Author Topic: Friend posted about MMM on Facebook...then his GF convinced him it was foolish  (Read 21704 times)

MissStache

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ARGH!

I have two "friends" on Facebook.  I would call them acquaintances at best, but I do know them both personally.  One for many years.  Guy friend posted a link to an MMM podcast with the comment "I think I need to start looking at my finances differently."  I immediately comment that I'm a secret mustachian and that it has been the path to prosperity and happiness for me!  Do it, so wonderful!

GF chimes in with how it is "impossible" because they (she) have "crushing" student loans (legit...but that's what you get when to go to get your Master's Degree at GWU in...get this...folklore) and they already cut back so much by almost "never" going out to eat and not buying new clothes "very much."  Naturally they are always posting about dinners out and she is big into retail therapy.   Oh, and of course they live in this awful, expensive city and no one can save here!  And of course MMM was just lucky and no regular person could do this and it was unfair and judge-y of him to say otherwise.

I tried to CALMLY comment that I also live in this expensive city and that I mostly did it living alone on one income when I was in the "crush your debts" part of my journey, and I'm most certainly a regular person.  I said it was hard at first but easy once you got the hang of it and that it has brought me more stability and hope and happiness that I thought was possible.  She shot back that "they don't deserve to live like paupers and they have worked hard for what they have!" and my old favorite that they "deserve" to treat themselves occasionally.

He was so getting on board and she just totally derailed it and he basically said "Well yeah, I guess you're right.  Oh well."  So frustrating...so sad.  Wish people could just open their mind for a moment and realize that they are in charge of where their money goes and how they use it. 


EricP

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Is this person actually a friend or just a facebook friend?

Because in my opinion once a person has discovered a little bit of MMM for themselves, it's a whole lot easier to convince them that not having to work is awesome, then the complainypants on the other side convincing them that consumption is awesome.

forummm

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Translation of GF: "But we really should keep spending all that money on me"

ash7962

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Maybe the guy just said that to avoid a fight with his GF, but will still check out mustachianism!  Might be wishful thinking, but I hope so for his sake.

KittyCat

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That's quite unfortunate; well, his interest was piqued once, maybe not all hope is lost.

La Bibliotecaria Feroz

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I dunno about other people, but my first reaction was, "Well, that's fine for HIM, but it would never work for ME." Maybe the seed planted will grow into something, especially since you outed yourself.

Argyle

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Folklore is actually a field with a lot of jobs relative to graduates.  I teach in a Folklore program and the number of our MAs who get jobs in the field is huge basically all of them who want one.  If she's not earning money from Folklore, something else is going on.

okits

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Is this person actually a friend or just a facebook friend?

Because in my opinion once a person has discovered a little bit of MMM for themselves, it's a whole lot easier to convince them that not having to work is awesome, then the complainypants on the other side convincing them that consumption is awesome.

Yeah, since you outed yourself hopefully he can view you as a relatable example of freedom > consumption.  The Internet has led him right to the edge of the water...  It's up to him to drink (or not.)

Squirrel away

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It's amazing how defensive and negative people can be to new ideas that challenge their beliefs about life.:P

I saw this reaction on a British forum recently, people who were planning to retire early were told that they were lucky that they could do it because most people can't afford to, lol. Luck really has nothing to do with it.

tj

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It's amazing how defensive and negative people can be to new ideas that challenge their beliefs about life.:P

I saw this reaction on a British forum recently, people who were planning to retire early were told that they were lucky that they could do it because most people can't afford to, lol. Luck really has nothing to do with it.

I'd say luck has a lot to do with it. Lucky that we didn't marry the wrong person, that our parents didn't open a bunch of credit cards in our names and run up the debt. There is a lot of luck in how we get to where we are and to discount that I think is foolish.

fb132

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It's amazing how defensive and negative people can be to new ideas that challenge their beliefs about life.:P

I saw this reaction on a British forum recently, people who were planning to retire early were told that they were lucky that they could do it because most people can't afford to, lol. Luck really has nothing to do with it.

