Author Topic: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)  (Read 30962 times)

gimp

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To park with driver's wheels to curb means the car is driven on the wrong side of the road before and after parking.

Sure, but who cares? You have to cross traffic to turn left or pull a u-turn, nothing wrong with crossing traffic (when safe) to park. IMO.

markbike528CBX

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #151 on: September 18, 2016, 06:57:43 PM »
....YUP.  I discovered this after I bought a house - a few months went by and I got a letter from the city complaining that a dead tree in my yard (50ft from the street) was a "blight" and I had to remove it within 10 days or pay a fine. ....

I had a tree that was encroaching on power lines.    The city(utility ) came and chopped the offending part off, leaving a tree that DW made me get trimmed to match and clear of the house.

No charge from the city, since it was their problem.

JLee

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To park with driver's wheels to curb means the car is driven on the wrong side of the road before and after parking.

Sure, but who cares? You have to cross traffic to turn left or pull a u-turn, nothing wrong with crossing traffic (when safe) to park. IMO.

Parallel parking on the wrong side of the road requires you to drive the wrong way, not just cross traffic.  In some areas u-turns are illegal too.

gimp

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #153 on: September 21, 2016, 01:36:21 PM »
We're probably imagining two different things. On a quiet residential street, it doesn't matter if you're on the wrong side of the road for a little while.

Chris22

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #154 on: September 21, 2016, 01:50:12 PM »
If you are parallel parked on the wrong side of the road you have to pull out into traffic with no ability to see the oncoming cars since you are on the far side of your car.

gimp

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #155 on: September 21, 2016, 01:53:45 PM »
If you turn left on a tightly packed street, you can't see shit either. And yet it's rarely an issue. Go slow, look through windshields, listen, poke your nose out so you're visible, and go when it seems clear.

BlueHouse

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #156 on: September 25, 2016, 06:36:12 AM »
We're probably imagining two different things. On a quiet residential street, it doesn't matter if you're on the wrong side of the road for a little while.
But the RULEZ! 
Must. Follow. Rulez.

Chris22

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #157 on: September 25, 2016, 07:12:37 AM »
If you turn left on a tightly packed street, you can't see shit either. And yet it's rarely an issue. Go slow, look through windshields, listen, poke your nose out so you're visible, and go when it seems clear.

Even on a tight street you have a side view mirror which you can use to see what's coming behind you and if it's clear you can pull out without someone hitting you head on. If you're on the wrong side of the road you'll be pulling out blind potentially into oncoming traffic.

risky4me

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #158 on: September 25, 2016, 03:38:53 PM »
Not quite same deal but....Many years ago I was in Bermuda and I understood that the gendarmes there could give you a ticket/fine for a visible rust spot or body damage- due to the fact that it is totally a tourist destination and they are very concerned about appearances(and it is beautiful there).

Primm

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #159 on: September 25, 2016, 06:40:08 PM »
If you turn left on a tightly packed street, you can't see shit either. And yet it's rarely an issue. Go slow, look through windshields, listen, poke your nose out so you're visible, and go when it seems clear.

Even on a tight street you have a side view mirror which you can use to see what's coming behind you and if it's clear you can pull out without someone hitting you head on. If you're on the wrong side of the road you'll be pulling out blind potentially into oncoming traffic.

Do you not have a side mirror on the passenger side of your car?

Chris22

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #160 on: September 25, 2016, 07:16:33 PM »
If you turn left on a tightly packed street, you can't see shit either. And yet it's rarely an issue. Go slow, look through windshields, listen, poke your nose out so you're visible, and go when it seems clear.

Even on a tight street you have a side view mirror which you can use to see what's coming behind you and if it's clear you can pull out without someone hitting you head on. If you're on the wrong side of the road you'll be pulling out blind potentially into oncoming traffic.

Do you not have a side mirror on the passenger side of your car?

I do. But it doesn't face forwards. You'd be pulling into ONCOMING traffic.

