Author Topic: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .  (Read 30223 times)

KodeBlue

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 213
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #50 on: December 19, 2014, 06:37:24 AM »
   

As the conversations went back down to smaller groups, the chatty guy next to me said his family is "dirt poor" and that he has no clue about money management, so "what should he do?" he asked. 

Maybe read some books about personal finance?
My family was "dirt poor" also so that made me determined to be smarter about my own money management.

aschmidt2930

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 273
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #51 on: December 19, 2014, 09:15:44 AM »
There's an easy solution to that, he should just go with the $25/mo Republic Wireless unlimited plan.  It's more than the plan you're advocating, but still far less than $130/mo and he can still snap and text from anywhere. 

Shade00

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 146
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #52 on: December 19, 2014, 10:16:32 AM »
I'm 26, and the cell phone thing is definitely true, although I don't think it's limited to just my generation.  There are lots of older folks who also overpay for postpaid smartphone accounts.  However, I do know many peers who basically feel that a $100/month bill is completely normal and don't take the time to understand prepaid even if I try to explain it to them.  I'm on a Verizon prepaid plan which is comparatively luxurious compared to many MMM forum members.  I'm in NH and GSM service is atrocious, so my only choice is Verizon $45/month prepaid.

Page plus is 30 a month. It's verizon (CDMA/LTE with flashing).

LTE is available without flashing on Page Plus, and flashing will no longer be allowed for any devices after January 15. Still, you can get the $29.95 plan for ~$26.xx from many online resellers, which is a heck of a deal for Verizon LTE coverage.

Zamboni

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2702
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #53 on: December 20, 2014, 03:35:03 PM »
Maybe read some books about personal finance?
My family was "dirt poor" also so that made me determined to be smarter about my own money management.

Suggesting a book is a good idea.  I'm pretty sure that he would have trouble digesting Dave Ramsey's religion references, although I know it works for some people.  If it comes up again, maybe I'll recommend the Millionaire Next Door and/or Millionaire Teacher; the latter has a good section the huge difference that investing early makes, and it also has a pretty good section on cars.

I think there were only two people at that table who might even be ready to receive this information:  the other older guy, who is from another culture and says nearly nothing but I bet has it all figured out already, and the young guy with two new car payments who asked. 

MrsPete

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 3514
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #54 on: December 20, 2014, 03:37:29 PM »
Yay, another pile-on millennials post!

It's a combination of lifestyle expectations and advertising. Parents using TV as a babysitter, subjecting their kids to massive amounts of advertising before the veracity of said advertisements can be understood; listening to my nephews quote commercials and sing the jingles is cringe-worthy. I know my first few smart phones and plans were paid for by my parents, so once I had the job it was easy to slide into a similar plan with new phones every 2 years. Nobody advertises reliable used cars, but there are tons of advertisements for new cars, advertisements which tease a low monthly rate, not a low sticker price. Buying new cars every few years is likely something they learned from their parents and television. Drinking at the bar/pub with friends is celebrated on nearly every sitcom out there. Going from being a poor college student to being flush with cash at your new job is something very few people are equipped to handle, since most people don't have a required personal finance class where they learn about money management, debt, investing, etc.
Vampires have been a hot thing on TV and in books for the last decade -- half of a twenty-something's life -- yet none of you are stupid enough to think you'll ever actually meet a bloodsucker.  If you can differentiate that from real life, why can't you differentiate other not-realistic things that're promoted? 

Philociraptor

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1003
  • Age: 31
  • Location: DFW, TX
  • Eat. Sleep. Lift. Repeat.
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #55 on: December 20, 2014, 04:40:40 PM »
Vampires have been a hot thing on TV and in books for the last decade -- half of a twenty-something's life -- yet none of you are stupid enough to think you'll ever actually meet a bloodsucker.  If you can differentiate that from real life, why can't you differentiate other not-realistic things that're promoted?

Not even close, good try though. Read up on how children interpret advertising on TV. "Last decade" would be teenage years, far from early childhood.

arebelspy

  • Administrator
  • Senior Mustachian
  • *****
  • Posts: 28259
  • Age: -999
  • Location: Seattle, WA
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #56 on: December 20, 2014, 05:21:02 PM »
And I can tell you - from teaching upper Elementary and my wife teaching High School - a good number of kids age 10-17 believe in ghosts.  And some ouija board movie was coming out recently (no idea what it was, but that was the premise) and a lot of my wife's high school students swore - just based off seeing trailers - it was real.
We are two former teachers who accumulated a bunch of real estate, retired at 29, spent some time traveling the world full time and are now settled with three kids.
If you want to know more about us, or how we did that, or see lots of pictures, this Business Insider profile tells our story pretty well.
We (rarely) blog at AdventuringAlong.com. Check out our Now page to see what we're up to currently.

TheyCallMeWiz

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 3
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #57 on: December 20, 2014, 05:21:45 PM »
I'm relieved to know I changed my ways before I could become, err, that.

eyePod

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 965
    • Flipping A Dollar
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #58 on: December 21, 2014, 05:34:17 AM »
Maybe read some books about personal finance?
My family was "dirt poor" also so that made me determined to be smarter about my own money management.

Suggesting a book is a good idea.  I'm pretty sure that he would have trouble digesting Dave Ramsey's religion references, although I know it works for some people.  If it comes up again, maybe I'll recommend the Millionaire Next Door and/or Millionaire Teacher; the latter has a good section the huge difference that investing early makes, and it also has a pretty good section on cars.

I think there were only two people at that table who might even be ready to receive this information:  the other older guy, who is from another culture and says nearly nothing but I bet has it all figured out already, and the young guy with two new car payments who asked.