I'd say luck has a lot to do with it. Lucky that we didn't marry the wrong person, that our parents didn't open a bunch of credit cards in our names and run up the debt. There is a lot of luck in how we get to where we are and to discount that I think is foolish.
You are right about the parents part, but usually you have a clue if your SO is a reckless spender, there are usually lots of signs of that even before marriage unless she is one big fat liar and con artist.

tj

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It's amazing how defensive and negative people can be to new ideas that challenge their beliefs about life.:P

I saw this reaction on a British forum recently, people who were planning to retire early were told that they were lucky that they could do it because most people can't afford to, lol. Luck really has nothing to do with it.

I'd say luck has a lot to do with it. Lucky that we didn't marry the wrong person, that our parents didn't open a bunch of credit cards in our names and run up the debt. There is a lot of luck in how we get to where we are and to discount that I think is foolish.
You are right about the parents part, but usually you have a clue if your SO is a reckless spender, there are usually lots of signs of that even before marriage unless she is one big fat liar and con artist.

There seems to be a lot of people who get taken to the cleaners by their ex spouse that never expected it. I consider myself very fortunate to have not married young and divorced young.

Cpa Cat

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Well, keep an eye out. If/When they break up, you can send him a message saying "Sorry to hear about your breakup. I found you a new girlfriend, and then send him a photo of MMM."

Too creepy?

Tigerpine

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Translation of GF: "But we really should keep spending all that money on me"
Sounds like my last girlfriend.

Based on my recent experience, I would tell the guy to loose his girlfriend and start down the path to FI.  The numerous women on this forum is proof enough to me that eventually you can find someone of like mind.

The Guru

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MissStache,

If they are just casual acquaintances, where's the harm in taking another shot at pointing out the pitfalls of their consumerist hamster wheel and ask if they want to "[work] hard for what they have" for the rest of their lives.
. She might be beyond hope; might save him, though.

Squirrel away

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It's amazing how defensive and negative people can be to new ideas that challenge their beliefs about life.:P

I saw this reaction on a British forum recently, people who were planning to retire early were told that they were lucky that they could do it because most people can't afford to, lol. Luck really has nothing to do with it.

I'd say luck has a lot to do with it. Lucky that we didn't marry the wrong person, that our parents didn't open a bunch of credit cards in our names and run up the debt. There is a lot of luck in how we get to where we are and to discount that I think is foolish.

I grew up in a single parent household and so did my husband, there is no luck involved in us buying a small house, saving our money, starting a pension and deciding not to have a car or children or holidays, they were deliberate choices.

We live in London ffs (which I think is now the third most expensive city in the world) and we manage to live frugally.:)

I know there is luck involved in being born in a rich country but I assume the couple in question are from the US so they had the same advantage.

The person we are discussing isn't even married anyway, as it says the woman is his girlfriend.

If people want to say they can't save or live differently they can but I find it hard to believe it in a lot of cases.

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I dunno about other people, but my first reaction was, "Well, that's fine for HIM, but it would never work for ME." Maybe the seed planted will grow into something, especially since you outed yourself.

Same here.  It was a year after I first read the blog that I actually got on board. 

OP: No need to badger him - just live the example.  :)

zephyr911

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I tried to CALMLY comment that I also live in this expensive city and that I mostly did it living alone on one income when I was in the "crush your debts" part of my journey, and I'm most certainly a regular person.  I said it was hard at first but easy once you got the hang of it and that it has brought me more stability and hope and happiness that I thought was possible.  She shot back that "they don't deserve to live like paupers and they have worked hard for what they have!" and my old favorite that they "deserve" to treat themselves occasionally.
See, right there, she contradicted herself by changing her argument from "it can't be done" to "I don't want to do it".

In situations like that, all you have to do is stop there and insist they pick one. It can't be both.

