less towing capability, unless it's an Airstream which are overpriced IMO. At least an RV has a fridge/freezer, stove, oven, bathroom, sink, water heater, and so on. And one can easily dry camp at cheap forest service or BLM sites.

Lagom

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2016, 11:58:55 AM »
It actually looks kind of awesome, like living in the international space station or something.  I mean, its still a waste of money, but honestly at least its better than using a $60k F350 to haul a $100k travel trailer around to "camp" in $100 a night full-service RV resorts spaces. 

I'll keep camping the way we always do, with a 4-man tent, 2 camp chairs and an old colman camp stove all of which i got for free out of an abandoned storage locker i cleaned out.

The $100k+ trailers are typically fifth wheels. Travel trailers usually run in the $15k-$30k range and need much less towing capability, unless it's an Airstream which are overpriced IMO. At least an RV has a fridge/freezer, stove, oven, bathroom, sink, water heater, and so on. And one can easily dry camp at cheap forest service or BLM sites.

I still think it's a good point. I used to want to go the travel trailer or possibly van conversion route, until I realized that I could buy the fanciest camping gear I wanted and still come out ahead without sacrificing much if anything in the way of comfort and amenities.

FINate

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2016, 01:14:43 PM »
It actually looks kind of awesome, like living in the international space station or something.  I mean, its still a waste of money, but honestly at least its better than using a $60k F350 to haul a $100k travel trailer around to "camp" in $100 a night full-service RV resorts spaces. 

I'll keep camping the way we always do, with a 4-man tent, 2 camp chairs and an old colman camp stove all of which i got for free out of an abandoned storage locker i cleaned out.

The $100k+ trailers are typically fifth wheels. Travel trailers usually run in the $15k-$30k range and need much less towing capability, unless it's an Airstream which are overpriced IMO. At least an RV has a fridge/freezer, stove, oven, bathroom, sink, water heater, and so on. And one can easily dry camp at cheap forest service or BLM sites.

I still think it's a good point. I used to want to go the travel trailer or possibly van conversion route, until I realized that I could buy the fanciest camping gear I wanted and still come out ahead without sacrificing much if anything in the way of comfort and amenities.

I hear you. My preference is still backpacking in somewhere - love the vigorous exercise and lack of crowds. However, DW is not the camping type and we have young kids, so I realized that a small RV is the only way we are getting out as a family for now. We're FIRE and paid cash, so consider it one of our few luxuries that we actually have a fair amount of time to use.

Tjat

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #10 on: May 21, 2016, 01:16:28 PM »

I still think it's a good point. I used to want to go the travel trailer or possibly van conversion route, until I realized that I could buy the fanciest camping gear I wanted and still come out ahead without sacrificing much if anything in the way of comfort and amenities.

And you don't have to let the fancy camping gears sit out in your yard the other 330+ days of the year :)


ETA: I think my favorite product is the "sleeping pod," which is a separate tent you can buy to go inside the master POD so you can sleep in more privacy. https://www.podtents.com/shop/pod-tent-inner/?v=7516fd43adaa
« Last Edit: May 21, 2016, 01:18:54 PM by Tjat »

FINate

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #11 on: May 21, 2016, 01:32:41 PM »
Also, if you're going to spend that kind of scratch on a tent you can get something like this for half the price without all the silly tunnels, and you can put a freakin' wood burning stove in it.

human

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #12 on: May 21, 2016, 01:44:14 PM »
The 8 man version is pretty cheap. Quality 4 season tents are expensive. Check out Hilleberg tents if you want to choke. I'm a tarptent guy myself when it comes to 3 season and those are probably still considered expensive for this crowd.

FINate

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #13 on: May 21, 2016, 02:10:21 PM »
I don't think it's a 4 season tent though. At least I didn't find any indication of this on their site. You can get a standard 3 season 8 person tent for car camping for less than $150.

Making Cookies

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #14 on: May 21, 2016, 02:53:37 PM »
A black tent doesn't seem very wise here in the south... ;)

A friend's family is all into camping RV style. Their trailer was $2K and needed some repairs. Looks new now. Their tow vehicle is a $5K pickup truck.