I just ignored the religious crap. He's good on the psychology of why. I think one of his big things is the debt snowball where pay off the smaller loans first instead the ones with high interest rates. It really makes sense from a human perspective, not a money one.

economist

  • 5 O'Clock Shadow
  • *
  • Posts: 60
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #59 on: December 23, 2014, 01:52:59 PM »
23 year old here. My Samsung dumb phone cost 30 bucks. When I type the little numbers I can call people and even text them. I have survived thus far without the ability to access the intertubes from my car while driving. When the “Free High Speed Internet” at the apartment my GF and I share proved too slow for Netflix and The Youtube, we got a 2 MB/S Ethernet service that the customer service rep trying to upsell us said was below the minimum requirements for Netflix. It works fine. We take turns with the “fast internet” when one of us wants to watch something. We spend well under 50/month on phones and internet.

capital

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 451
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #60 on: December 23, 2014, 02:49:11 PM »
I send the occasional SnapChat & plenty of Instagrams. It costs $30/mo. on T-Mobile prepaid.

The smartphone upgrade cycle is probably going to slow down (as the laptop upgrade cycle has) now that phones aren't improving nearly as rapidly as in the ~2007-2012 era, and more carriers are starting to break out the cost of phone installments as opposed to hiding them in the overall bill.

MoneyCat

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1752
  • Location: New Jersey
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #61 on: December 23, 2014, 03:13:54 PM »
Everyone on here just doesn't understand.  The most important thing is to be able to take lots of selfies and post them on social networks so people can "like" them and you feel validated.  If you don't do that, you can't have any sense of self-worth.

capital

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 451
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #62 on: December 25, 2014, 12:45:54 AM »
Instagram is pretty fun. It certainly makes one's photography hobby more enjoyable when you can share it. People send some pretty fun drawings on SnapChat, too.

And both of those programs are free, and work great on cheap prepaid phones & plans!


Most selfies are ironic, too.

Also, look at this fucking selfie:

Nice pubestache. Stupid narcissistic teen.

Zamboni

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2702
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #63 on: December 25, 2014, 02:37:04 PM »
Rembrandt was a narcissist?  Not sure about that, but he definitely wasn't very mustachian.  Perhaps he would indeed feel right at home at our pub table?

justajane

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2146
  • Location: Midwest
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #64 on: December 25, 2014, 03:00:51 PM »
I certainly don't think the obsession with smartphones and data plans is limited to those in their 20s. I'm nearing 40, and among my friend set, we are the lone hold outs who still have flip phones. Keep in mind that all these people spent their teenage and early adult years with no cell phone at all, much less internet access. Heck, I didn't even have an e-mail account or internet access until I went to college.

Yet now these same people are plugged in all the time. Once I sent an IM to one of my good friends via Facebook. After a few minutes, he wrote back, "Argh. You woke me up!" He works nights often, but my question was, why the hell do you have your phone right next to your bed and have Facebook notifications on? People just adapt to what they have recently been exposed to. It's an addiction of sorts. I almost understand it more in twenty somethings who have never known anything different, but that those older who lived their formative years unplugged are also obsessed with their smartphones speaks to how addictive the technology is. 

clarkfan1979

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2142
  • Age: 41
  • Location: Pueblo West, CO
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #65 on: December 26, 2014, 04:37:09 AM »
It seemed as though moving back in with your parents after college became popular in the early 1990's. People in their young 20s saved money to buy a house.

However, when my generation moved back in with our parents (early 2000's), it seemed as though no one saved anything. We all partied. When you don't have any bills, you can blow a lot of money at the bar.

I saved about 30% of my paycheck which I taught was pretty good. However, after considering that I did not have any bills, 30% doesn't seem all that impressive.

I was doing odd jobs before grad school so I didn't make much. However, some of my friends had corporate jobs, lived at home and spent close to everything at the bar for about two years.

Indexer

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1463
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #66 on: December 26, 2014, 10:10:22 PM »
I have lived this exact same conversation.  I'm a millennial by the way. 

I tried to convince people to dump Verizon and their $100 phone bills when I had a Nexus 4 with T Mobile paying $40.  That was a challenge and at the time a $300 Nexus 4 was probably the best phone on the market regardless of price.  It is still a comparable phone to a brand new iphone 6 a couple years later.  The excuse:  T mobile has a great signal in cities, but what if you drove to another city... you might not have data in between!!!!!

Now I have the Moto X with Republic.  I make a point of telling people about the $25/month plan, that it uses Verizon/Sprint networks, AND if you happen to be around wifi all the time you can actually get it down to $10.  People seem interested, but then make excuses and never switch.  WHAT!?   I'm offering to save you $100/month.  The price... you have to have a Moto X instead of an iPhone... the horror!!!   

greenmimama

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 718
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #67 on: December 28, 2014, 11:01:39 AM »
Personally I see the 20 somethings as having more to spend their money on, more that seems necessary, they are bombarded with "You need this Advertising"

Just think 15 years ago:

Their wasn't a starbucks on every corner
It wasn't normal to buy $5+ coffees

It wasn't normal to have a really expensive phone with a data plan

HGTV was newer and hadn't influenced every young person looking for a home that they can't live without all the luxuries their parents worked 20 years to be able to afford.

No it is not just 20 somethings that are bad with money, they are out their in every single decade in droves, but these young people now just grew up with diff. perspectives than we did, as did my grandparents before me.

We can al learn what is good and not let society tell us what we need.

ambimammular

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 417
  • Age: 43
  • Location: Indiana
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #68 on: December 28, 2014, 03:37:07 PM »

HGTV was newer and hadn't influenced every young person looking for a home that they can't live without all the luxuries their parents worked 20 years to be able to afford.

I see a bit of HGTV when I visit my parents over winter break. It always leaves me feeling discontent about our bathtub, fireplace, non-wood floors, etc. Then I go home and remember how awesome our house is without all the negative HGTV vibes.

Does make me think about rental properties though...

I'm a red panda

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8193
  • Location: United States
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #69 on: December 30, 2014, 08:19:51 AM »
Personally I see the 20 somethings as having more to spend their money on, more that seems necessary, they are bombarded with "You need this Advertising"

Just think 15 years ago:

Their wasn't a starbucks on every corner
It wasn't normal to buy $5+ coffees

It wasn't normal to have a really expensive phone with a data plan

HGTV was newer and hadn't influenced every young person looking for a home that they can't live without all the luxuries their parents worked 20 years to be able to afford.