MissStache

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I thought about this all weekend!  It surprised me because I'm pretty much a live and let live kind of person and these people really have no impact on my everyday life, other than that we share some mutual friends and I run into them occasionally due to a mutual hobby.  Frankly I shouldn't care about their lives all that much.  But MAN!  It is really getting to me.

Is it totally out of line to send him a private message and encourage him to look harder at this lifestyle?  I feel like with a little support he could at least start, and honestly I think he could get her to come around.  But I don't like to meddle...so torn. 

FatCat

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It's amazing how defensive and negative people can be to new ideas that challenge their beliefs about life.:P

I saw this reaction on a British forum recently, people who were planning to retire early were told that they were lucky that they could do it because most people can't afford to, lol. Luck really has nothing to do with it.

I'd say luck has a lot to do with it. Lucky that we didn't marry the wrong person, that our parents didn't open a bunch of credit cards in our names and run up the debt. There is a lot of luck in how we get to where we are and to discount that I think is foolish.

I know a few guys who have the same exact name as their dad and that somehow ruined their credit or got them in legal trouble for something the father did. The best thing you can do for your children if you're a deadbeat or get arrested often is not name your kids after you. One person I know is having trouble now because his record is showing that he owes his own mom child support. He's just starting his adult life, and his credit is already trashed by same-name deadbeat dad. I'm not sure if dad is using the kid's social security number to do this or what.

When I first learned my credit score it was in high 700s because my mom added me to her account when I was a kid just so I would start my adult life with a good credit history. Her credit score is in the 800s so this worked out fine. If she had bad credit she could have taken me down with her before I was even old enough to understand what a credit score was. So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

MissStache

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So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

My college roommate found out a few years after she graduated that her mother had taken out a bunch of Student Loans in her name to pay for her out-of-state college.  Friend was FURIOUS because she had no idea, and her mom kept telling her that there was plenty of money and not to worry about getting a job to help pay the bills, gave her a generous living allowance, etc.  If she had any idea that this was the way her mom was paying for it she would have done things so differently.  Instead she's saddled with loads of Student Loan debt that she wasn't even aware she had and had to start paying when her mom lost her job.  So awful. 

zephyr911

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So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

My college roommate found out a few years after she graduated that her mother had taken out a bunch of Student Loans in her name to pay for her out-of-state college.  Friend was FURIOUS because she had no idea, and her mom kept telling her that there was plenty of money and not to worry about getting a job to help pay the bills, gave her a generous living allowance, etc.  If she had any idea that this was the way her mom was paying for it she would have done things so differently.  Instead she's saddled with loads of Student Loan debt that she wasn't even aware she had and had to start paying when her mom lost her job.  So awful.
Isn't there any way she can try to prove she didn't consent to that debt? That's crazy...

Squirrel away

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Parents taking out debt in the child's name must be fairly rare though surely, I've never heard of that happening to anyone I know. Maybe it's different in the UK.

I'm talking about normal people on forums and in real life in similar (or more affluent) financial situations than mine saying that they "can't" retire early because for various reasons they can't budget and save the way we do. It's really their life and if they want to spend every they have on here and now good for them but I resent being told we are the lucky ones because we are frugal. There are lots of people on MMM doing the same as us and it can't be down to luck in most of the cases.

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I thought about this all weekend!  It surprised me because I'm pretty much a live and let live kind of person and these people really have no impact on my everyday life, other than that we share some mutual friends and I run into them occasionally due to a mutual hobby.  Frankly I shouldn't care about their lives all that much.  But MAN!  It is really getting to me.

Is it totally out of line to send him a private message and encourage him to look harder at this lifestyle?  I feel like with a little support he could at least start, and honestly I think he could get her to come around.  But I don't like to meddle...so torn.
Could you send him a message and say something like: sorry, didn't mean to start an argument between you and girlfriend - anyway, let me know if you want to find out anything more about mustachianism.  Or perhaps just bring it up the next time you do see him in person?