Primm

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #161 on: September 25, 2016, 08:17:13 PM »
Oh yeah, whoops! #spacialawarenessdeficit

I was thinking about parking on the wrong side of a one way street. Changes things up when the cars are coming from the opposite direction doesn't it?

dragoncar

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #162 on: September 26, 2016, 01:35:52 AM »
I like shared resources in an HOA, like a community swimming pool, club room, and maintained open spaces.  Not a fan of restrictions

But on the other hand I think people should be good neighbors.  That means maintaining your property.  Yes you have a right to keep a run down rv/boat/beater that never moves in your driveway but it's the real estate equivalent of going out in public after not showering for weeks.  Rude

Miss Piggy

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #163 on: September 26, 2016, 06:40:39 AM »
But on the other hand I think people should be good neighbors.  That means maintaining your property.  Yes you have a right to keep a run down rv/boat/beater that never moves in your driveway but it's the real estate equivalent of going out in public after not showering for weeks.  Rude

That seems like a good way to put it.

Kitsune

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #164 on: September 26, 2016, 06:49:44 AM »
But on the other hand I think people should be good neighbors.  That means maintaining your property.  Yes you have a right to keep a run down rv/boat/beater that never moves in your driveway but it's the real estate equivalent of going out in public after not showering for weeks.  Rude

That seems like a good way to put it.

I think that's a great way to put it. Or, in other words: not generally keeping your property in a presentable state is like going shopping in old sweatshirts and PJ pants and flip-flops. Not really the Socially Done Thing, and likely to get some side-eye. But on the other hand, sometimes Life Happens (and then the grass doesn't get mowed AND you find yourself at the grocery store in PJs because your family is sick, life happened, and there are Other Priorities(tm)). The advantage of having reasonable neighbors and no HOA is that if you're at the state where that's what's happening, you're more likely to get offers of shopping help, mowing help, and casserole dinners than a fine for an un-mowed lawn.

In other words, I love my neighbors and my community. ;)


BlueHouse

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #165 on: September 26, 2016, 11:08:41 AM »

But on the other hand I think people should be good neighbors.  That means maintaining your property.  Yes you have a right to keep a run down rv/boat/beater that never moves in your driveway but it's the real estate equivalent of going out in public after not showering for weeks.  Rude

That seems like a good way to put it.
. The advantage of having reasonable neighbors and no HOA is that if you're at the state where that's what's happening, you're more likely to get offers of shopping help, mowing help, and casserole dinners than a fine for an un-mowed lawn.

In other words, I love my neighbors and my community. ;)
These things are not mutually exclusive. I have wonderful neighbors and have had food, shopping, and shoveling done for me when I was injured. I also happen to live in an HOA community.  Soemtimes I think people believe that if you move into an HOA, you must become an asshole.

The key as you said, was to have reasonable neighbor's. Period.

NoVa

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #166 on: September 26, 2016, 11:20:37 AM »
I have been on both sides of the HOA/non-HOA situation.

I lived in Reston, VA., strict HOA. White basketball backboard over your garage door, attached to the house? Not acceptable, sent notice it must be painted the same dark brown as your house. Nothing done in a month, the HOA sent a handyman out to do it and billed the homeowner.

The other side of the coin (no HOA), up the street from a different house, we had someone we called Mr. Gravel. Extended family (maybe more than one family?), had 5-6 cars. One day a dump truck of bluestone gravel gets dumped on the front lawn and spread out, viola, instant parking for everyone.

jfolsen

BlueHouse

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #167 on: September 26, 2016, 02:18:28 PM »
I have been on both sides of the HOA/non-HOA situation.

I lived in Reston, VA., strict HOA. White basketball backboard over your garage door, attached to the house? Not acceptable, sent notice it must be painted the same dark brown as your house. Nothing done in a month, the HOA sent a handyman out to do it and billed the homeowner.

The other side of the coin (no HOA), up the street from a different house, we had someone we called Mr. Gravel. Extended family (maybe more than one family?), had 5-6 cars. One day a dump truck of bluestone gravel gets dumped on the front lawn and spread out, viola, instant parking for everyone.

jfolsen

I have a condo in Reston, but it's in the urban core, so not covered by the Reston Association.  But I am familiar with some of the RA CC&Rs.  Very restrictive, but for a town in Northern Virginia, it's a pretty crunchy place.  I think I would prefer a place that just does what it wants you to do and then bills you -- at least that way, there's no neighbor drama.  (well, I'm sure there is, but hopefully there is less).