No it is not just 20 somethings that are bad with money, they are out their in every single decade in droves, but these young people now just grew up with diff. perspectives than we did, as did my grandparents before me.

We can al learn what is good and not let society tell us what we need.


I think 15 years ago isn't as far back as you meant to go.

15 years ago it was massively cool to hang out in coffee shops and order fancy coffee.  And there were Starbucks most everywhere already, but of course, private shops were even better.  The 90s were the era of the coffee shop, thanks the shows like Friends. Even in middle school, I remember going to coffee shops- it was the main thing we did to 'hang out' in high school.

No, there were no data plans yet- but cell phones were already taking over, and plans were expensive.  Plus just about 15 years ago was when people were discovering texting, and there weren't unlimited plans available. I knew college kids who spent nearly their rent in texts, as they were charged per text sent and received. (Though, at least for me, the texting bug really hit about 13-14 years ago.)

HGTV WAS already huge 15 years ago. House Hunters hit the air in 1999.  And was about to get even bigger, as 14 years ago Trading Space hit the airwaves, and that was a giant phenomenon.

greenmimama

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 718
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #70 on: December 30, 2014, 10:38:04 AM »
Personally I see the 20 somethings as having more to spend their money on, more that seems necessary, they are bombarded with "You need this Advertising"

Just think 15 years ago:

Their wasn't a starbucks on every corner
It wasn't normal to buy $5+ coffees

It wasn't normal to have a really expensive phone with a data plan

HGTV was newer and hadn't influenced every young person looking for a home that they can't live without all the luxuries their parents worked 20 years to be able to afford.

No it is not just 20 somethings that are bad with money, they are out their in every single decade in droves, but these young people now just grew up with diff. perspectives than we did, as did my grandparents before me.

We can al learn what is good and not let society tell us what we need.


I think 15 years ago isn't as far back as you meant to go.

15 years ago it was massively cool to hang out in coffee shops and order fancy coffee.  And there were Starbucks most everywhere already, but of course, private shops were even better.  The 90s were the era of the coffee shop, thanks the shows like Friends. Even in middle school, I remember going to coffee shops- it was the main thing we did to 'hang out' in high school.

No, there were no data plans yet- but cell phones were already taking over, and plans were expensive.  Plus just about 15 years ago was when people were discovering texting, and there weren't unlimited plans available. I knew college kids who spent nearly their rent in texts, as they were charged per text sent and received. (Though, at least for me, the texting bug really hit about 13-14 years ago.)

HGTV WAS already huge 15 years ago. House Hunters hit the air in 1999.  And was about to get even bigger, as 14 years ago Trading Space hit the airwaves, and that was a giant phenomenon.

HGTV started in 1996, it wasn't as popular as it is now right away, takes a bit for things to catch on, coffee houses might have been big in the 90s I think it depends on where you were, my town of about 30,000 had one coffee shop, and none of the starbucks drive throughs for quite awhile.

I think the 15 years is actually late for a lot of the phone trouble I was speaking of. Yes plans were more expensive, but then at least lots pf people I knew used them for actual needs, I had one with a 10 min plan and it was $20 or $30 bucks a month and I never ever talked on it, just had it in my car just in case and that was in 99, but when the iphones came out around that time is when the SHTF so to speak and everyone needed over $100 plans and expensive phones.

So yes 15 years might be a little shy, but not really, I should have said give or take a few years ;)

SpendyMcSpend

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 320
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #71 on: January 08, 2015, 01:01:05 PM »
What concerns me is that I have been very very cognizant of my money and income and everything throughout my 20s (in my 30s now) and I only have $105,000 in my 401k to show for it, and paid down about $23k in student loans and paid cash for my graduate degree (MBA).  I really should have more to show for myself :(

galliver

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1872
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #72 on: January 13, 2015, 12:33:56 PM »
It's really crazy how people expect all sorts of newfangled technologies in their everyday lives right now.  People expect running water and refrigerators and stoves in their homes! You used to have to work years to afford those! And washing machines! The lazy bums don't know how to wash their own clothes anymore! And they refuse to consider an outhouse adequate toilet facilites! Ridiculous!

/sarcasm

Or, you know, we could acknowledge that technology evolves over time and becomes endemic in society. Every comfort of modern life was at some point an unthinkable luxury. But we no longer question that people want glass windows and electricity in their house.

I don't look down on people with basic phones but I also don't idolise them (or rather, you, since some are present). My smartphone and data plan provide me (just me specifically!) a lot of utility. It's not critical, but it's very, very nice, and IMO merits the fraction of my paycheck that goes to it. Maps and transit schedules/routes (even in an unfamiliar city! So I don't spring for a cab because I'm uncomfortable/afraid to get lost!), information to entertain or to settle an argument, access to my bank account, camera for taking pictures, but also taking visual "notes" or for recording something for evidence should I ever need to. I downloaded duolingo yesterday and had fun working on relearning French. I don't have an unlimited plan (I have 2GB+ample wifi access), I do have a pretty new smartphone, but I kept my last one 3 years until it basically gave out. For me, personally, the costs of the phone and service plan are worthwhile, at least for now. As my life evolves, this may change; I'm sure for those who don't think it's worth it...it's actually not worth it. And that's fine.

I do think it's important to ask yourself if you're getting genuine utility from the extra expense. Is Snapchat really strengthening your relationships? Would having to pre-download your music on wifi to listen to it later instead of streaming it be an unthinkable hurdle? I don't think I could justify holding on to an expensive data plan for entertainment alone. But that's me.

justajane

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2146
  • Location: Midwest
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #73 on: January 13, 2015, 12:49:21 PM »
It's really crazy how people expect all sorts of newfangled technologies in their everyday lives right now.  People expect running water and refrigerators and stoves in their homes! You used to have to work years to afford those! And washing machines! The lazy bums don't know how to wash their own clothes anymore! And they refuse to consider an outhouse adequate toilet facilites! Ridiculous!