Or you could, you know, just send him a link to this thread. :) 

FatCat

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So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

My college roommate found out a few years after she graduated that her mother had taken out a bunch of Student Loans in her name to pay for her out-of-state college.  Friend was FURIOUS because she had no idea, and her mom kept telling her that there was plenty of money and not to worry about getting a job to help pay the bills, gave her a generous living allowance, etc.  If she had any idea that this was the way her mom was paying for it she would have done things so differently.  Instead she's saddled with loads of Student Loan debt that she wasn't even aware she had and had to start paying when her mom lost her job.  So awful.

I don't see why some parents feel like they're entitled to do this sort of thing. My guess is the mom thought she was helping by relieving the burden of financial worry so the daughter could focus on schoolwork. I think the only way she could get out of this debt would cause the mother to be in legal trouble for identity theft. If she doesn't want to get her mother in trouble she's stuck with it.

MrMoneyMaxwell

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

Gin1984

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Parents taking out debt in the child's name must be fairly rare though surely, I've never heard of that happening to anyone I know. Maybe it's different in the UK.

I'm talking about normal people on forums and in real life in similar (or more affluent) financial situations than mine saying that they "can't" retire early because for various reasons they can't budget and save the way we do. It's really their life and if they want to spend every they have on here and now good for them but I resent being told we are the lucky ones because we are frugal. There are lots of people on MMM doing the same as us and it can't be down to luck in most of the cases.
I know quite a few, it seemed a popular plan in the "upper middle class" when I was in high school.  Then the recession happened, parents lost jobs, told their kids what they did and then poof.  Adult kids are screwed and still can't find a decent job plus they have all these loans.

MgoSam

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I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

Yup, that's how my sister views me and my plans for retiring before I'm 37. She fails to realize that I plan to keep myself active, and instead referring to not needing to do things for money (I make a good living, but it is a lot of stress...I find myself waking up in the middle of the night thinking of things to do at the office).

fb132

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".
What is ironic is people call you lazy, but they usually complain how they hate their jobs and have little time for their kids/family...by going FIRE, they will be able to tell their boss to shove it and spend more time with the kids/family.

Forcus

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Folklore is actually a field with a lot of jobs relative to graduates.  I teach in a Folklore program and the number of our MAs who get jobs in the field is huge basically all of them who want one.  If she's not earning money from Folklore, something else is going on.
I was about the make complete fun of the folklore degree but just curious what kind of jobs there would be in this field??

FatCat

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

I don't see how wanting to do other things than going to the same job every day of your life is considered lazy, or why being "lazy" is necessarily a bad thing. It is precisely the fact that I want to do multiple things in my day that I want to quit my job that is taking up most of the hours of my day. Wanting more variety in life is "lazy" because we all need to work full time until we're too old to work anymore to be good citizens, don't you know. I'm surprised you didn't get comments about how boring early retirement would be. Without someone else dictating what tasks you are to do all day, there is no possible way you will be able to stay retired long before you become bored with deciding your own daily schedule and miss the comfort and security of someone else deciding it for you.

Khaetra

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

I've heard that line myself, plus since I am divorced I also get the wonderful "Must be nice to lounge around on the Ex's money".  People find it hard to believe that I earned my own money to be able to retire at 40 and since we didn't share any assets and kept everything separate there was no alimony.  I just chalk it up to them being jealous spendypants.  Since being retired I am far from 'lazy', as I have plenty of time to do the things I want to do and sometimes I find myself being busier than I was when I worked!

Cookie78

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

I've heard that line myself, plus since I am divorced I also get the wonderful "Must be nice to lounge around on the Ex's money".  People find it hard to believe that I earned my own money to be able to retire at 40 and since we didn't share any assets and kept everything separate there was no alimony.  I just chalk it up to them being jealous spendypants.  Since being retired I am far from 'lazy', as I have plenty of time to do the things I want to do and sometimes I find myself being busier than I was when I worked!

Those are really disheartening responses. I wouldn't even know how to respond.

AlanStache

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Parents taking out debt in the child's name must be fairly rare though surely, I've never heard of that happening to anyone I know. Maybe it's different in the UK.