We still tent camp as a family (two ancient tents) but as I get older, a larger tent and cots seem more appealing than when I was younger.

State park and national park campsites aren't expensive.

Edited: because the first 20 edits are never quite right.

MgoSam

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #15 on: May 21, 2016, 03:03:28 PM »
I've been interested in the AT post-FIRE, but would need to drastically up my knowledge and experience in backpacking. I have no idea how much all the equipment will cost for doing a thru hike.

human

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #16 on: May 21, 2016, 04:09:07 PM »
Check out whiteblaze and backpackinglight. I bought all fancy gear but I've seen people with real cheapo kit all over. A lot of people manage on cheap gear. The key in my mind is keeping all gear excluding water and food pretty low. 8-15 lbs is a good goal.

I once dreamt of doing the AT, I took three months off work and did a road trip to the canadian rockies, northern bc, yukon and alaska. This let me hike in some fantastic areas and I realized 6-7 days at a time is plenty for me. If you are fire I guess time isn't a problem but I didn't want my one time ling vacation spent on oneovercrowded trail. Something to think about.

Syonyk

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #17 on: May 21, 2016, 09:46:22 PM »
A black tent doesn't seem very wise here in the south... ;)

Literally at the bottom of the main page, a link to this: https://www.podtents.com/isnt-a-black-tent-hotter-inside/?v=7516fd43adaa

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #18 on: May 22, 2016, 05:54:09 AM »
Wow! We're a three person family, and I'm considering purchasing a four person tent for a bit of extra room. Growing up we used a three person tent for three people, and there wasn't any room for anything other than our sleeping bags/bodies.

We recently got this tent, which I certainly consider a McMansion by previous my tent standards (it's just two of us and a dog...)
http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000027941NP-Montana-8-Person-Tent/dp/B001TSCF96?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
It was on sale for $89.  We've found Coleman to be just great for Cadillac camping (I wouldn't use the brand for backpacking...) 

It's pretty amazing. My favorite feature is that the door is structured and hinged.  It's also flipping huge, so when it rains (and it always rains, me camping ends droughts, and has since childhood), we can sit and play cards on a table and chairs, not cramped in our sleeping bag.

aperture

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #19 on: May 22, 2016, 06:11:30 AM »
Wow! We're a three person family, and I'm considering purchasing a four person tent for a bit of extra room. Growing up we used a three person tent for three people, and there wasn't any room for anything other than our sleeping bags/bodies.

We recently got this tent, which I certainly consider a McMansion by previous my tent standards (it's just two of us and a dog...)
http://www.amazon.com/Coleman-2000027941NP-Montana-8-Person-Tent/dp/B001TSCF96?ie=UTF8&psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00
It was on sale for $89.  We've found Coleman to be just great for Cadillac camping (I wouldn't use the brand for backpacking...) 

It's pretty amazing. My favorite feature is that the door is structured and hinged.  It's also flipping huge, so when it rains (and it always rains, me camping ends droughts, and has since childhood), we can sit and play cards on a table and chairs, not cramped in our sleeping bag.

My wife and I were new to camping and borrowed a 30 year old tent from her uncle.  After five days at YNP and three more at GNP, it fell apart.  We stopped in a Walmart or similar in Calgary and picked up a cheap Coleman tent.  It was great, water-proof and lacked the mold-smell of her uncle's tent. We have camped year after year since then with various brands of tents, but I keep returning to cheap Coleman tents for all car-camping experiences. Now I have a 3-man four-season tent that I got at the Backcountry outlet for ~$200 and a giant Coleman for when it is more than me and the boy and the weather is good. 
-Ap
Camping pearl: Nothing is more dangerous to a tent than a boy playing inside with a dinosaur that has a pointy tail.  There - I saved you from a painful tent repair. 

zolotiyeruki

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #20 on: May 23, 2016, 08:34:38 AM »
Also, if you're going to spend that kind of scratch on a tent you can get something like this for half the price without all the silly tunnels, and you can put a freakin' wood burning stove in it.
Holy smokes, that's awesome!  And it's the same cost as just *one* of those silly room dividers from OP's tent!