/sarcasm

Or, you know, we could acknowledge that technology evolves over time and becomes endemic in society. Every comfort of modern life was at some point an unthinkable luxury. But we no longer question that people want glass windows and electricity in their house.

This is fine in theory, but we have to realize that technology is a double edged sword as well. Our normalized expectations are creating more and more ways for us to spend money and thereby less and less ability to adequately save.

Plus (and I question your comparison of a toilet technology to a smartphone), a toilet is bought once and can last decades, but an expensive smartphone is a monthly expense that never ends. As we all know on here, those kill your budget.

I don't have a smartphone not because I'm a Luddite (what you implied was someone's reasoning above); I don't have a smartphone because I don't want one. Full stop. If you want one, that's awesome. But how much do you make a year? If a smartphone costs only a small fraction of your monthly budget and you're not in debt, I'm not sure it matters that much. But the reality is that the device is so normalized now that even people who earn much less (say $20,000 a year) feel like a smartphone is a technology that they can't live without.

And as an exercise, I would argue that it is in all of our interests to contemplate at least how the things that have become endemic in our lives are nonetheless luxuries. And that in many respects, it might be a good exercise to extricate ourselves from our convenience and "suffer" a bit. Isn't that one of the core tenets of Mustachianism? Perhaps smartphones are unfairly targeted on this forum, but in large part it is because it is a new, ubiquitous, and fairly expensive technology. 

Zamboni

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2702
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #74 on: January 13, 2015, 02:05:16 PM »
Fancy expensive phone plans are just a symptom of the disease of affluenza.

Cookie

  • Guest
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #75 on: January 13, 2015, 03:04:08 PM »
When snapchat first came out I was told it was really only for sexting. Imagine my face when it became mainstream and all my friends were talking about how fun it was.

Beric01

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1156
  • Age: 30
  • Location: SF Bay Area
  • Law-abiding cyclist
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #76 on: January 13, 2015, 03:13:54 PM »
I definitely make for a pretty strange 24-year-old. I'm never used Snaptchat or Twitter, and while I have a Facebook account I don't use it. I text a bit, but not more than 100 messages a month. I prefer email and IM to keep in contact with people.  I'm say I'm probably more of a GenX-er than a Millennial by attitude.

galliver

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1872
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #77 on: January 13, 2015, 08:24:24 PM »
It's really crazy how people expect all sorts of newfangled technologies in their everyday lives right now.  People expect running water and refrigerators and stoves in their homes! You used to have to work years to afford those! And washing machines! The lazy bums don't know how to wash their own clothes anymore! And they refuse to consider an outhouse adequate toilet facilites! Ridiculous!

/sarcasm

Or, you know, we could acknowledge that technology evolves over time and becomes endemic in society. Every comfort of modern life was at some point an unthinkable luxury. But we no longer question that people want glass windows and electricity in their house.

This is fine in theory, but we have to realize that technology is a double edged sword as well. Our normalized expectations are creating more and more ways for us to spend money and thereby less and less ability to adequately save.

Plus (and I question your comparison of a toilet technology to a smartphone), a toilet is bought once and can last decades, but an expensive smartphone is a monthly expense that never ends. As we all know on here, those kill your budget.

I don't have a smartphone not because I'm a Luddite (what you implied was someone's reasoning above); I don't have a smartphone because I don't want one. Full stop. If you want one, that's awesome. But how much do you make a year? If a smartphone costs only a small fraction of your monthly budget and you're not in debt, I'm not sure it matters that much. But the reality is that the device is so normalized now that even people who earn much less (say $20,000 a year) feel like a smartphone is a technology that they can't live without.

And as an exercise, I would argue that it is in all of our interests to contemplate at least how the things that have become endemic in our lives are nonetheless luxuries. And that in many respects, it might be a good exercise to extricate ourselves from our convenience and "suffer" a bit. Isn't that one of the core tenets of Mustachianism? Perhaps smartphones are unfairly targeted on this forum, but in large part it is because it is a new, ubiquitous, and fairly expensive technology.

If I implied that no smartphone = technology hating, it was completely accidental and I really don't think that. Not having, or not feeling like you need, a smartphone or any other technology or item is a personal choice. Personally, I find tablets damn-near useless. They're shiny, cool, convenient, and fun toys, but I have zero desire to actually get one. I can certainly believe people feel that way about other items as well.

I also wasn't actually comparing cell phones specifically to toilets or any other technology. I was just trying to position them in the greater flow of technologies, and the response to the introduction of new ones. After thinking about it, I have to disagree that they are the symptom of a "more and more" mentality. A smartphone can replace not only many gadgets (camera, music player, etc I already kind of mentioned them), and also newspapers/subscriptions, books, magazines, coupons... It's a symptom of people wanting less complication in their lives. It's one do-it-all gadget, that contrary to most do-it-all gadgets...really works quite well.

A few more words on technology as a whole...as much as I like the thought experiment of going back to simpler times or even the practical experiment of going camping/backpacking, it's important to remember not to idolize this lifestyle or feel that we can return to it as a society (note: not a judgement on individual choices). I'm thinking of a sort of Amish-level farming community here, which might be more simple than you intended. But when you say "technology just gives us more stuff to buy" then I have to wonder, which point would you go back to? Will that society work with 7 billion people instead of however many existed then?

I don't think going backwards is the answer. I don't think there was an idyllic time when people had enough...that's how we got here. But we're not done yet, and we have a number of problems to solve. I, for one, don't believe we're in a worse place than we've been before, socially or technologically. I don't think blind consumerism is the way, howevermuch that can drive the economy, but we do need to create some consumer demand to push technology forward and I don't believe that's a terrible thing, if done consciously. And consciously, I think a computer more powerful than a room-size mainframe in the palm of my hand is pretty awesome, useful, and has a lot of potential for further growth.

caliq

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 675
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #78 on: January 13, 2015, 08:47:32 PM »
It's really crazy how people expect all sorts of newfangled technologies in their everyday lives right now.  People expect running water and refrigerators and stoves in their homes! You used to have to work years to afford those! And washing machines! The lazy bums don't know how to wash their own clothes anymore! And they refuse to consider an outhouse adequate toilet facilites! Ridiculous!