For fun, I like to compare Reston with Sterling.  They are about 6 miles apart geographically, but worlds apart philosophically.    Those two areas are like night and day.  Sterling has the older homes, and a ton of new McMansions.  It's clearly built as a suburb for people commuting to DC or at least to Tysons.  Great big Costco, Lowe's, Home Depot, etc.  Reston has mostly older ('60s +) homes, and the dream of working, living, and playing in the same town.   Walk/Bike paths everywhere and those are the first things that get plowed!   I used to belong to both Freecycle groups and found that I could get anything I would ever want or need on the Sterling/Cascades Freecycle, but I couldn't get rid of anything.  I could get rid of anything on the Reston Freecycle, but the only thing you could GET were things like a 1/2 box of Kaashi or 3/4 bottle of Suave shampoo.   

MgoSam

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #168 on: September 26, 2016, 02:28:31 PM »

But on the other hand I think people should be good neighbors.  That means maintaining your property.  Yes you have a right to keep a run down rv/boat/beater that never moves in your driveway but it's the real estate equivalent of going out in public after not showering for weeks.  Rude

That seems like a good way to put it.
. The advantage of having reasonable neighbors and no HOA is that if you're at the state where that's what's happening, you're more likely to get offers of shopping help, mowing help, and casserole dinners than a fine for an un-mowed lawn.

In other words, I love my neighbors and my community. ;)
These things are not mutually exclusive. I have wonderful neighbors and have had food, shopping, and shoveling done for me when I was injured. I also happen to live in an HOA community.  Soemtimes I think people believe that if you move into an HOA, you must become an asshole.

The key as you said, was to have reasonable neighbor's. Period.

I live in a HOA and absolutely love my fellow members. Of course it helps that it's a tiny association (6 units) so this helps eliminate free-rider problems as all need to be involved and it's obvious when someone isn't doing their part. I'm inexperienced at handyman jobs, but I've been so lucky that one of the guys is very handy and patient, so he's saved my bacon numerous times in fixing up things around my house.

Last week I was running late for work and my garage wasn't closing properly. So I just locked my door and left and when I came back he had come by to take a look at it and told me how to fix it. I've never had such a courteous neighbor.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #169 on: September 26, 2016, 02:51:29 PM »
OT,  but my son is learning about the American Revolution now (grade 9).   Seeing it taught from a non-USA perspective is quite different than when my daughter studied it when we lived in California...
Minor quibble, but most historians refer to it as the American War for Independence. There really wasn't much revolutionary about it. If someone is referring to it as a revolution then most likely you getting either an intentionally or unintentionally biased viewpoint.

Goldielocks is in BC (i.e. Canada).  From our viewpoint it was the American Revolution.  A lot of Canadian settlement during and after the Revolution (i.e. fought by those not faithful to their oaths) was Loyalist (i.e. political refugees, faithful to their oath of allegiance).  It has always amazed me that the American Government of 1812 thought Canadians would like the idea of being annexed (ended up being part of the War of 1812-14) when the areas they invaded had been mostly settled by Loyalists. 

I got to watch the British 19th Light Dragoons and Glengarry Light Infantry Fencibles defeat the Americans this past Sunday.  (http://glengarrypioneermuseum.ca/home/events/1812-re-enactment/88-war-of-1812-re-enactment)

MgoSam

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #170 on: September 26, 2016, 03:34:51 PM »
It has always amazed me that the American Government of 1812 thought Canadians would like the idea of being annexed (ended up being part of the War of 1812-14) when the areas they invaded had been mostly settled by Loyalists. 


Well it was less than a decade before the US just declared that Central, South, and North America were US zones and that Europeans better just stay away. Oddly, it seems to have largely worked even though France, England, and Holland, and Spain were way more powerful than the Americans at the time.

RetiredAt63

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #171 on: September 26, 2016, 03:57:23 PM »
It has always amazed me that the American Government of 1812 thought Canadians would like the idea of being annexed (ended up being part of the War of 1812-14) when the areas they invaded had been mostly settled by Loyalists. 


Well it was less than a decade before the US just declared that Central, South, and North America were US zones and that Europeans better just stay away. Oddly, it seems to have largely worked even though France, England, and Holland, and Spain were way more powerful than the Americans at the time.
I vaguely remember Britain had a rough economy after the war, they had put so much effort into defeating Napoleon (which was why they were impressing American sailors in the first place, which helped start the War of 1812-14).  France the same from the other side. Holland as well, I would suppose.  But Spain and Portugal?  Maybe the Indies looked like a better return?