During collage my parent with drew a significant amount of cash from my bank account, I think it was accidental but still very shocking (linked accounts and a fat finger?-dont recall the details) and a PIA for the week it took to get it back.  Then in HS for a short time parent had a CC in my name. CC was paid off and caused no real problems for me but still.  American youth are perhaps more vulnerable financially to there parents than in the UK even after they turn 18, or is a difference in culture - I dont know. 

sorry for taking it back OT.

EricP

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So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

My college roommate found out a few years after she graduated that her mother had taken out a bunch of Student Loans in her name to pay for her out-of-state college.  Friend was FURIOUS because she had no idea, and her mom kept telling her that there was plenty of money and not to worry about getting a job to help pay the bills, gave her a generous living allowance, etc.  If she had any idea that this was the way her mom was paying for it she would have done things so differently.  Instead she's saddled with loads of Student Loan debt that she wasn't even aware she had and had to start paying when her mom lost her job.  So awful.
Isn't there any way she can try to prove she didn't consent to that debt? That's crazy...

She definitely could, but it would probably require sending her mom to jail.  An outcome which most would not be willing to do.

AlanStache

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So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

My college roommate found out a few years after she graduated that her mother had taken out a bunch of Student Loans in her name to pay for her out-of-state college.  Friend was FURIOUS because she had no idea, and her mom kept telling her that there was plenty of money and not to worry about getting a job to help pay the bills, gave her a generous living allowance, etc.  If she had any idea that this was the way her mom was paying for it she would have done things so differently.  Instead she's saddled with loads of Student Loan debt that she wasn't even aware she had and had to start paying when her mom lost her job.  So awful.
Isn't there any way she can try to prove she didn't consent to that debt? That's crazy...

She definitely could, but it would probably require sending her mom to jail.  An outcome which most would not be willing to do.

Jail = two birds, one stone.  Remove the debt and the moms living expenses!  JOKING!! This would be well beyond something I would consider.

K-ice

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So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

My college roommate found out a few years after she graduated that her mother had taken out a bunch of Student Loans in her name to pay for her out-of-state college.  Friend was FURIOUS because she had no idea, and her mom kept telling her that there was plenty of money and not to worry about getting a job to help pay the bills, gave her a generous living allowance, etc.  If she had any idea that this was the way her mom was paying for it she would have done things so differently.  Instead she's saddled with loads of Student Loan debt that she wasn't even aware she had and had to start paying when her mom lost her job.  So awful.

I told my SO about this and the first reaction was zero sympathy.  "So she wasn't respecting & was over spending her mom's money. That's the problem with many politicians and anyone who has a spending account. "

Ok fair argument. People need to respect and wisely spend all money.

But we both agreed the secret loans were bad and the mom should have been transparent with her adult daughter.

stlbrah

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Sounds like its time for a new gf lol.

MrMoneyMaxwell

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

I've heard that line myself, plus since I am divorced I also get the wonderful "Must be nice to lounge around on the Ex's money".  People find it hard to believe that I earned my own money to be able to retire at 40 and since we didn't share any assets and kept everything separate there was no alimony.  I just chalk it up to them being jealous spendypants.  Since being retired I am far from 'lazy', as I have plenty of time to do the things I want to do and sometimes I find myself being busier than I was when I worked!

Those are really disheartening responses. I wouldn't even know how to respond.

Yeah. Pretty disheartening. But I put a caveat on my FB post by saying it would only make sense to a few and probably be met with criticism by others. I wasn't really shocked at the people that sent the messages.

Cookie78

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

I've heard that line myself, plus since I am divorced I also get the wonderful "Must be nice to lounge around on the Ex's money".  People find it hard to believe that I earned my own money to be able to retire at 40 and since we didn't share any assets and kept everything separate there was no alimony.  I just chalk it up to them being jealous spendypants.  Since being retired I am far from 'lazy', as I have plenty of time to do the things I want to do and sometimes I find myself being busier than I was when I worked!