/sarcasm

Or, you know, we could acknowledge that technology evolves over time and becomes endemic in society. Every comfort of modern life was at some point an unthinkable luxury. But we no longer question that people want glass windows and electricity in their house.

This is fine in theory, but we have to realize that technology is a double edged sword as well. Our normalized expectations are creating more and more ways for us to spend money and thereby less and less ability to adequately save.

Plus (and I question your comparison of a toilet technology to a smartphone), a toilet is bought once and can last decades, but an expensive smartphone is a monthly expense that never ends. As we all know on here, those kill your budget.

I don't have a smartphone not because I'm a Luddite (what you implied was someone's reasoning above); I don't have a smartphone because I don't want one. Full stop. If you want one, that's awesome. But how much do you make a year? If a smartphone costs only a small fraction of your monthly budget and you're not in debt, I'm not sure it matters that much. But the reality is that the device is so normalized now that even people who earn much less (say $20,000 a year) feel like a smartphone is a technology that they can't live without.

And as an exercise, I would argue that it is in all of our interests to contemplate at least how the things that have become endemic in our lives are nonetheless luxuries. And that in many respects, it might be a good exercise to extricate ourselves from our convenience and "suffer" a bit. Isn't that one of the core tenets of Mustachianism? Perhaps smartphones are unfairly targeted on this forum, but in large part it is because it is a new, ubiquitous, and fairly expensive technology.

If I implied that no smartphone = technology hating, it was completely accidental and I really don't think that. Not having, or not feeling like you need, a smartphone or any other technology or item is a personal choice. Personally, I find tablets damn-near useless. They're shiny, cool, convenient, and fun toys, but I have zero desire to actually get one. I can certainly believe people feel that way about other items as well.

I also wasn't actually comparing cell phones specifically to toilets or any other technology. I was just trying to position them in the greater flow of technologies, and the response to the introduction of new ones. After thinking about it, I have to disagree that they are the symptom of a "more and more" mentality. A smartphone can replace not only many gadgets (camera, music player, etc I already kind of mentioned them), and also newspapers/subscriptions, books, magazines, coupons... It's a symptom of people wanting less complication in their lives. It's one do-it-all gadget, that contrary to most do-it-all gadgets...really works quite well.

A few more words on technology as a whole...as much as I like the thought experiment of going back to simpler times or even the practical experiment of going camping/backpacking, it's important to remember not to idolize this lifestyle or feel that we can return to it as a society (note: not a judgement on individual choices). I'm thinking of a sort of Amish-level farming community here, which might be more simple than you intended. But when you say "technology just gives us more stuff to buy" then I have to wonder, which point would you go back to? Will that society work with 7 billion people instead of however many existed then?

I don't think going backwards is the answer. I don't think there was an idyllic time when people had enough...that's how we got here. But we're not done yet, and we have a number of problems to solve. I, for one, don't believe we're in a worse place than we've been before, socially or technologically. I don't think blind consumerism is the way, howevermuch that can drive the economy, but we do need to create some consumer demand to push technology forward and I don't believe that's a terrible thing, if done consciously. And consciously, I think a computer more powerful than a room-size mainframe in the palm of my hand is pretty awesome, useful, and has a lot of potential for further growth.

+1

Well said. 

My smartphone is my mp3 player, camera, GPS, dictionary/spell check/thesaurus, email/text based communication device, voice communication device, calorie tracker, activity tracker, notepad, calendar, calculator, financial tracking device, and probably a lot of other things I'm forgetting at the moment.  Ten years ago I had a separate electronic for at least half that stuff. 

Technology itself and the consumption of technology is not anything to find worrisome -- the problem is over consumption and over paying for it.

And justajane, a lot of low income people with smart phones use them as their sole access point for the internet.  They don't have computers at home, and might not have internet either.  3G/4G is it for them, and in this day and age I really don't think you can argue that internet access is a technology you can live without.

YoungInvestor

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 411
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #79 on: January 13, 2015, 10:52:34 PM »
20-something here...

Most of the people I know are fairly responsible with money, debt is kept to a minimum and people have old-ish cars or no car at all (like me).

I don't think everyone wants to live a frugal lifestyle, and that's ok, you need to find your own balance.

galliver

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1872
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #80 on: January 13, 2015, 11:14:46 PM »



And justajane, a lot of low income people with smart phones use them as their sole access point for the internet.  They don't have computers at home, and might not have internet either.  3G/4G is it for them, and in this day and age I really don't think you can argue that internet access is a technology you can live without.

Wanted to say thanks for the kudos, I spent way too long composing that (mostly to actually figure out my viewpoint and avoid rambling, though, so good brain exercise).

Also agree with that point though, and can add that I would expect low income individuals to be more likely to use public transit, and Google Maps and other apps make that so much more practical (you can find an alternate route or look up when the bus is coming esp on an inclement day, etc).

justajane

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 2146
  • Location: Midwest
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #81 on: January 14, 2015, 07:20:24 AM »
If I implied that no smartphone = technology hating, it was completely accidental and I really don't think that. Not having, or not feeling like you need, a smartphone or any other technology or item is a personal choice. Personally, I find tablets damn-near useless. They're shiny, cool, convenient, and fun toys, but I have zero desire to actually get one. I can certainly believe people feel that way about other items as well.

I also wasn't actually comparing cell phones specifically to toilets or any other technology. I was just trying to position them in the greater flow of technologies, and the response to the introduction of new ones. After thinking about it, I have to disagree that they are the symptom of a "more and more" mentality. A smartphone can replace not only many gadgets (camera, music player, etc I already kind of mentioned them), and also newspapers/subscriptions, books, magazines, coupons... It's a symptom of people wanting less complication in their lives. It's one do-it-all gadget, that contrary to most do-it-all gadgets...really works quite well.