We've come a long way from shabby cars.  ;-)

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #172 on: September 26, 2016, 04:59:12 PM »
OT,  but my son is learning about the American Revolution now (grade 9).   Seeing it taught from a non-USA perspective is quite different than when my daughter studied it when we lived in California...
Minor quibble, but most historians refer to it as the American War for Independence. There really wasn't much revolutionary about it. If someone is referring to it as a revolution then most likely you getting either an intentionally or unintentionally biased viewpoint.

Both viewpoints are biased and it depends a lot on how the historian's group experienced the war. As a group they're not objective creatures although it's fun when they try to be.

People demanding and fighting for their independence generally view what they're doing as a "war for independence". If they win, that's what they get to call it, at least amongst themselves. The losing side (as in, people who are losing control over their colony) will be more likely to call it a "revolution". So will people who live nearby. In the 1776 incident, the people fighting for their independence were relatively successful at it.

Which side wins is also relevant.

LeRainDrop

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #173 on: September 26, 2016, 08:36:30 PM »
People demanding and fighting for their independence generally view what they're doing as a "war for independence". If they win, that's what they get to call it, at least amongst themselves. The losing side (as in, people who are losing control over their colony) will be more likely to call it a "revolution". So will people who live nearby. In the 1776 incident, the people fighting for their independence were relatively successful at it.

Which side wins is also relevant.

I could be wrong, but I think you have this backwards.  We in the US call it the "American Revolution," while it is the British who more commonly call it the "American War for Independence."  See here at footnote 21.  I think we all agree that the US won that war, right?

TheGrimSqueaker

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #174 on: September 26, 2016, 09:06:54 PM »
People demanding and fighting for their independence generally view what they're doing as a "war for independence". If they win, that's what they get to call it, at least amongst themselves. The losing side (as in, people who are losing control over their colony) will be more likely to call it a "revolution". So will people who live nearby. In the 1776 incident, the people fighting for their independence were relatively successful at it.

Which side wins is also relevant.

I could be wrong, but I think you have this backwards.  We in the US call it the "American Revolution," while it is the British who more commonly call it the "American War for Independence."  See here at footnote 21.  I think we all agree that the US won that war, right?

Some of it. They got a fair bit of the territory they wanted, but nowhere near all they were going for.

Growing up in Alberta, I remember reading about the "American Revolutionary War".

LeRainDrop

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #175 on: September 26, 2016, 09:17:44 PM »
People demanding and fighting for their independence generally view what they're doing as a "war for independence". If they win, that's what they get to call it, at least amongst themselves. The losing side (as in, people who are losing control over their colony) will be more likely to call it a "revolution". So will people who live nearby. In the 1776 incident, the people fighting for their independence were relatively successful at it.

Which side wins is also relevant.

I could be wrong, but I think you have this backwards.  We in the US call it the "American Revolution," while it is the British who more commonly call it the "American War for Independence."  See here at footnote 21.  I think we all agree that the US won that war, right?

Some of it. They got a fair bit of the territory they wanted, but nowhere near all they were going for.

Growing up in Alberta, I remember reading about the "American Revolutionary War".

Interesting.  I grew up in Massachusetts, close to Boston, so I went to many Revolution-related historical sites on school field trips and with my family.  All the talk was of the "American Revolution" and the "Revolutionary War."  Yes, we "declared independence" from Great Britain on July 4, 1776, and the end result of the war was that we "won our independence,"  but the war was the "Revolution."

Goldielocks

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Re: Letter drop asking residents to devise a plan to replace "shabby" cars :)
« Reply #176 on: September 26, 2016, 11:24:15 PM »
OT,  but my son is learning about the American Revolution now (grade 9).   Seeing it taught from a non-USA perspective is quite different than when my daughter studied it when we lived in California...
Minor quibble, but most historians refer to it as the American War for Independence. There really wasn't much revolutionary about it. If someone is referring to it as a revolution then most likely you getting either an intentionally or unintentionally biased viewpoint.

Nothing so sinister.   His second chapter was the "French revolution", so I think that the text author and perhaps teacher just liked the word pattern consistency of it..   
:-)