Those are really disheartening responses. I wouldn't even know how to respond.

Yeah. Pretty disheartening. But I put a caveat on my FB post by saying it would only make sense to a few and probably be met with criticism by others. I wasn't really shocked at the people that sent the messages.

Are these reactions from people you are close to? Or Facebook acquaintances?

I haven't really shared many MMM type things on my Facebook, and beyond immediate family, boyfriend, and as of tonight my realtor (who is also a friend) I haven't told anyone of my plans. I'm curious if I'd get negative responses like that if I start sharing on Facebook, but I don't think I'll bother until after I'm FIREd.

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Send the private message. No point arguing in public.

MissStache

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So yeah, there is some luck as in who your parents are and what decisions they make for you...

My college roommate found out a few years after she graduated that her mother had taken out a bunch of Student Loans in her name to pay for her out-of-state college.  Friend was FURIOUS because she had no idea, and her mom kept telling her that there was plenty of money and not to worry about getting a job to help pay the bills, gave her a generous living allowance, etc.  If she had any idea that this was the way her mom was paying for it she would have done things so differently.  Instead she's saddled with loads of Student Loan debt that she wasn't even aware she had and had to start paying when her mom lost her job.  So awful.

I told my SO about this and the first reaction was zero sympathy.  "So she wasn't respecting & was over spending her mom's money. That's the problem with many politicians and anyone who has a spending account. "

Ok fair argument. People need to respect and wisely spend all money.

But we both agreed the secret loans were bad and the mom should have been transparent with her adult daughter.

I do kind of agree with that, but her mom really crippled her about money.  She had no concept of what anything cost, or how much money her mom made, or what they could afford or couldn't.  She was just totally in the dark about what was reasonable and what wasn't.  To roommate's credit, her mom served as a terrible example and made her pretty disciplined with her finances.  She surely got a crash course in why credit was bad, but it a terrible cost.  It did a lot of harm to her finances and her relationship with her mother.  If her mom had just said, "honey, we can't afford for you to go to school out-of-state, so if you want to do it here are the steps we need to take..." then she would have been able to make an informed decision. 

MrMoneyMaxwell

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I posted the MMM interview he did with Art of Manliness and said something along the lines that "It's a good way to look at your finances, and you don't need to work until you're 60".

I received numerous messages about how I'm "lazy".

A mixture of both. The people that "got it" sent private messages or texted me. The people that "didn't get it" posted a message to my FB page.
I've heard that line myself, plus since I am divorced I also get the wonderful "Must be nice to lounge around on the Ex's money".  People find it hard to believe that I earned my own money to be able to retire at 40 and since we didn't share any assets and kept everything separate there was no alimony.  I just chalk it up to them being jealous spendypants.  Since being retired I am far from 'lazy', as I have plenty of time to do the things I want to do and sometimes I find myself being busier than I was when I worked!

Those are really disheartening responses. I wouldn't even know how to respond.

Yeah. Pretty disheartening. But I put a caveat on my FB post by saying it would only make sense to a few and probably be met with criticism by others. I wasn't really shocked at the people that sent the messages.

Are these reactions from people you are close to? Or Facebook acquaintances?

I haven't really shared many MMM type things on my Facebook, and beyond immediate family, boyfriend, and as of tonight my realtor (who is also a friend) I haven't told anyone of my plans. I'm curious if I'd get negative responses like that if I start sharing on Facebook, but I don't think I'll bother until after I'm FIREd.

davisgang90

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I LOL'd at a Masters from GWU in folklore.

Kaspian

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How long have you been doing Mustachianism, MissStache?  I've learned to keep my mouth shut.  Some of my closest friends know I'm doing it (indeed, one of them has begun to emulate the minimalist lifestyle), but otherwise the word is mum.  I've found the levels of anger,  innumeracy, and negativity people can lash is out of proportion with what MMM proposes.  I'd like to help my friends, but I'm afraid most will find out when my Facebook status reads something like, "Done working for life!  Retired.  Hope you're enjoying your quartz countertops and SUVs. So long, suckas!!"