MgoSam

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #21 on: May 23, 2016, 09:03:46 AM »
Check out whiteblaze and backpackinglight. I bought all fancy gear but I've seen people with real cheapo kit all over. A lot of people manage on cheap gear. The key in my mind is keeping all gear excluding water and food pretty low. 8-15 lbs is a good goal.

I once dreamt of doing the AT, I took three months off work and did a road trip to the canadian rockies, northern bc, yukon and alaska. This let me hike in some fantastic areas and I realized 6-7 days at a time is plenty for me. If you are fire I guess time isn't a problem but I didn't want my one time ling vacation spent on oneovercrowded trail. Something to think about.

Thanks! I don't know how seriously I would like to do the AT, I suspect that it was a pleasant thought that made me happy thinking about a while back. I think a shorter trip would be more my speed, but of course, who knows, maybe with experience I'll be interested in doing it.

FINate

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #22 on: May 23, 2016, 09:45:55 AM »
Check out whiteblaze and backpackinglight. I bought all fancy gear but I've seen people with real cheapo kit all over. A lot of people manage on cheap gear. The key in my mind is keeping all gear excluding water and food pretty low. 8-15 lbs is a good goal.

I once dreamt of doing the AT, I took three months off work and did a road trip to the canadian rockies, northern bc, yukon and alaska. This let me hike in some fantastic areas and I realized 6-7 days at a time is plenty for me. If you are fire I guess time isn't a problem but I didn't want my one time ling vacation spent on oneovercrowded trail. Something to think about.

Thanks! I don't know how seriously I would like to do the AT, I suspect that it was a pleasant thought that made me happy thinking about a while back. I think a shorter trip would be more my speed, but of course, who knows, maybe with experience I'll be interested in doing it.

Shorter trips are a great way to get started. If you can, go on a shorter trip with people who are experienced and ask for help getting prepared. Chances are they will have gear you can borrow which will keep costs down (you can also rent from places like REI). There's a ton of backpacking gear out there, much of it is unnecessary and/or gimmicky. Experienced backpackers will help you learn exactly what you need, or don't need as it were.

My mantra when I take people just starting out: Feet, Fitness, Fuel. Feet - make sure your footwear fits correctly with whatever socks you're wearing, and shoes should be correctly broken in. Don't buy brand new hiking boots the week before going out - you're better off going with an existing pair of light hikers that are already broken in. Fitness - don't expect to do a 10 mile hike carrying a 30-40 lbs pack over steep terrain without being in reasonably good shape. Get out on practice hikes (with a loaded pack), get cardio on your bike, build leg strength. You'll enjoy it a lot more if you don't feel like you're going to die. The heavier the pack the better shape you need to be in, so keep it as light as possible. Fuel - Make sure you have the right amount and type of food for the trip. Take in small amounts of food and water frequently while hiking, which also gives you an opportunity to rest your feet and address any hot spots. You don't want to bonk or get dehydrated, which is just miserable. Of course there are a bunch of other necessities to consider such as shelter, where/how to get water, and such. But if you go with experienced people they will be able to take charge of these things if you can take care of yourself.

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #23 on: May 23, 2016, 09:48:47 AM »
Check out whiteblaze and backpackinglight. I bought all fancy gear but I've seen people with real cheapo kit all over. A lot of people manage on cheap gear. The key in my mind is keeping all gear excluding water and food pretty low. 8-15 lbs is a good goal.

I once dreamt of doing the AT, I took three months off work and did a road trip to the canadian rockies, northern bc, yukon and alaska. This let me hike in some fantastic areas and I realized 6-7 days at a time is plenty for me. If you are fire I guess time isn't a problem but I didn't want my one time ling vacation spent on oneovercrowded trail. Something to think about.

Thanks! I don't know how seriously I would like to do the AT, I suspect that it was a pleasant thought that made me happy thinking about a while back. I think a shorter trip would be more my speed, but of course, who knows, maybe with experience I'll be interested in doing it.