A few more words on technology as a whole...as much as I like the thought experiment of going back to simpler times or even the practical experiment of going camping/backpacking, it's important to remember not to idolize this lifestyle or feel that we can return to it as a society (note: not a judgement on individual choices). I'm thinking of a sort of Amish-level farming community here, which might be more simple than you intended. But when you say "technology just gives us more stuff to buy" then I have to wonder, which point would you go back to? Will that society work with 7 billion people instead of however many existed then?

I don't think going backwards is the answer. I don't think there was an idyllic time when people had enough...that's how we got here. But we're not done yet, and we have a number of problems to solve. I, for one, don't believe we're in a worse place than we've been before, socially or technologically. I don't think blind consumerism is the way, howevermuch that can drive the economy, but we do need to create some consumer demand to push technology forward and I don't believe that's a terrible thing, if done consciously. And consciously, I think a computer more powerful than a room-size mainframe in the palm of my hand is pretty awesome, useful, and has a lot of potential for further growth.

You make some great points, and I really  don't think our views are that far apart. My main objection was to your sarcastic entry, a common trope when people dare to question either the social or financial ramifications of insert new technology. It's often used as a way to dismiss arguments out of hand. That clearly wasn't your intent, though, upon further reading of your views.

caliq - I actually support low income people having smartphones for the reasons you laid out, but that doesn't mean that the technology is kind to their bottom line. I support a much higher minimum wage that would enable them to better afford internet access and the technology they  carry in their pocket. My beef is more with the middle income earners who have internet at home and most other places; yet, when you suggest that they drop their data plan or get a cheaper plan, they scoff. After all, they neeeeeeed it. I will admit, this does get my goat.

The reality is that wages have not kept up with the increasing introduction of more and more "essential" technology. It's astounding to me how many more ways we have to spend money today. My husband loves new and shiny things that we haul to the recycling center 5 years later. He's pretty good about shopping smart, but I can't help but look at all that and think of the environmental and financial effects. These are the things that drive technology forward (as you state), but the process is not without its real downsides. Think of the workers in Asia, some of whom have life long health problems, so that we can afford a computer in the palm of our hands.

Jennifer in Ottawa

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 122
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #82 on: January 19, 2015, 09:19:47 PM »
I just can't fathom how someone can consider "sending snaps" an absolute necessity that they are willing to pay an extra $120/mo for.  I don't even know what snapchat is, though I'm guessing it has something to do with posting photographs of yourself or your surroundings.
It's not even that. Call me lazy and spoiled, but I don't want to live without data.....

So if data plans ceased to be offered for some strange reason, we can assume you and your ilk would be throwing yourselves off of bridges en masse?

If not, then don't make such stupid statements.

caliq

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 675
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #83 on: January 19, 2015, 09:27:55 PM »
I just can't fathom how someone can consider "sending snaps" an absolute necessity that they are willing to pay an extra $120/mo for.  I don't even know what snapchat is, though I'm guessing it has something to do with posting photographs of yourself or your surroundings.
It's not even that. Call me lazy and spoiled, but I don't want to live without data.....

So if data plans ceased to be offered for some strange reason, we can assume you and your ilk would be throwing yourselves off of bridges en masse?

If not, then don't make such stupid statements.

"I don't want to live" does not equal "I cannot live without."

Data is a useful tool.  Twenty-five years ago, people in your position were saying what you say now about the internet.  Time marches on, get used to it.

Goldielocks

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6822
  • Location: BC
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #84 on: January 20, 2015, 12:07:30 AM »
Personally I see the 20 somethings as having more to spend their money on, more that seems necessary, they are bombarded with "You need this Advertising"

Just think 15 years ago:

Their wasn't a starbucks on every corner
It wasn't normal to buy $5+ coffees

It wasn't normal to have a really expensive phone with a data plan

HGTV was newer and hadn't influenced every young person looking for a home that they can't live without all the luxuries their parents worked 20 years to be able to afford.

No it is not just 20 somethings that are bad with money, they are out their in every single decade in droves, but these young people now just grew up with diff. perspectives than we did, as did my grandparents before me.

We can al learn what is good and not let society tell us what we need.

Your 15 years is a bit short term..  My first summer office job(govt job), I was introduced to walking across the street EVERY DAY to Starbucks for coffee and a muffin.  That was 1991, or 24 years ago.  I am shamed yo say it lasted a month or two.

Also, I remember a very popular TV show, maybe you do too? : lifestyles of the rich and famous.

Anyone coming of age as a teen in the '80's were bombarded with rich money laden imagery, to look rich was THE american dream.

After that?    BOOM! The cool&hip after work PUB craze arose in the '90's.   Meanwhile, we all HAD to have great desktop PCs at home, a HIFI Harmon Karman stereo, so many cd's for our collections, and remember fancy car rims and car stereo bass systems that shook the whole street and awoke the neighbors?


Definitely agree with your last sentence, but I don't think human nature has changed, just the technology and thing purchased, by decade.

jinga nation

  • Handlebar Stache
  • *****
  • Posts: 1587
  • Location: 'Murica's Johnson
  • Left, Right, Peddlin' Shite
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #85 on: January 20, 2015, 10:38:42 AM »
So, instead of kvetching on the inevitable spending by 20- (and 30-)somethings, what are you doing to profit from it? They're going to be irresponsible in spite of your and my efforts to educate them on the virtues of being financially responsible. Young and Stupid, we've all been there, myself included.

I saw a 15-20 slide deck 4 years ago and decided to purchase RE (condos, townhouses) to rent to working professionals (young and old), who either can't afford to buy a SFH, or don't want to deal with maintenance. Best ROI when the stock markets were in turmoil.

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7845
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #86 on: January 20, 2015, 01:30:00 PM »
So, instead of kvetching on the inevitable spending by 20- (and 30-)somethings, what are you doing to profit from it? They're going to be irresponsible in spite of your and my efforts to educate them on the virtues of being financially responsible. Young and Stupid, we've all been there, myself included.