EricP

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How long have you been doing Mustachianism, MissStache?  I've learned to keep my mouth shut.  Some of my closest friends know I'm doing it (indeed, one of them has begun to emulate the minimalist lifestyle), but otherwise the word is mum.  I've found the levels of anger,  innumeracy, and negativity people can lash is out of proportion with what MMM proposes.  I'd like to help my friends, but I'm afraid most will find out when my Facebook status reads something like, "Done working for life!  Retired.  Hope you're enjoying your quartz countertops and SUVs. So long, suckas!!"

I've never experienced this type of reaction.  The only thing people ever take issue with is that MMM is a big bike advocate and most people think that just isn't feasible.  Sure, I could buy a house close to work, but as soon as I get a different job across town I'm not going to uproot my family and move them, especially when my wife would then have to drive twice as far to work.  And I think this is a legit argument.

There are some people who don't understand the power of the stock market and think that it would require way too much money to retire without fixed pensions and such, but that's not really MMM criticism, that's just being dumb.

MgoSam

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Seriously, months like August are enough to convince me that I can't wait to retire and retire early. Most days have felt like pulling nails.

Khaetra

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I posted this http://www.omaha.com/money/why-save-the-best-for-last-steps-to-making-mini/article_b0630e18-1fea-5c0a-bfbe-1fa537f11023.html article on facebook a while back and got a hugely long comment from one friend about how it's not possible for normal people and he actually seemed indignant that someone would even suggest it. He deleted it pretty quickly (but not fast enough since I saw it) so I can't post it here

This is from the same guy who could not hang out with us one week because he spent so much money backing kickstarters he couldn't afford the gas to drive maybe 50 miles round trip.

Even if we succeed in retiring in 5 years (younger than he currently is) he'll still insist it's impossible and that we just can't understand because we don't have kids/don't have a spendy spouse/I'm a goddamn unicorn apparently and no other woman is like me (though as often as my male friends say that maybe it's true...)

It's hard to "just be a good example" because you can't say things like "I just set all my retirement accounts to max out so I can retire younger" it just comes across wrong in all ways to people who don't get it

I bolded the part that rings just so true.  I gave up trying to explain how it is that I could afford to retire and just live the life I had envisioned. 

Eric

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How long have you been doing Mustachianism, MissStache?  I've learned to keep my mouth shut.  Some of my closest friends know I'm doing it (indeed, one of them has begun to emulate the minimalist lifestyle), but otherwise the word is mum.  I've found the levels of anger,  innumeracy, and negativity people can lash is out of proportion with what MMM proposes.  I'd like to help my friends, but I'm afraid most will find out when my Facebook status reads something like, "Done working for life!  Retired.  Hope you're enjoying your quartz countertops and SUVs. So long, suckas!!"

It's not like this was an unsolicited "conversion" attempt.  The guy posted about MMM first!  It seems perfectly reasonable to chime in and say that MMM has helped you.

Kaspian

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How long have you been doing Mustachianism, MissStache?  I've learned to keep my mouth shut.  Some of my closest friends know I'm doing it (indeed, one of them has begun to emulate the minimalist lifestyle), but otherwise the word is mum.  I've found the levels of anger,  innumeracy, and negativity people can lash is out of proportion with what MMM proposes.  I'd like to help my friends, but I'm afraid most will find out when my Facebook status reads something like, "Done working for life!  Retired.  Hope you're enjoying your quartz countertops and SUVs. So long, suckas!!"

It's not like this was an unsolicited "conversion" attempt.  The guy posted about MMM first!  It seems perfectly reasonable to chime in and say that MMM has helped you.

I know.  Anyone ever asks me about it, I'd be full on supportive and helpful.  Significant other shows up with rage, I'd step slowly back from the bomb.  Not sticking my neck between a couple, fuck that.  Learned my lesson way too many times when one person asked for "advice" on the other.