You can do the AT without doing it all at once.  One of my mentors just finished section hiking it- 15 years after she started.

MgoSam

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #24 on: May 23, 2016, 02:45:37 PM »
Check out whiteblaze and backpackinglight. I bought all fancy gear but I've seen people with real cheapo kit all over. A lot of people manage on cheap gear. The key in my mind is keeping all gear excluding water and food pretty low. 8-15 lbs is a good goal.

I once dreamt of doing the AT, I took three months off work and did a road trip to the canadian rockies, northern bc, yukon and alaska. This let me hike in some fantastic areas and I realized 6-7 days at a time is plenty for me. If you are fire I guess time isn't a problem but I didn't want my one time ling vacation spent on oneovercrowded trail. Something to think about.

Thanks! I don't know how seriously I would like to do the AT, I suspect that it was a pleasant thought that made me happy thinking about a while back. I think a shorter trip would be more my speed, but of course, who knows, maybe with experience I'll be interested in doing it.

You can do the AT without doing it all at once.  One of my mentors just finished section hiking it- 15 years after she started.

Fair point.

MrsPete

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #25 on: May 23, 2016, 03:24:43 PM »
It actually looks kind of awesome, like living in the international space station or something. 
I also think it's awesome, but I say it looks like a hamster Habitrail. 

I'm 100% certain, of course, we'll keep camping in our ten-year old $30 eBay tent.

LadyMuMu

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #26 on: May 23, 2016, 03:40:21 PM »
A black tent doesn't seem very wise here in the south... ;)

Literally at the bottom of the main page, a link to this: https://www.podtents.com/isnt-a-black-tent-hotter-inside/?v=7516fd43adaa

That response is pure bunk. They claim that people who live in hot climates wear black clothing because it is cooler so their black tents don't absorb heat. As someone who grew up in a tropical climate--bull! We wear loose, light clothing--often light in color. Seriously, this statement alone makes me doubt all their other claims. It simply doesn't jive with the laws of physics. That, and their pod model design is just plain silly.

human

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #27 on: May 23, 2016, 05:58:51 PM »
Check out whiteblaze and backpackinglight. I bought all fancy gear but I've seen people with real cheapo kit all over. A lot of people manage on cheap gear. The key in my mind is keeping all gear excluding water and food pretty low. 8-15 lbs is a good goal.

I once dreamt of doing the AT, I took three months off work and did a road trip to the canadian rockies, northern bc, yukon and alaska. This let me hike in some fantastic areas and I realized 6-7 days at a time is plenty for me. If you are fire I guess time isn't a problem but I didn't want my one time ling vacation spent on oneovercrowded trail. Something to think about.

Thanks! I don't know how seriously I would like to do the AT, I suspect that it was a pleasant thought that made me happy thinking about a while back. I think a shorter trip would be more my speed, but of course, who knows, maybe with experience I'll be interested in doing it.

Shorter trips are a great way to get started. If you can, go on a shorter trip with people who are experienced and ask for help getting prepared. Chances are they will have gear you can borrow which will keep costs down (you can also rent from places like REI). There's a ton of backpacking gear out there, much of it is unnecessary and/or gimmicky. Experienced backpackers will help you learn exactly what you need, or don't need as it were.

My mantra when I take people just starting out: Feet, Fitness, Fuel. Feet - make sure your footwear fits correctly with whatever socks you're wearing, and shoes should be correctly broken in. Don't buy brand new hiking boots the week before going out - you're better off going with an existing pair of light hikers that are already broken in. Fitness - don't expect to do a 10 mile hike carrying a 30-40 lbs pack over steep terrain without being in reasonably good shape. Get out on practice hikes (with a loaded pack), get cardio on your bike, build leg strength. You'll enjoy it a lot more if you don't feel like you're going to die. The heavier the pack the better shape you need to be in, so keep it as light as possible. Fuel - Make sure you have the right amount and type of food for the trip. Take in small amounts of food and water frequently while hiking, which also gives you an opportunity to rest your feet and address any hot spots. You don't want to bonk or get dehydrated, which is just miserable. Of course there are a bunch of other necessities to consider such as shelter, where/how to get water, and such. But if you go with experienced people they will be able to take charge of these things if you can take care of yourself.