I saw a 15-20 slide deck 4 years ago and decided to purchase RE (condos, townhouses) to rent to working professionals (young and old), who either can't afford to buy a SFH, or don't want to deal with maintenance. Best ROI when the stock markets were in turmoil.

i mean i still dont understand the need to put this on 20 somethings ... 90% of most wage earners in america grossly overspend.  whether its the 30 somethings putting their kids in montesory schools or the 40 somethings taking 10k family vacations and buying 9 year olds cell phones or the 50 year olds putting their kindergartener in montessory schools. 

i could as a 28 year old go out with a group from any age group and see gross over spending.  its not an age problem its a societal norm learned from all the bad spenders who came before. 

the 20 somethings should start a "WTF arent these old people retiring for, oh thats right they didnt save anything so now we dont have jobs" post

*Disclaimer i have a job
« Last Edit: January 20, 2015, 03:02:34 PM by boarder42 »

I'm a red panda

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8193
  • Location: United States
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #87 on: January 20, 2015, 01:35:33 PM »
i mean i still dont understand the need to put this on 20 somethings ...

It's apparently fun to blame things on millenials.

Goldielocks

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6822
  • Location: BC
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #88 on: January 20, 2015, 09:20:12 PM »
So, instead of kvetching....

i mean i still dont understand the need to put this on 20 somethings ... 90% of most wage earners in america grossly overspend.  whether its the 30 somethings putting their kids in montesory schools or the 40 somethings taking 10k family vacations and buying 9 year olds cell phones or the 50 year olds putting their kindergartener in montessory schools

i could as a 28 year old go out with a group from any age group and see gross over spending.  its not an age problem its a societal norm learned from all the bad spenders who came before. 

the 20 somethings should start a "WTF arent these old people retiring for, oh thats right they didnt save anything so now we dont have jobs" post

*Disclaimer i have a job

Man, you really dislike Montesory schools.   Do they really cost a lot of money?  I had the perception that they were nearly free....

boarder42

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 7845
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #89 on: January 21, 2015, 06:07:18 AM »
So, instead of kvetching....

i mean i still dont understand the need to put this on 20 somethings ... 90% of most wage earners in america grossly overspend.  whether its the 30 somethings putting their kids in montesory schools or the 40 somethings taking 10k family vacations and buying 9 year olds cell phones or the 50 year olds putting their kindergartener in montessory schools

i could as a 28 year old go out with a group from any age group and see gross over spending.  its not an age problem its a societal norm learned from all the bad spenders who came before. 

the 20 somethings should start a "WTF arent these old people retiring for, oh thats right they didnt save anything so now we dont have jobs" post

*Disclaimer i have a job

Man, you really dislike Montesory schools.   Do they really cost a lot of money?  I had the perception that they were nearly free....



I'm was just trying to point out that at every stage of your life there is something that people are saying you need to spend you money on.  Whether the 20 somethings over use data or over drink coffee or need the latest tech, or the 30 somethings over spend on their kids b/c the "want the best" even though the best is more related to what YOU do with them than pawning that off on some school.  The Montessori stuff just came out as an example... i was going to go into all the little league sports etc that people over pay for their kids to be the next Lebron James (look you're short your SO is short he's not gonna be Kobe)  AAU isnt worth the time or money.... etc.  gross over spending happens at every level. 

And i'd bet half the people that are posting on this topic arent going to retire before 40 b/c they themselves didnt save.  So when you're faced with the reality of blatantly classifying us millennials turn around and look in the mirror and ask how it feels to know we'll be retired in less working years than you. 

I'm a red panda

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8193
  • Location: United States
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #90 on: January 21, 2015, 07:24:10 AM »

Man, you really dislike Montesory schools.   Do they really cost a lot of money?  I had the perception that they were nearly free....

The one here is $8,000 a year for full day (school year only August- May) for preschool.

By contrast, the Catholic private school full tuition (can be cut in half by being an active member of the parish, though that likely involves tithing too) is $6,000 for K-6 up to $10,000 for high school.  They don't have a preschool though, just something to compare to.

Pooperman

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2880
  • Age: 30
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #91 on: January 21, 2015, 07:39:32 AM »

Man, you really dislike Montesory schools.   Do they really cost a lot of money?  I had the perception that they were nearly free....

The one here is $8,000 a year for full day (school year only August- May) for preschool.

By contrast, the Catholic private school full tuition (can be cut in half by being an active member of the parish, though that likely involves tithing too) is $6,000 for K-6 up to $10,000 for high school.  They don't have a preschool though, just something to compare to.

I'll admit it. I went to private school from K-7. Best as I can recall, the price was $10k/yr until it was upped to $12k/yr around 4th or 5th. I have fond memories of going there, and it shaped who I am far more than any other school. It was a breeding ground of frugality (ironic given the nature of price and private 'n all). The philosophy was similar to Montesory I think. No computers until high school. No TV/radio/outside influence. Basically blocked out consumerism for the most part, so when I went to public school 8-12, it was much more of a shock how people were. I mean I saw it when I was younger, just from the outside. It was foreign.

Other neat things about the school: everyone was treated the same, but not in a politically correct way. Everyone was expected to play sports, paint, write, do math, learn foreign language(s), dance, sing, etc. Got to throw javelin and discus in 5th (public won't touch that until high school). Went on epic class trips every year (canoeing, hiking, island camping, white water rafting, caving, you get the idea). The school philosophy was one of DIY badassity, and where knowing how to learn was more important than knowing a few random facts.

Pooperman

  • Magnum Stache
  • ******
  • Posts: 2880
  • Age: 30
  • Location: North Carolina
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #92 on: January 21, 2015, 08:06:10 AM »

Man, you really dislike Montesory schools.   Do they really cost a lot of money?  I had the perception that they were nearly free....

The one here is $8,000 a year for full day (school year only August- May) for preschool.

By contrast, the Catholic private school full tuition (can be cut in half by being an active member of the parish, though that likely involves tithing too) is $6,000 for K-6 up to $10,000 for high school.  They don't have a preschool though, just something to compare to.