Maybe a bit preachy, but if you are carrying 40lbs and it's not to take weight off of your SO or something that's way too much. Alone for 8 days and nights 30-35 should be doable. Trail runners should be fine as long as you don't wear liners that let sand in.  Darn tough socks are the best ever!

MgoSam

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #28 on: May 23, 2016, 09:15:06 PM »
Check out whiteblaze and backpackinglight. I bought all fancy gear but I've seen people with real cheapo kit all over. A lot of people manage on cheap gear. The key in my mind is keeping all gear excluding water and food pretty low. 8-15 lbs is a good goal.

I once dreamt of doing the AT, I took three months off work and did a road trip to the canadian rockies, northern bc, yukon and alaska. This let me hike in some fantastic areas and I realized 6-7 days at a time is plenty for me. If you are fire I guess time isn't a problem but I didn't want my one time ling vacation spent on oneovercrowded trail. Something to think about.

Thanks! I don't know how seriously I would like to do the AT, I suspect that it was a pleasant thought that made me happy thinking about a while back. I think a shorter trip would be more my speed, but of course, who knows, maybe with experience I'll be interested in doing it.

Shorter trips are a great way to get started. If you can, go on a shorter trip with people who are experienced and ask for help getting prepared. Chances are they will have gear you can borrow which will keep costs down (you can also rent from places like REI). There's a ton of backpacking gear out there, much of it is unnecessary and/or gimmicky. Experienced backpackers will help you learn exactly what you need, or don't need as it were.

My mantra when I take people just starting out: Feet, Fitness, Fuel. Feet - make sure your footwear fits correctly with whatever socks you're wearing, and shoes should be correctly broken in. Don't buy brand new hiking boots the week before going out - you're better off going with an existing pair of light hikers that are already broken in. Fitness - don't expect to do a 10 mile hike carrying a 30-40 lbs pack over steep terrain without being in reasonably good shape. Get out on practice hikes (with a loaded pack), get cardio on your bike, build leg strength. You'll enjoy it a lot more if you don't feel like you're going to die. The heavier the pack the better shape you need to be in, so keep it as light as possible. Fuel - Make sure you have the right amount and type of food for the trip. Take in small amounts of food and water frequently while hiking, which also gives you an opportunity to rest your feet and address any hot spots. You don't want to bonk or get dehydrated, which is just miserable. Of course there are a bunch of other necessities to consider such as shelter, where/how to get water, and such. But if you go with experienced people they will be able to take charge of these things if you can take care of yourself.

Maybe a bit preachy, but if you are carrying 40lbs and it's not to take weight off of your SO or something that's way too much. Alone for 8 days and nights 30-35 should be doable. Trail runners should be fine as long as you don't wear liners that let sand in.  Darn tough socks are the best ever!

No, please continue, I'm loving the advice.

For boots, any suggestions? I bought a pair a few years ago but they aren't fitting properly, I didn't know what I was doing when I bought them.

Re: Fitness, I haven't gone on many hikes since last year, but I'm in fairly good physical shape. I've been doing at least 3 hours of kickboxing for the past 5 months (some weeks as much as 8 hours) and have restarting jogging as well, up to 1.5 miles straight (not a pressing concern, doing it to increase stamina for kickboxing).

I don't know too many people that enjoy backpacking, a few enjoy camping which I'm hoping to do with them, but I would really prefer to go a few days without having a permanent campsite. I've started looking at Meetup groups to see if there are any trips coming.

FINate

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #29 on: May 23, 2016, 11:44:43 PM »
Maybe a bit preachy, but if you are carrying 40lbs and it's not to take weight off of your SO or something that's way too much. Alone for 8 days and nights 30-35 should be doable. Trail runners should be fine as long as you don't wear liners that let sand in.  Darn tough socks are the best ever!