I'll admit it. I went to private school from K-7. Best as I can recall, the price was $10k/yr until it was upped to $12k/yr around 4th or 5th. I have fond memories of going there, and it shaped who I am far more than any other school. It was a breeding ground of frugality (ironic given the nature of price and private 'n all). The philosophy was similar to Montesory I think. No computers until high school. No TV/radio/outside influence. Basically blocked out consumerism for the most part, so when I went to public school 8-12, it was much more of a shock how people were. I mean I saw it when I was younger, just from the outside. It was foreign.

Other neat things about the school: everyone was treated the same, but not in a politically correct way. Everyone was expected to play sports, paint, write, do math, learn foreign language(s), dance, sing, etc. Got to throw javelin and discus in 5th (public won't touch that until high school). Went on epic class trips every year (canoeing, hiking, island camping, white water rafting, caving, you get the idea). The school philosophy was one of DIY badassity, and where knowing how to learn was more important than knowing a few random facts.

That school sounds pretty awesome... but the math of that tuition is astounding... We have free access (well, taxes) to a Montessori school in our area... but my wife didn't really like it.  So plain old normal Joe Schmo school for our kids :)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waldorf_education

I'm a red panda

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 8193
  • Location: United States
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #93 on: January 21, 2015, 08:07:20 AM »
Got to throw javelin and discus in 5th (public won't touch that until high school).

I don't think we had javelin, but I threw discus and shotput in 6th grade. I went to public schools. 
You did have to wait until high school for pole vault.

dragoncar

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 9333
  • Registered member
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #94 on: January 25, 2015, 12:58:48 PM »
I just can't fathom how someone can consider "sending snaps" an absolute necessity that they are willing to pay an extra $120/mo for.  I don't even know what snapchat is, though I'm guessing it has something to do with posting photographs of yourself or your surroundings.
It's not even that. Call me lazy and spoiled, but I don't want to live without data.....

So if data plans ceased to be offered for some strange reason, we can assume you and your ilk would be throwing yourselves off of bridges en masse?

If not, then don't make such stupid statements.

"I don't want to live" does not equal "I cannot live without."

Data is a useful tool.  Twenty-five years ago, people in your position were saying what you say now about the internet.  Time marches on, get used to it.

I think you mean "I don't want to have to live without data"

"I don't want to live" = kill self

caliq

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 675
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #95 on: January 25, 2015, 01:04:44 PM »
I just can't fathom how someone can consider "sending snaps" an absolute necessity that they are willing to pay an extra $120/mo for.  I don't even know what snapchat is, though I'm guessing it has something to do with posting photographs of yourself or your surroundings.
It's not even that. Call me lazy and spoiled, but I don't want to live without data.....

So if data plans ceased to be offered for some strange reason, we can assume you and your ilk would be throwing yourselves off of bridges en masse?

If not, then don't make such stupid statements.

"I don't want to live" does not equal "I cannot live without."

Data is a useful tool.  Twenty-five years ago, people in your position were saying what you say now about the internet.  Time marches on, get used to it.

I think you mean "I don't want to have to live without data"

"I don't want to live" = kill self

I think we're differing in the interpretation of the word want. 

I most certainly do not want to live without data, but I definitely could live without data and wouldn't kill myself if the technology disappeared tomorrow.

Pooplips

  • Bristles
  • ***
  • Posts: 463
  • Age: 34
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #96 on: January 26, 2015, 08:34:26 AM »
I'm 28 and the struggle is real. I agree with above posts about how at every stage in your live there is spending pressure.

Early 20s it was bars, cars, clothes and gadgets.
I recently had a child and now  if I don't spend on this or that my daughter is going to be left behind, somehow.
There is constant pressure from my parents generation to buy a house (renting is stupid), upgrade everything, go on a yearly vacation, etc.

Everyone seems to have made priorities on how I should spend MY money and if my views don't align with there's im an idiot or cheap. "What do you mean you don't have cable. You need to live a little. " haha since when is watching cable living.

I'm just going to keep saving. One day it will make sense to everyone else.

eyePod

  • Pencil Stache
  • ****
  • Posts: 965
    • Flipping A Dollar
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #97 on: January 26, 2015, 09:33:33 AM »
Everyone on here just doesn't understand.  The most important thing is to be able to take lots of selfies and post them on social networks so people can "like" them and you feel validated.  If you don't do that, you can't have any sense of self-worth.

My parents take more selfies than me. It's ridiculous. Stupid older people who don't have to deal with kids all the time.

jzb11

  • Stubble
  • **
  • Posts: 139
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #98 on: January 26, 2015, 10:03:20 AM »
I don't think this is a bash millenials post at all, if anything it's indicative of the trend in our society in that most people are spending and not saving, whether they're millenials, gen y, x or baby boomers.

Your suburbs are filled with married couples of all in debt up to their eyeballs. The same crap in the overheard at work thread.

I had a forty year old co-worker just sell a new jeep wrangler a few years ago that he couldn't afford. Now he' stoked about the fact that gas has went down because it's inexpensive to fill up his new alunimum F150. When he saw I drove an old compact car, was fairly frugal, and not interested in buying his wrangler (his suggestion) he asked "But what do you spend your money on?!".

A good friend of mine just told her co-workers that she'll retire when she accumulates 3 million in ten years. She's already at the million dollar mark. How do you think her co-workers responded? Just like the majority of people who don't save and spend like mad.

Really, it's not a 20s or 30s or 40s thing, it's everywhere, at all ages.

« Last Edit: January 27, 2015, 04:42:43 AM by jzb11 »

Goldielocks

  • Walrus Stache
  • *******
  • Posts: 6822
  • Location: BC
Re: faced with the reality of most 20-something spending . . .
« Reply #99 on: January 27, 2015, 12:22:50 AM »
Everyone on here just doesn't understand.  The most important thing is to be able to take lots of selfies and post them on social networks so people can "like" them and you feel validated.  If you don't do that, you can't have any sense of self-worth.

My parents take more selfies than me. It's ridiculous. Stupid older people who don't have to deal with kids all the time.

Ooh! I am going to get my dad (72yo) a selfie stick for his birthday. I wonder if craigslist has any.  Thanks for the idea-I am a bit new to all this phone tech, myself.

--Hmm not sure if I am being sarcastic or not--