Agree that 30-35 should be fine in most cases. But there are some factors that might change this. I'm usually at elevation (8000-10000 ft) and some people get cold easily, so if it's early or late season an extra warm bag and extra layers adds up quickly. Same for if you're carrying a little extra weight like fishing gear - nothing like fresh trout cooked over a fire.

FINate

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #30 on: May 23, 2016, 11:57:59 PM »
For boots, any suggestions? I bought a pair a few years ago but they aren't fitting properly, I didn't know what I was doing when I bought them.

Re: Fitness, I haven't gone on many hikes since last year, but I'm in fairly good physical shape. I've been doing at least 3 hours of kickboxing for the past 5 months (some weeks as much as 8 hours) and have restarting jogging as well, up to 1.5 miles straight (not a pressing concern, doing it to increase stamina for kickboxing).

I don't know too many people that enjoy backpacking, a few enjoy camping which I'm hoping to do with them, but I would really prefer to go a few days without having a permanent campsite. I've started looking at Meetup groups to see if there are any trips coming.

Boots: The ones that fit your feet the best. Seriously, everyone's foot is different. My heel has a tendency to slip in many brands of boots, which caused terrible heel blisters. I had to try on a bunch to find ones that don't do this, and also had enough width in the toebox. So wear the socks that you're going to hike in, and bring along any orthotics you may use (I also have very high arches) and try on a bunch of different options. Don't be afraid to drop down to something less bulky that isn't strictly a backpacking boot - these should be fine for short trips.

GuitarStv

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #31 on: May 24, 2016, 08:32:19 AM »
I don't understand why they need to link together? Why hang out in a bunch of connected tents?
Why not hang out... outside?

What if it rains?!

Then you get wet.  And remember the difference between camping and sitting in your house.

MrMoogle

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #32 on: May 24, 2016, 08:51:24 AM »
A black tent doesn't seem very wise here in the south... ;)

Literally at the bottom of the main page, a link to this: https://www.podtents.com/isnt-a-black-tent-hotter-inside/?v=7516fd43adaa

That response is pure bunk. They claim that people who live in hot climates wear black clothing because it is cooler so their black tents don't absorb heat. As someone who grew up in a tropical climate--bull! We wear loose, light clothing--often light in color. Seriously, this statement alone makes me doubt all their other claims. It simply doesn't jive with the laws of physics. That, and their pod model design is just plain silly.
Yeah, it didn't make sense to me either, but I could be wrong.  I'm sure black would be hotter on the outside, but I guess it's possible it could be cooler on the inside?  I know clear would be bad, since it would let the light pass through, then prevent the heat from escaping.

nereo

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #33 on: May 24, 2016, 08:52:28 AM »
Holy Crap...
The maxi-pod weighs 24kg/53lbs (!)
It's $600-850 per tent (!)
Connecting two tent (which I guess is the whole point) will cost ~$2k (!)
Connecting two tents costs another $129 (!)
Most camp sites won't accommodate multiple tents this size linked together.
I don't buy their "why a black tent won't get hot" argument.

As others have mentioned Coleman makes large cheap tents for <$200. 
OR:  try this for half the price, half the weight, and a huge extra 'garage' (vestibule) for $73.

Also: the website needs to hire someone who can edit the text for proper English grammar.  It's really bad!

MicroRN

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #34 on: May 24, 2016, 09:11:44 AM »
And here I thought you were going to talk about glamping

I'm a red panda

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #35 on: May 24, 2016, 09:15:54 AM »
I've heard the argument for black being cooler than white in the heat many times before.  My personal experience is when it's 110 degrees and really humid, it's hot regardless of what color you are wearing; but -I- seem to be less likely to get a sunburn wearing black.

Beaker

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Re: McMansion tents
« Reply #36 on: May 24, 2016, 02:32:07 PM »
And to think that some of my camping friends look down on me for the ridiculous opulence of my two-person tent.

Of course, they use bivy sacks/shelters even for car camping. Bit far for me, though I do get jealous of the 10 second setup/teardown time and ability to chuck the whole thing in the car when you leave camp in the morning.